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[gawk-diffs] [SCM] gawk branch, master, updated. gawk-4.1.0-3827-g4a034a


From: Arnold Robbins
Subject: [gawk-diffs] [SCM] gawk branch, master, updated. gawk-4.1.0-3827-g4a034ab
Date: Tue, 24 Sep 2019 13:52:26 -0400 (EDT)

This is an automated email from the git hooks/post-receive script. It was
generated because a ref change was pushed to the repository containing
the project "gawk".

The branch, master has been updated
       via  4a034ab5b224f2def385e99490cfaa69db3e1895 (commit)
      from  09efc00fdb6af9376c13db420930dd48e9b273d0 (commit)

Those revisions listed above that are new to this repository have
not appeared on any other notification email; so we list those
revisions in full, below.

- Log -----------------------------------------------------------------
http://git.sv.gnu.org/cgit/gawk.git/commit/?id=4a034ab5b224f2def385e99490cfaa69db3e1895

commit 4a034ab5b224f2def385e99490cfaa69db3e1895
Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
Date:   Tue Sep 24 20:51:51 2019 +0300

    Squashed commit of the following:
    
    commit 779f64fd18d9d8ea09ac60f8fbbc9bb330a0bf33
    Merge: 5e1b216 92a7d23
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Sun Sep 22 20:34:09 2019 +0300
    
        Merge branch 'master' into feature/better-index
    
    commit 5e1b2168b2778bf4a03f14455026500db1ce3eac
    Merge: cccdba8 7feb08d
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Tue Sep 17 11:47:48 2019 +0300
    
        Merge branch 'master' into feature/better-index
    
    commit cccdba8946c17d74ca920d1c0bf0394cccc91ab9
    Merge: b36bc38 abc7fc6
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Sun Sep 1 21:32:13 2019 +0300
    
        Merge branch 'master' into feature/better-index
    
    commit b36bc3839132d425b77bc0c29585fc399e722e4e
    Merge: f9f5833 0d7384c
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Sun Sep 1 21:30:35 2019 +0300
    
        Merge branch 'master' into feature/better-index
    
    commit f9f5833f8264e352ad5d0c11e9cdf6cc7cab957d
    Merge: d5fdd72 c15d2db
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Fri Aug 30 13:24:39 2019 +0300
    
        Merge branch 'master' into feature/better-index
    
    commit d5fdd72cbdaeed4bb79ea2333afd892538ecac2a
    Merge: 7d394b5 58982af
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Fri Aug 23 13:25:16 2019 +0300
    
        Merge branch 'master' into feature/better-index
    
    commit 7d394b58e0a7ab155d8127acf4433c427bb4ff63
    Merge: b89bb5f 4ee83ad
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Wed Aug 21 20:31:38 2019 +0300
    
        Merge branch 'master' into feature/better-index
    
    commit b89bb5f708c777216e0517f71f34fda6c8384fd7
    Merge: de1841d 98e500f
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Thu Aug 15 21:42:23 2019 +0300
    
        Merge branch 'master' into feature/better-index
    
    commit de1841d26dc01ee7b98ebbb9fd1057bb622bea53
    Merge: 23e365f 631c606
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Sun Aug 11 15:12:44 2019 +0300
    
        Merge branch 'master' into feature/better-index
    
    commit 23e365f89aa18d574fc1d59cfc49e2d614d07ad9
    Merge: b881935 41248c3
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Fri Aug 9 13:27:25 2019 +0300
    
        Merge branch 'master' into feature/better-index
    
    commit b881935f23a5acaaa11a32bb9c825f0cbf773b87
    Merge: 91bfdd2 c5d33ce
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Wed Aug 7 21:04:04 2019 +0300
    
        Merge branch 'master' into feature/better-index
    
    commit 91bfdd29f34aae06ce697087a5aeb2b8bb166b57
    Merge: 535d1f8 9e237cf
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Tue Jul 23 06:22:39 2019 +0300
    
        Merge branch 'master' into feature/better-index
    
    commit 535d1f87b3548669d56e0afb3f66051c28f251a6
    Merge: 6a84244 825817a
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Tue Jul 16 20:36:05 2019 +0300
    
        Merge branch 'master' into feature/better-index
    
    commit 6a84244105c8dbb6a4c3f9ecbe6f628f1f1f232f
    Merge: 4f59334 2a44a09
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Fri Jul 12 13:31:48 2019 +0300
    
        Merge branch 'master' into feature/better-index
    
    commit 4f593346798241eea8f1352b23c1548d5769dd6f
    Merge: e1dde45 407990e
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Tue Jul 9 22:08:27 2019 +0300
    
        Merge branch 'master' into feature/better-index
    
    commit e1dde45faec0ad4749cc76d3021a56bb6d3916c1
    Merge: 62c3f6a 43d8598
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Fri Jul 5 11:56:28 2019 +0300
    
        Merge branch 'master' into feature/better-index
    
    commit 62c3f6ab5227e5a04054506e2a292f7e92d63ec1
    Merge: b825a44 acc40a5
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Sun Jun 30 21:34:50 2019 +0300
    
        Merge branch 'master' into feature/better-index
    
    commit b825a4464a2c9747f79362d538ea6befa1306626
    Merge: 0ae4a8c ca067d6
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Fri Jun 28 12:01:47 2019 +0300
    
        Merge branch 'master' into feature/better-index
    
    commit 0ae4a8c2e58c930b5fc16e2417fe2fcf2ebb1b4a
    Merge: 753dd0b 5892bca
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Wed Jun 26 21:46:18 2019 +0300
    
        Merge branch 'master' into feature/better-index
    
    commit 753dd0b0520b70f6743b851997a0b68503b34231
    Merge: 6014175 b19cc51
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Fri Jun 21 11:54:46 2019 +0300
    
        Merge branch 'master' into feature/better-index
    
    commit 6014175606d69108f3f2d0401e2876c5bf3314bd
    Merge: 3c4486a d5a2524
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Wed Jun 19 22:36:37 2019 +0300
    
        Merge branch 'master' into feature/better-index
    
    commit 3c4486a411e45c59f423f4a7da7bfdfa379b0466
    Merge: 0c9eb36 395fc52
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Tue Jun 18 21:22:23 2019 +0300
    
        Merge branch 'master' into feature/better-index
    
    commit 0c9eb36227325fd5ef8b43c3064f2b719d6d3e82
    Merge: b09a43a b79186d
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Mon Jun 17 09:04:08 2019 +0300
    
        Merge branch 'master' into feature/better-index
    
    commit b09a43ac692df955a88e55b62a53d7f9b25349be
    Merge: fcd3a99 a13ec1e
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Tue Jun 11 22:21:42 2019 +0300
    
        Merge branch 'master' into feature/better-index
    
    commit fcd3a998082c7f7eb0dacd2bdaeab95dfcf24f2c
    Merge: d33d334 991f242
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Thu Jun 6 20:24:15 2019 +0300
    
        Merge branch 'master' into feature/better-index
    
    commit d33d334b59ce150a3fea35f10852f3c68616e5cc
    Merge: 6e73114 18e5593
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Wed Jun 5 21:41:24 2019 +0300
    
        Merge branch 'master' into feature/better-index
    
    commit 6e73114fd948ed9764a8447866bc17d387b518b4
    Merge: 6876fef 4b31ece
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Sun Jun 2 21:56:35 2019 +0300
    
        Merge branch 'master' into feature/better-index
    
    commit 6876fefcfacd45f85260b424f91ff4a02a5ae39b
    Merge: c73d9f3 c8c9c01
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Sun May 26 21:30:41 2019 +0300
    
        Merge branch 'master' into feature/better-index
    
    commit c73d9f3a015ebd61034c9630b1dae52cd18fef54
    Merge: 39f9e68 9a4ad64
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Wed May 22 21:00:29 2019 +0300
    
        Merge branch 'master' into feature/better-index
    
    commit 39f9e68cb1e87f239a2b3e8976db80c4156edf01
    Merge: 76c49b5 d53cdeb
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Mon May 13 22:07:47 2019 +0300
    
        Merge branch 'master' into feature/better-index
    
    commit 76c49b52d34e0bed9057edcf5c42870be8ab47fe
    Merge: 5ff098c 3cc2114
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Fri May 10 11:30:01 2019 +0300
    
        Merge branch 'master' into feature/better-index
    
    commit 5ff098c727f52ad5e00ca5f8c740d77778a96265
    Merge: 38f75a2 3c565ae
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Tue May 7 07:09:14 2019 +0300
    
        Merge branch 'master' into feature/better-index
    
    commit 38f75a2f87e1880303e4849c89a66a654f26c56e
    Merge: 18e40b2 8bd3278
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Mon May 6 21:29:39 2019 +0300
    
        Merge branch 'master' into feature/better-index
    
    commit 18e40b2bb4d640e149b2e15a98be5a622f8bf6a2
    Merge: 1a4ad4a 5fcb16c
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Sun May 5 20:34:57 2019 +0300
    
        Merge branch 'master' into feature/better-index
    
    commit 1a4ad4a8c0e417a4badf0eaf1fa342e7b4bc43b7
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Tue Apr 30 21:36:20 2019 +0300
    
        Finish off index improvements (we hope).
    
    commit abcf377ae763aa4eb1d01ea46d60234d12ced679
    Merge: 473d5d5 ee101d0
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Sun Apr 28 20:53:58 2019 +0300
    
        Merge branch 'master' into feature/better-index
    
    commit 473d5d54f209e5a436a97b7f97b8f7c48048edc9
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Sun Apr 28 19:48:10 2019 +0300
    
        More indexing updates.
    
    commit 34f5c17223396cae9585826bdd8d8ed9cc70198f
    Merge: 5484684 7c22237
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Sun Apr 28 19:45:38 2019 +0300
    
        Merge branch 'master' into feature/better-index
    
    commit 54846844084efcbcee650187c274ba2cae0b94d0
    Merge: dfdf503 4edf1cc
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Wed Apr 24 20:28:17 2019 +0300
    
        Merge branch 'master' into feature/better-index
    
    commit dfdf5031cea43a1d35b6cd513fa3c2692ef89a1c
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Wed Apr 24 20:25:30 2019 +0300
    
        More indexing.
    
    commit 3887537ae8fbe3e46782de5ebd350a508be202c9
    Merge: c0d4861 b5cb0d8
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Tue Apr 23 11:05:15 2019 +0300
    
        Merge branch 'master' into feature/better-index
    
    commit c0d4861e21c806b8ad61e6e3a6cdf95e4335895e
    Merge: 5fb0824 d3b5c77
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Sun Apr 21 18:03:34 2019 +0300
    
        Merge branch 'master' into feature/better-index
    
    commit 5fb082420462c7b6037d08e39944f932065816f8
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Sun Apr 21 13:47:24 2019 +0300
    
        More indexing.
    
    commit 874ac661e36b277ed145f8a29a419af6d5b728ff
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Mon Apr 15 20:55:19 2019 +0300
    
        More indexing fixes.
    
    commit 8ded83c76cba4b10377d0f2a70b24d21f18097fd
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Sun Apr 14 19:16:58 2019 +0300
    
        More indexing fixes.
    
    commit c0668e4b76ea872479dd8506037b08054555e97f
    Merge: 6a9db98 c67cff4
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Sun Apr 14 19:14:47 2019 +0300
    
        Merge branch 'master' into feature/better-index
    
    commit 6a9db98e9b184f38f93ea56f0bcfa7f7177b6ff6
    Merge: 8255dbf b4e4ba4
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Fri Apr 12 12:42:53 2019 +0300
    
        Merge branch 'master' into feature/better-index
    
    commit 8255dbfa053e78c7c05d541a842c82fb552505d5
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Thu Apr 11 21:54:56 2019 +0300
    
        More indexing fixes.
    
    commit 5a52833a68f511e77ee5120d7142124c53740b68
    Merge: 37d907a 8339e74
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Wed Apr 10 22:06:58 2019 +0300
    
        Merge branch 'master' into feature/better-index
    
    commit 37d907a755994e20ca891731a13179f76eac8332
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Mon Apr 8 21:42:47 2019 +0300
    
        Next indexing fix.
    
    commit 2cdadd3091075ffcdf4c8e3c4395b8059fc76033
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Sun Apr 7 22:01:12 2019 +0300
    
        More indexing updates.
    
    commit 2eea174133723a30a3b347bdbc93d05ac3203623
    Merge: 01af55a 1707928
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Sun Apr 7 21:58:59 2019 +0300
    
        Merge branch 'master' into feature/better-index
    
    commit 01af55a27d0bafc4d9072ffb7b038bf8c82fe985
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Fri Apr 5 10:22:50 2019 +0300
    
        Fix sidebar.awk to use @subentry.
    
    commit cab07e64da25528b986b28ab0d7f0e307da93759
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Mon Apr 1 22:41:37 2019 +0300
    
        Lots of indexing improvements.
    
    commit 332f75e995bb537642759cd301b064b3e1ed6e65
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Fri Mar 29 14:59:20 2019 +0300
    
        Start on index rework.
    
    commit 6167e5e065ecf16a8f9567046d563a89ecbf996c
    Merge: 6c6f6eb 8952c58
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Fri Mar 29 14:45:05 2019 +0300
    
        Merge branch 'master' into feature/better-index
    
    commit 6c6f6eb628de5deef8bd382b26270cf91fe82adb
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Sat Mar 9 20:47:12 2019 +0200
    
        Doc improvements w.r.t. interval expressions.
    
    commit d00a702b26ce45b3723d54f105b21181d64158ac
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Fri Mar 8 12:13:21 2019 +0200
    
        Add generated files.
    
    commit 83a5b6f87902d0a3e4cd709eabd6d88ddf471829
    Author: Arnold D. Robbins <address@hidden>
    Date:   Fri Mar 8 11:50:07 2019 +0200
    
        First pass at indexing improvements.

diff --git a/NEWS b/NEWS
index 17322c2..4c8dcdf 100644
--- a/NEWS
+++ b/NEWS
@@ -12,9 +12,13 @@ Changes from 5.0.1 to 5.1.0
 
 2. A number of memory leak issues have been fixed.
 
-3. Infrastructure upgrades: Bison 3.4.2.
+3. Infrastructure upgrades: Bison 3.4.2, Texinfo 6.7.
 
-4. Several bugs have been fixed.  See the ChangeLog for details.
+4. The indexing in the manual has been thoroughly revised, in particular
+   making use of the facilities in Texinfo 6.7.  That version (or newer)
+   must be used to format the manual.
+
+5. Several bugs have been fixed.  See the ChangeLog for details.
 
 Changes from 5.0.0 to 5.0.1
 ---------------------------
diff --git a/README b/README
index d30e3a4..964e2a9 100644
--- a/README
+++ b/README
@@ -23,8 +23,8 @@ says one thing but gawk does something different.
 
 To format the documentation with TeX, use at least version 2017-09.16
 of texinfo.tex. There is a usable copy of texinfo.tex in the doc directory.
-You should also use at least version 6.5 of texindex and of makeinfo
-from the texinfo-6.5 distribution.
+You must also use at least version 6.7 of texindex and of makeinfo
+from the texinfo-6.7 distribution.
 
 INSTALLATION:
 
diff --git a/doc/ChangeLog b/doc/ChangeLog
index 65124d1..0309296 100644
--- a/doc/ChangeLog
+++ b/doc/ChangeLog
@@ -1,3 +1,10 @@
+2019-09-24         Arnold D. Robbins     <address@hidden>
+
+       * gawktexi.in: Take advantage of new indexing features in
+       Texinfo 6.7.
+       * sidebar.awk: Ditto.
+       * texinfo.tex: Updated from Texinfo 6.7 distribution.
+
 2019-08-23         Arnold D. Robbins     <address@hidden>
 
        * awkcard.in: Fixes and updates. Some cleanup.
diff --git a/doc/gawk.info b/doc/gawk.info
index 9875a0a..fecb54f 100644
--- a/doc/gawk.info
+++ b/doc/gawk.info
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-This is gawk.info, produced by makeinfo version 6.5 from gawk.texi.
+This is gawk.info, produced by makeinfo version 6.7 from gawk.texi.
 
 Copyright (C) 1989, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1996-2005, 2007, 2009-2019
 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
@@ -960,7 +960,7 @@ became the primary maintainer.  Current development focuses 
on bug
 fixes, performance improvements, standards compliance, and,
 occasionally, new features.
 
-   In May 1997, Ju"rgen Kahrs felt the need for network access from
+   In May 1997, Jürgen Kahrs felt the need for network access from
 'awk', and with a little help from me, set about adding features to do
 this for 'gawk'.  At that time, he also wrote the bulk of 'TCP/IP
 Internetworking with 'gawk'' (a separate document, available as part of
@@ -1365,13 +1365,13 @@ acknowledgements:
 
    Dr. Nelson Beebe, Andreas Buening, Dr. Manuel Collado, Antonio
 Colombo, Stephen Davies, Scott Deifik, Akim Demaille, Daniel Richard G.,
-Juan Manuel Guerrero, Darrel Hankerson, Michal Jaegermann, Ju"rgen
-Kahrs, Stepan Kasal, John Malmberg, Dave Pitts, Chet Ramey, Pat Rankin,
-Andrew Schorr, Corinna Vinschen, and Eli Zaretskii (in alphabetical
-order) make up the current 'gawk' "crack portability team."  Without
-their hard work and help, 'gawk' would not be nearly the robust,
-portable program it is today.  It has been and continues to be a
-pleasure working with this team of fine people.
+Juan Manuel Guerrero, Darrel Hankerson, Michal Jaegermann, Jürgen Kahrs,
+Stepan Kasal, John Malmberg, Dave Pitts, Chet Ramey, Pat Rankin, Andrew
+Schorr, Corinna Vinschen, and Eli Zaretskii (in alphabetical order) make
+up the current 'gawk' "crack portability team."  Without their hard work
+and help, 'gawk' would not be nearly the robust, portable program it is
+today.  It has been and continues to be a pleasure working with this
+team of fine people.
 
    Notable code and documentation contributions were made by a number of
 people.  *Note Contributors:: for the full list.
@@ -2805,6 +2805,10 @@ The following list describes options mandated by the 
POSIX standard:
      respect to whatever the Free Software Foundation is currently
      distributing.  It is also useful for bug reports (*note Bugs::).
 
+'--'
+     Mark the end of all options.  Any command-line arguments following
+     '--' are placed in 'ARGV', even if they start with a minus sign.
+
    As long as program text has been supplied, any other options are
 flagged as invalid with a warning message but are otherwise ignored.
 
@@ -3977,7 +3981,7 @@ These apply to non-ASCII character sets, which can have 
single symbols
 (called "collating elements") that are represented with more than one
 character.  They can also have several characters that are equivalent
 for "collating", or sorting, purposes.  (For example, in French, a plain
-"e" and a grave-accented "e`" are equivalent.)  These sequences are:
+"e" and a grave-accented "è" are equivalent.)  These sequences are:
 
 Collating symbols
      Multicharacter collating elements enclosed between '[.' and '.]'.
@@ -3988,9 +3992,9 @@ Collating symbols
 Equivalence classes
      Locale-specific names for a list of characters that are equal.  The
      name is enclosed between '[=' and '=]'.  For example, the name 'e'
-     might be used to represent all of "e," "e^," "e`," and "e'."  In
-     this case, '[[=e=]]' is a regexp that matches any of 'e', 'e^',
-     'e'', or 'e`'.
+     might be used to represent all of "e," "ê," "è," and "é."  In this
+     case, '[[=e=]]' is a regexp that matches any of 'e', 'ê', 'é', or
+     'è'.
 
    These features are very valuable in non-English-speaking locales.
 
@@ -25787,7 +25791,7 @@ was discussed earlier, in *note General Data Types::.
      may not be updated.
 
    It is not obvious at first glance how to work with scalar cookies or
-what their raison d'e^tre really is.  In theory, the 'sym_lookup()' and
+what their raison d'être really is.  In theory, the 'sym_lookup()' and
 'sym_update()' routines are all you really need to work with variables.
 For example, you might have code that looks up the value of a variable,
 evaluates a condition, and then possibly changes the value of the
@@ -29265,7 +29269,7 @@ Info file, in approximate chronological order:
      dynamically adding new functions.  (This was obsoleted at 'gawk'
      4.1.)
 
-   * Ju"rgen Kahrs contributed the initial version of the TCP/IP
+   * Jürgen Kahrs contributed the initial version of the TCP/IP
      networking code and documentation, and motivated the inclusion of
      the '|&' operator.
 
@@ -30056,6 +30060,9 @@ Cygwin is the same as for a Unix system:
 on Cygwin takes considerably longer.  However, it does finish, and then
 the 'make' proceeds as usual.
 
+   You may also install 'gawk' using the regular Cygwin installer.  In
+general Cygwin supplies the latest released version.
+
    Recent versions of Cygwin open all files in binary mode.  This means
 that you should use 'RS = "\r?\n"' in order to be able to handle
 standard MS-Windows text files with carriage-return plus line-feed line
@@ -33637,80 +33644,81 @@ Index
 [index]
 * Menu:
 
-* ! (exclamation point), ! operator:     Boolean Ops.         (line  69)
-* ! (exclamation point), ! operator <1>: Precedence.          (line  51)
-* ! (exclamation point), ! operator <2>: Ranges.              (line  47)
-* ! (exclamation point), ! operator <3>: Egrep Program.       (line 174)
-* ! (exclamation point), != operator:    Comparison Operators.
-                                                              (line  11)
-* ! (exclamation point), != operator <1>: Precedence.         (line  64)
 * ! (exclamation point), !~ operator:    Regexp Usage.        (line  19)
 * ! (exclamation point), !~ operator <1>: Computed Regexps.   (line   6)
 * ! (exclamation point), !~ operator <2>: Case-sensitivity.   (line  26)
 * ! (exclamation point), !~ operator <3>: Regexp Constants.   (line   6)
+* ! (exclamation point), != operator:    Comparison Operators.
+                                                              (line  11)
 * ! (exclamation point), !~ operator <4>: Comparison Operators.
                                                               (line  11)
 * ! (exclamation point), !~ operator <5>: Comparison Operators.
                                                               (line  98)
+* ! (exclamation point), ! operator:     Boolean Ops.         (line  69)
+* ! (exclamation point), ! operator <1>: Precedence.          (line  51)
+* ! (exclamation point), != operator <1>: Precedence.         (line  64)
 * ! (exclamation point), !~ operator <6>: Precedence.         (line  79)
 * ! (exclamation point), !~ operator <7>: Expression Patterns.
                                                               (line  24)
-* " (double quote), in regexp constants: Computed Regexps.    (line  30)
+* ! (exclamation point), ! operator <2>: Ranges.              (line  47)
+* ! (exclamation point), ! operator <3>: Egrep Program.       (line 174)
 * " (double quote), in shell commands:   Quoting.             (line  54)
+* " (double quote), in regexp constants: Computed Regexps.    (line  30)
 * # (number sign), #! (executable scripts): Executable Scripts.
                                                               (line   6)
 * # (number sign), commenting:           Comments.            (line   6)
+* $ (dollar sign), regexp operator:      Regexp Operator Details.
+                                                              (line  31)
 * $ (dollar sign), $ field operator:     Fields.              (line  19)
-* $ (dollar sign), $ field operator <1>: Precedence.          (line  42)
 * $ (dollar sign), incrementing fields and arrays: Increment Ops.
                                                               (line  30)
-* $ (dollar sign), regexp operator:      Regexp Operator Details.
-                                                              (line  31)
-* % (percent sign), % operator:          Precedence.          (line  54)
+* $ (dollar sign), $ field operator <1>: Precedence.          (line  42)
 * % (percent sign), %= operator:         Assignment Ops.      (line 129)
+* % (percent sign), % operator:          Precedence.          (line  54)
 * % (percent sign), %= operator <1>:     Precedence.          (line  94)
 * & (ampersand), && operator:            Boolean Ops.         (line  59)
 * & (ampersand), && operator <1>:        Precedence.          (line  85)
 * & (ampersand), gsub()/gensub()/sub() functions and: Gory Details.
                                                               (line   6)
 * ' (single quote):                      One-shot.            (line  15)
-* ' (single quote) in gawk command lines: Long.               (line  35)
-* ' (single quote), in shell commands:   Quoting.             (line  48)
+* ' (single quote), in gawk command lines: Long.              (line  35)
 * ' (single quote), vs. apostrophe:      Comments.            (line  27)
+* ' (single quote), in shell commands:   Quoting.             (line  48)
 * ' (single quote), with double quotes:  Quoting.             (line  73)
-* () (parentheses), in a profile:        Profiling.           (line 146)
 * () (parentheses), regexp operator:     Regexp Operator Details.
                                                               (line  77)
-* * (asterisk), * operator, as multiplication operator: Precedence.
-                                                              (line  54)
+* () (parentheses), in a profile:        Profiling.           (line 146)
 * * (asterisk), * operator, as regexp operator: Regexp Operator Details.
                                                               (line  91)
-* * (asterisk), * operator, null strings, matching: String Functions.
-                                                              (line 542)
 * * (asterisk), ** operator:             Arithmetic Ops.      (line  81)
-* * (asterisk), ** operator <1>:         Precedence.          (line  48)
-* * (asterisk), **= operator:            Assignment Ops.      (line 129)
-* * (asterisk), **= operator <1>:        Precedence.          (line  94)
 * * (asterisk), *= operator:             Assignment Ops.      (line 129)
+* * (asterisk), **= operator:            Assignment Ops.      (line 129)
+* * (asterisk), ** operator <1>:         Precedence.          (line  48)
+* * (asterisk), * operator, as multiplication operator: Precedence.
+                                                              (line  54)
 * * (asterisk), *= operator <1>:         Precedence.          (line  94)
-* + (plus sign), + operator:             Precedence.          (line  51)
-* + (plus sign), + operator <1>:         Precedence.          (line  57)
+* * (asterisk), **= operator <1>:        Precedence.          (line  94)
+* * (asterisk), * operator, null strings, matching: String Functions.
+                                                              (line 542)
+* + (plus sign), regexp operator:        Regexp Operator Details.
+                                                              (line 107)
+* + (plus sign), += operator:            Assignment Ops.      (line  81)
 * + (plus sign), ++ operator:            Increment Ops.       (line  11)
 * + (plus sign), ++ operator <1>:        Increment Ops.       (line  40)
 * + (plus sign), ++ operator <2>:        Precedence.          (line  45)
-* + (plus sign), += operator:            Assignment Ops.      (line  81)
+* + (plus sign), + operator:             Precedence.          (line  51)
+* + (plus sign), + operator <1>:         Precedence.          (line  57)
 * + (plus sign), += operator <1>:        Precedence.          (line  94)
-* + (plus sign), regexp operator:        Regexp Operator Details.
-                                                              (line 107)
 * , (comma), in range patterns:          Ranges.              (line   6)
-* - (hyphen), - operator:                Precedence.          (line  51)
-* - (hyphen), - operator <1>:            Precedence.          (line  57)
+* - (hyphen), file names beginning with: Options.             (line  64)
+* - (hyphen), -- end of options marker:  Options.             (line 336)
+* - (hyphen), in bracket expressions:    Bracket Expressions. (line  25)
+* - (hyphen), -= operator:               Assignment Ops.      (line 129)
 * - (hyphen), -- operator:               Increment Ops.       (line  48)
 * - (hyphen), -- operator <1>:           Precedence.          (line  45)
-* - (hyphen), -= operator:               Assignment Ops.      (line 129)
+* - (hyphen), - operator:                Precedence.          (line  51)
+* - (hyphen), - operator <1>:            Precedence.          (line  57)
 * - (hyphen), -= operator <1>:           Precedence.          (line  94)
-* - (hyphen), file names beginning with: Options.             (line  64)
-* - (hyphen), in bracket expressions:    Bracket Expressions. (line  25)
 * --assign option:                       Options.             (line  36)
 * --bignum option:                       Options.             (line 230)
 * --characters-as-bytes option:          Options.             (line  73)
@@ -33754,11 +33762,11 @@ Index
 * --profile option <1>:                  Profiling.           (line  12)
 * --re-interval option:                  Options.             (line 304)
 * --sandbox option:                      Options.             (line 316)
-* --sandbox option, disabling system() function: I/O Functions.
-                                                              (line 128)
 * --sandbox option, input redirection with getline: Getline.  (line  19)
 * --sandbox option, output redirection with print, printf: Redirection.
                                                               (line   6)
+* --sandbox option, disabling system() function: I/O Functions.
+                                                              (line 128)
 * --source option:                       Options.             (line 121)
 * --traditional option:                  Options.             (line  86)
 * --traditional option, --posix option and: Options.          (line 298)
@@ -33771,14 +33779,14 @@ Index
 * -D option:                             Options.             (line 112)
 * -e option:                             Options.             (line 121)
 * -E option:                             Options.             (line 147)
-* -e option <1>:                         Options.             (line 367)
+* -e option <1>:                         Options.             (line 371)
 * -f option:                             Long.                (line  12)
 * -F option:                             Options.             (line  21)
 * -f option <1>:                         Options.             (line  25)
-* -F option, -Ft sets FS to TAB:         Options.             (line 339)
+* -F option, -Ft sets FS to TAB:         Options.             (line 343)
+* -f option, multiple uses:              Options.             (line 348)
 * -F option, command-line:               Command Line Field Separator.
                                                               (line   6)
-* -f option, multiple uses:              Options.             (line 344)
 * -g option:                             Options.             (line 169)
 * -h option:                             Options.             (line 176)
 * -i option:                             Options.             (line 181)
@@ -33809,147 +33817,150 @@ Index
 * .po files <1>:                         Translator i18n.     (line   6)
 * .po files, converting to .mo:          I18N Example.        (line  80)
 * .pot files:                            Explaining gettext.  (line  31)
-* / (forward slash) to enclose regular expressions: Regexp.   (line  10)
-* / (forward slash), / operator:         Precedence.          (line  54)
+* / (forward slash), to enclose regular expressions: Regexp.  (line  10)
 * / (forward slash), /= operator:        Assignment Ops.      (line 129)
-* / (forward slash), /= operator <1>:    Precedence.          (line  94)
-* / (forward slash), /= operator, vs. /=.../ regexp constant: Assignment Ops.
+* / (forward slash), /= operator, vs.  /=.../ regexp constant: Assignment Ops.
                                                               (line 149)
+* / (forward slash), / operator:         Precedence.          (line  54)
+* / (forward slash), /= operator <1>:    Precedence.          (line  94)
 * / (forward slash), patterns and:       Expression Patterns. (line  24)
 * /= operator vs. /=.../ regexp constant: Assignment Ops.     (line 149)
-* /dev/... special files:                Special FD.          (line  48)
 * /dev/fd/N special files (gawk):        Special FD.          (line  48)
+* /dev/... special files:                Special FD.          (line  48)
 * /inet/... special files (gawk):        TCP/IP Networking.   (line   6)
 * /inet4/... special files (gawk):       TCP/IP Networking.   (line   6)
 * /inet6/... special files (gawk):       TCP/IP Networking.   (line   6)
 * : (colon), ?: operator:                Precedence.          (line  91)
-* ::, namespace separator:               Qualified Names.     (line   6)
-* ; (semicolon), AWKPATH variable and:   PC Using.            (line  13)
-* ; (semicolon), separating rules:       Statements/Lines.    (line  90)
+* : (colon), :: namespace separator:     Qualified Names.     (line   6)
 * ; (semicolon), separating statements in actions: Statements/Lines.
                                                               (line  90)
+* ; (semicolon), separating rules:       Statements/Lines.    (line  90)
 * ; (semicolon), separating statements in actions <1>: Action Overview.
                                                               (line  19)
 * ; (semicolon), separating statements in actions <2>: Statements.
                                                               (line  10)
+* ; (semicolon), AWKPATH variable and:   PC Using.            (line  13)
+* < (left angle bracket), < operator (I/O): Getline/File.     (line   6)
 * < (left angle bracket), < operator:    Comparison Operators.
                                                               (line  11)
-* < (left angle bracket), < operator <1>: Precedence.         (line  64)
-* < (left angle bracket), < operator (I/O): Getline/File.     (line   6)
 * < (left angle bracket), <= operator:   Comparison Operators.
                                                               (line  11)
+* < (left angle bracket), < operator <1>: Precedence.         (line  64)
 * < (left angle bracket), <= operator <1>: Precedence.        (line  64)
 * = (equals sign), = operator:           Assignment Ops.      (line   6)
 * = (equals sign), == operator:          Comparison Operators.
                                                               (line  11)
 * = (equals sign), == operator <1>:      Precedence.          (line  64)
-* > (right angle bracket), > operator:   Comparison Operators.
-                                                              (line  11)
-* > (right angle bracket), > operator <1>: Precedence.        (line  64)
 * > (right angle bracket), > operator (I/O): Redirection.     (line  22)
+* > (right angle bracket), >> operator (I/O): Redirection.    (line  50)
 * > (right angle bracket), >= operator:  Comparison Operators.
                                                               (line  11)
+* > (right angle bracket), > operator:   Comparison Operators.
+                                                              (line  11)
 * > (right angle bracket), >= operator <1>: Precedence.       (line  64)
-* > (right angle bracket), >> operator (I/O): Redirection.    (line  50)
+* > (right angle bracket), > operator <1>: Precedence.        (line  64)
 * > (right angle bracket), >> operator (I/O) <1>: Precedence. (line  64)
-* ? (question mark), ?: operator:        Precedence.          (line  91)
 * ? (question mark), regexp operator:    Regexp Operator Details.
                                                               (line 113)
 * ? (question mark), regexp operator <1>: GNU Regexp Operators.
                                                               (line  62)
-* @-notation for indirect function calls: Indirect Calls.     (line  47)
-* @include directive:                    Include Files.       (line   8)
-* @load directive:                       Loading Shared Libraries.
+* ? (question mark), ?: operator:        Precedence.          (line  91)
+* @ (at-sign), @include directive:       Include Files.       (line   8)
+* @ (at-sign), @load directive:          Loading Shared Libraries.
                                                               (line   8)
-* @namespace directive:                  Changing The Namespace.
+* @ (at-sign), @-notation for indirect function calls: Indirect Calls.
+                                                              (line  47)
+* @ (at-sign), @namespace directive:     Changing The Namespace.
                                                               (line   6)
-* @namespace, no effect on BEGIN, BEGINFILE, END, and ENDFILE: Changing The 
Namespace.
+* @ (at-sign), @namespace directive, BEGIN, BEGINFILE, END, ENDFILE and: 
Changing The Namespace.
                                                               (line  37)
 * [] (square brackets), regexp operator: Regexp Operator Details.
                                                               (line  52)
 * \ (backslash):                         Comments.            (line  50)
-* \ (backslash), as field separator:     Command Line Field Separator.
-                                                              (line  24)
+* \ (backslash), in shell commands:      Quoting.             (line  48)
 * \ (backslash), continuing lines and:   Statements/Lines.    (line  19)
-* \ (backslash), continuing lines and, comments and: Statements/Lines.
-                                                              (line  75)
 * \ (backslash), continuing lines and, in csh: Statements/Lines.
                                                               (line  43)
-* \ (backslash), gsub()/gensub()/sub() functions and: Gory Details.
-                                                              (line   6)
-* \ (backslash), in bracket expressions: Bracket Expressions. (line  25)
+* \ (backslash), continuing lines and, comments and: Statements/Lines.
+                                                              (line  75)
 * \ (backslash), in escape sequences:    Escape Sequences.    (line   6)
-* \ (backslash), in escape sequences <1>: Escape Sequences.   (line 103)
-* \ (backslash), in escape sequences, POSIX and: Escape Sequences.
-                                                              (line 108)
-* \ (backslash), in regexp constants:    Computed Regexps.    (line  30)
-* \ (backslash), in shell commands:      Quoting.             (line  48)
-* \ (backslash), regexp operator:        Regexp Operator Details.
-                                                              (line  14)
-* \ (backslash), \" escape sequence:     Escape Sequences.    (line  85)
-* \ (backslash), \' operator (gawk):     GNU Regexp Operators.
-                                                              (line  59)
-* \ (backslash), \/ escape sequence:     Escape Sequences.    (line  76)
-* \ (backslash), \< operator (gawk):     GNU Regexp Operators.
-                                                              (line  33)
-* \ (backslash), \> operator (gawk):     GNU Regexp Operators.
-                                                              (line  37)
 * \ (backslash), \a escape sequence:     Escape Sequences.    (line  34)
 * \ (backslash), \b escape sequence:     Escape Sequences.    (line  38)
-* \ (backslash), \B operator (gawk):     GNU Regexp Operators.
-                                                              (line  46)
 * \ (backslash), \f escape sequence:     Escape Sequences.    (line  41)
 * \ (backslash), \n escape sequence:     Escape Sequences.    (line  44)
-* \ (backslash), \NNN escape sequence:   Escape Sequences.    (line  56)
 * \ (backslash), \r escape sequence:     Escape Sequences.    (line  47)
+* \ (backslash), \t escape sequence:     Escape Sequences.    (line  50)
+* \ (backslash), \v escape sequence:     Escape Sequences.    (line  53)
+* \ (backslash), \NNN escape sequence:   Escape Sequences.    (line  56)
+* \ (backslash), \x escape sequence:     Escape Sequences.    (line  61)
+* \ (backslash), \/ escape sequence:     Escape Sequences.    (line  76)
+* \ (backslash), \" escape sequence:     Escape Sequences.    (line  85)
+* \ (backslash), in escape sequences <1>: Escape Sequences.   (line 103)
+* \ (backslash), in escape sequences, POSIX and: Escape Sequences.
+                                                              (line 108)
+* \ (backslash), regexp operator:        Regexp Operator Details.
+                                                              (line  14)
+* \ (backslash), in bracket expressions: Bracket Expressions. (line  25)
+* \ (backslash), in regexp constants:    Computed Regexps.    (line  30)
 * \ (backslash), \s operator (gawk):     GNU Regexp Operators.
                                                               (line  13)
 * \ (backslash), \S operator (gawk):     GNU Regexp Operators.
                                                               (line  17)
-* \ (backslash), \t escape sequence:     Escape Sequences.    (line  50)
-* \ (backslash), \v escape sequence:     Escape Sequences.    (line  53)
 * \ (backslash), \w operator (gawk):     GNU Regexp Operators.
                                                               (line  22)
 * \ (backslash), \W operator (gawk):     GNU Regexp Operators.
                                                               (line  28)
-* \ (backslash), \x escape sequence:     Escape Sequences.    (line  61)
+* \ (backslash), \< operator (gawk):     GNU Regexp Operators.
+                                                              (line  33)
+* \ (backslash), \> operator (gawk):     GNU Regexp Operators.
+                                                              (line  37)
 * \ (backslash), \y operator (gawk):     GNU Regexp Operators.
                                                               (line  41)
+* \ (backslash), \B operator (gawk):     GNU Regexp Operators.
+                                                              (line  46)
 * \ (backslash), \` operator (gawk):     GNU Regexp Operators.
                                                               (line  57)
-* ^ (caret), in bracket expressions:     Bracket Expressions. (line  25)
-* ^ (caret), in FS:                      Regexp Field Splitting.
+* \ (backslash), \' operator (gawk):     GNU Regexp Operators.
                                                               (line  59)
+* \ (backslash), as field separator:     Command Line Field Separator.
+                                                              (line  24)
+* \ (backslash), gsub()/gensub()/sub() functions and: Gory Details.
+                                                              (line   6)
 * ^ (caret), regexp operator:            Regexp Operator Details.
                                                               (line  18)
+* ^ (caret), in bracket expressions:     Bracket Expressions. (line  25)
 * ^ (caret), regexp operator <1>:        GNU Regexp Operators.
                                                               (line  62)
-* ^ (caret), ^ operator:                 Precedence.          (line  48)
+* ^ (caret), in FS:                      Regexp Field Splitting.
+                                                              (line  59)
 * ^ (caret), ^= operator:                Assignment Ops.      (line 129)
+* ^ (caret), ^ operator:                 Precedence.          (line  48)
 * ^ (caret), ^= operator <1>:            Precedence.          (line  94)
-* _ (underscore), C macro:               Explaining gettext.  (line  71)
 * _ (underscore), in names of private variables: Library Names.
                                                               (line  29)
-* _ (underscore), translatable string:   Programmer i18n.     (line  69)
+* _ (underscore), C macro:               Explaining gettext.  (line  71)
+* _ (underscore), translatable strings:  Programmer i18n.     (line  69)
 * _gr_init() user-defined function:      Group Functions.     (line  83)
 * _ord_init() user-defined function:     Ordinal Functions.   (line  16)
 * _pw_init() user-defined function:      Passwd Functions.    (line 105)
-* {} (braces):                           Profiling.           (line 142)
+* {} (braces), regexp operator:          Regexp Operator Details.
+                                                              (line 118)
 * {} (braces), actions and:              Action Overview.     (line  19)
 * {} (braces), statements, grouping:     Statements.          (line  10)
+* {} (braces):                           Profiling.           (line 142)
 * | (vertical bar):                      Regexp Operator Details.
                                                               (line  66)
 * | (vertical bar), | operator (I/O):    Getline/Pipe.        (line  10)
-* | (vertical bar), | operator (I/O) <1>: Redirection.        (line  57)
-* | (vertical bar), | operator (I/O) <2>: Precedence.         (line  64)
 * | (vertical bar), |& operator (I/O):   Getline/Coprocess.   (line   6)
+* | (vertical bar), | operator (I/O) <1>: Redirection.        (line  57)
 * | (vertical bar), |& operator (I/O) <1>: Redirection.       (line  96)
-* | (vertical bar), |& operator (I/O) <2>: Precedence.        (line  64)
-* | (vertical bar), |& operator (I/O) <3>: Two-way I/O.       (line  27)
 * | (vertical bar), |& operator (I/O), pipes, closing: Close Files And Pipes.
                                                               (line 120)
 * | (vertical bar), || operator:         Boolean Ops.         (line  59)
+* | (vertical bar), | operator (I/O) <2>: Precedence.         (line  64)
+* | (vertical bar), |& operator (I/O) <2>: Precedence.        (line  64)
 * | (vertical bar), || operator <1>:     Precedence.          (line  88)
+* | (vertical bar), |& operator (I/O) <3>: Two-way I/O.       (line  27)
 * ~ (tilde), ~ operator:                 Regexp Usage.        (line  19)
 * ~ (tilde), ~ operator <1>:             Computed Regexps.    (line   6)
 * ~ (tilde), ~ operator <2>:             Case-sensitivity.    (line  26)
@@ -33960,31 +33971,33 @@ Index
                                                               (line  98)
 * ~ (tilde), ~ operator <6>:             Precedence.          (line  79)
 * ~ (tilde), ~ operator <7>:             Expression Patterns. (line  24)
+* aaa (amazing awk assembler) program:   Glossary.            (line  16)
 * accessing fields:                      Fields.              (line   6)
 * accessing global variables from extensions: Symbol Table Access.
                                                               (line   6)
 * account information:                   Passwd Functions.    (line  16)
 * account information <1>:               Group Functions.     (line   6)
-* actions:                               Action Overview.     (line   6)
-* actions, control statements in:        Statements.          (line   6)
 * actions, default:                      Very Simple.         (line  35)
 * actions, empty:                        Very Simple.         (line  40)
+* actions:                               Action Overview.     (line   6)
+* actions, control statements in:        Statements.          (line   6)
 * Ada programming language:              Glossary.            (line  11)
-* adding, features to gawk:              Adding Code.         (line   6)
 * adding, fields:                        Changing Fields.     (line  53)
+* adding, features to gawk:              Adding Code.         (line   6)
 * advanced features, fixed-width data:   Constant Size.       (line   6)
+* advanced features, specifying field content: Splitting By Content.
+                                                              (line   9)
 * advanced features, gawk:               Advanced Features.   (line   6)
-* advanced features, network programming: TCP/IP Networking.  (line   6)
 * advanced features, nondecimal input data: Nondecimal Data.  (line   6)
 * advanced features, processes, communicating with: Two-way I/O.
                                                               (line   6)
-* advanced features, specifying field content: Splitting By Content.
-                                                              (line   9)
+* advanced features, network programming: TCP/IP Networking.  (line   6)
 * Aho, Alfred:                           History.             (line  17)
 * Aho, Alfred <1>:                       Contributors.        (line  12)
 * alarm clock example program:           Alarm Program.       (line  11)
 * alarm.awk program:                     Alarm Program.       (line  31)
 * algorithms:                            Basic High Level.    (line  57)
+* all source files, show in debugger:    Debugger Info.       (line  45)
 * allocating memory for extensions:      Memory Allocation Functions.
                                                               (line   6)
 * amazing awk assembler (aaa):           Glossary.            (line  16)
@@ -34001,29 +34014,29 @@ Index
 * AND bitwise operation:                 Bitwise Functions.   (line   6)
 * and Boolean-logic operator:            Boolean Ops.         (line   6)
 * ANSI:                                  Glossary.            (line  32)
-* API informational variables:           Extension API Informational Variables.
+* API, version:                          Extension Versioning.
                                                               (line   6)
-* API version:                           Extension Versioning.
+* API, informational variables:          Extension API Informational Variables.
                                                               (line   6)
 * arbitrary precision:                   Arbitrary Precision Arithmetic.
                                                               (line   6)
 * arbitrary precision <1>:               Computer Arithmetic. (line  61)
-* arbitrary precision integers:          Arbitrary Precision Integers.
+* arbitrary precision, integers:         Arbitrary Precision Integers.
                                                               (line   6)
 * archaeologists:                        Bugs.                (line   6)
 * arctangent:                            Numeric Functions.   (line  12)
-* ARGC/ARGV variables:                   Auto-set.            (line  15)
+* ARGC/ARGV variables, portability and:  Executable Scripts.  (line  59)
 * ARGC/ARGV variables, command-line arguments: Other Arguments.
                                                               (line  21)
+* ARGC/ARGV variables:                   Auto-set.            (line  15)
 * ARGC/ARGV variables, how to use:       ARGC and ARGV.       (line   6)
-* ARGC/ARGV variables, portability and:  Executable Scripts.  (line  59)
-* ARGIND variable:                       Auto-set.            (line  44)
 * ARGIND variable, command-line arguments: Other Arguments.   (line  21)
+* ARGIND variable:                       Auto-set.            (line  44)
+* arguments, command-line, invoking awk: Command Line.        (line   6)
 * arguments, command-line:               Other Arguments.     (line   6)
+* arguments, in function calls:          Function Calls.      (line  18)
 * arguments, command-line <1>:           Auto-set.            (line  15)
 * arguments, command-line <2>:           ARGC and ARGV.       (line   6)
-* arguments, command-line, invoking awk: Command Line.        (line   6)
-* arguments, in function calls:          Function Calls.      (line  18)
 * arguments, processing:                 Getopt Function.     (line   6)
 * ARGV array:                            Options.             (line 316)
 * ARGV array, indexing into:             Other Arguments.     (line  21)
@@ -34033,144 +34046,170 @@ Index
                                                               (line   6)
 * array scanning order, controlling:     Controlling Scanning.
                                                               (line  14)
-* array subscripts, null strings as:     Uninitialized Subscripts.
-                                                              (line  43)
 * array subscripts, numbers as:          Numeric Array Subscripts.
                                                               (line   6)
-* array, number of elements:             String Functions.    (line 201)
+* array subscripts, null string as:      Uninitialized Subscripts.
+                                                              (line  43)
 * arrays:                                Arrays.              (line   6)
-* arrays of arrays:                      Arrays of Arrays.    (line   6)
-* arrays, an example of using:           Array Example.       (line   6)
-* arrays, as parameters to functions:    Pass By Value/Reference.
-                                                              (line  44)
+* arrays, indexing:                      Array Intro.         (line  48)
 * arrays, associative:                   Array Intro.         (line  48)
-* arrays, associative, library functions and: Library Names.  (line  58)
-* arrays, deleting entire contents:      Delete.              (line  39)
-* arrays, elements that don't exist:     Reference to Elements.
+* arrays, sparse:                        Array Intro.         (line  76)
+* arrays, IGNORECASE variable and:       Array Intro.         (line 100)
+* arrays, referencing elements:          Reference to Elements.
+                                                              (line   6)
+* arrays, unassigned elements:           Reference to Elements.
+                                                              (line  18)
+* arrays, elements, that don't exist:    Reference to Elements.
                                                               (line  23)
 * arrays, elements, assigning values:    Assigning Elements.  (line   6)
-* arrays, elements, deleting:            Delete.              (line   6)
+* arrays, example of using:              Array Example.       (line   6)
+* arrays, scanning:                      Scanning an Array.   (line   6)
+* arrays, for statement and:             Scanning an Array.   (line  20)
 * arrays, elements, order of access by in operator: Scanning an Array.
                                                               (line  48)
-* arrays, elements, retrieving number of: String Functions.   (line  42)
-* arrays, for statement and:             Scanning an Array.   (line  20)
-* arrays, IGNORECASE variable and:       Array Intro.         (line 100)
-* arrays, indexing:                      Array Intro.         (line  48)
-* arrays, merging into strings:          Join Function.       (line   6)
-* arrays, multidimensional:              Multidimensional.    (line  10)
-* arrays, multidimensional, scanning:    Multiscanning.       (line  11)
 * arrays, numeric subscripts:            Numeric Array Subscripts.
                                                               (line   6)
-* arrays, referencing elements:          Reference to Elements.
+* arrays, subscripts, uninitialized variables as: Uninitialized Subscripts.
                                                               (line   6)
-* arrays, scanning:                      Scanning an Array.   (line   6)
-* arrays, sorting:                       Array Sorting Functions.
+* arrays, elements, deleting:            Delete.              (line   6)
+* arrays, deleting entire contents:      Delete.              (line  39)
+* arrays, multidimensional:              Multidimensional.    (line  10)
+* arrays, multidimensional, scanning:    Multiscanning.       (line  11)
+* arrays, arrays of arrays:              Arrays of Arrays.    (line   6)
+* arrays, elements, retrieving number of: String Functions.   (line  42)
+* arrays, number of elements:            String Functions.    (line 201)
+* arrays, as parameters to functions:    Pass By Value/Reference.
+                                                              (line  44)
+* arrays, associative, library functions and: Library Names.  (line  58)
+* arrays, merging into strings:          Join Function.       (line   6)
+* arrays, sorting, asort() function (gawk): Array Sorting Functions.
+                                                              (line   6)
+* arrays, sorting, asorti() function (gawk): Array Sorting Functions.
                                                               (line   6)
 * arrays, sorting, IGNORECASE variable and: Array Sorting Functions.
                                                               (line  83)
-* arrays, sparse:                        Array Intro.         (line  76)
-* arrays, subscripts, uninitialized variables as: Uninitialized Subscripts.
-                                                              (line   6)
-* arrays, unassigned elements:           Reference to Elements.
-                                                              (line  18)
 * artificial intelligence, gawk and:     Distribution contents.
                                                               (line  58)
-* ASCII:                                 Ordinal Functions.   (line  45)
-* ASCII <1>:                             Glossary.            (line 194)
+* ASCII:                                 Escape Sequences.    (line  31)
+* ASCII <1>:                             Bracket Expressions. (line  79)
+* ASCII <2>:                             Scalar Constants.    (line  20)
+* ASCII <3>:                             Ordinal Functions.   (line  45)
+* ASCII <4>:                             Alarm Program.       (line  20)
+* ASCII <5>:                             Two-way I/O.         (line  95)
+* ASCII <6>:                             Ranges and Locales.  (line  10)
+* ASCII <7>:                             Ranges and Locales.  (line  61)
+* ASCII <8>:                             History summary.     (line  20)
+* ASCII <9>:                             Glossary.            (line 194)
+* ASCII <10>:                            Glossary.            (line 320)
 * asort:                                 String Functions.    (line  42)
 * asort <1>:                             Array Sorting Functions.
                                                               (line   6)
 * asort() function (gawk), arrays, sorting: Array Sorting Functions.
                                                               (line   6)
+* asort() function (gawk), side effects: Array Sorting Functions.
+                                                              (line   6)
 * asorti:                                String Functions.    (line  42)
 * asorti <1>:                            Array Sorting Functions.
                                                               (line   6)
 * asorti() function (gawk), arrays, sorting: Array Sorting Functions.
                                                               (line   6)
+* asorti() function (gawk), side effects: Array Sorting Functions.
+                                                              (line   6)
 * assert() function (C library):         Assert Function.     (line   6)
 * assert() user-defined function:        Assert Function.     (line  28)
 * assertions:                            Assert Function.     (line   6)
 * assign values to variables, in debugger: Viewing And Changing Data.
                                                               (line  62)
 * assignment operators:                  Assignment Ops.      (line   6)
-* assignment operators, evaluation order: Assignment Ops.     (line 110)
 * assignment operators, lvalues/rvalues: Assignment Ops.      (line  31)
+* assignment operators, evaluation order: Assignment Ops.     (line 110)
 * assignments as file names:             Ignoring Assigns.    (line   6)
 * associative arrays:                    Array Intro.         (line  48)
-* asterisk (*), * operator, as multiplication operator: Precedence.
-                                                              (line  54)
 * asterisk (*), * operator, as regexp operator: Regexp Operator Details.
                                                               (line  91)
-* asterisk (*), * operator, null strings, matching: String Functions.
-                                                              (line 542)
 * asterisk (*), ** operator:             Arithmetic Ops.      (line  81)
-* asterisk (*), ** operator <1>:         Precedence.          (line  48)
-* asterisk (*), **= operator:            Assignment Ops.      (line 129)
-* asterisk (*), **= operator <1>:        Precedence.          (line  94)
 * asterisk (*), *= operator:             Assignment Ops.      (line 129)
+* asterisk (*), **= operator:            Assignment Ops.      (line 129)
+* asterisk (*), ** operator <1>:         Precedence.          (line  48)
+* asterisk (*), * operator, as multiplication operator: Precedence.
+                                                              (line  54)
 * asterisk (*), *= operator <1>:         Precedence.          (line  94)
+* asterisk (*), **= operator <1>:        Precedence.          (line  94)
+* asterisk (*), * operator, null strings, matching: String Functions.
+                                                              (line 542)
+* at-sign (@), @include directive:       Include Files.       (line   8)
+* at-sign (@), @load directive:          Loading Shared Libraries.
+                                                              (line   8)
+* at-sign (@), @-notation for indirect function calls: Indirect Calls.
+                                                              (line  47)
+* at-sign (@), @namespace directive:     Changing The Namespace.
+                                                              (line   6)
+* at-sign (@), @namespace directive, BEGIN, BEGINFILE, END, ENDFILE and: 
Changing The Namespace.
+                                                              (line  37)
 * atan2:                                 Numeric Functions.   (line  12)
 * automatic displays, in debugger:       Debugger Info.       (line  24)
 * awf (amazingly workable formatter) program: Glossary.       (line  23)
-* awk debugging, enabling:               Options.             (line 112)
-* awk language, POSIX version:           Assignment Ops.      (line 138)
-* awk namespace:                         Default Namespace.   (line   6)
-* awk namespace, identifier name storage: Internal Name Management.
+* awk:                                   Preface.             (line   6)
+* awk, POSIX and:                        Preface.             (line  21)
+* awk, POSIX and <1>:                    Preface.             (line  21)
+* awk, gawk and:                         Preface.             (line  21)
+* awk, uses for:                         Preface.             (line  21)
+* awk, history of:                       History.             (line  17)
+* awk, new vs. old:                      Names.               (line   6)
+* awk, terms describing:                 This Manual.         (line   6)
+* awk, gawk and <1>:                     This Manual.         (line  14)
+* awk, function of:                      Getting Started.     (line   6)
+* awk, uses for <1>:                     Getting Started.     (line  12)
+* awk, uses for <2>:                     When.                (line   6)
+* awk, invoking:                         Command Line.        (line   6)
+* awk, profiling, enabling:              Options.             (line 271)
+* awk, implementations, limits:          Getline Notes.       (line  14)
+* awk, implementation issues, pipes:     Redirection.         (line 129)
+* awk, new vs. old, OFMT variable:       Strings And Numbers. (line  56)
+* awk, language, POSIX version:          Assignment Ops.      (line 138)
+* awk, regexp constants and:             Comparison Operators.
+                                                              (line 103)
+* awk, language, POSIX version <1>:      Next Statement.      (line  44)
+* awk, language, POSIX version <2>:      Definition Syntax.   (line  99)
+* awk, namespace:                        Default Namespace.   (line   6)
+* awk, namespace, identifier name storage: Internal Name Management.
                                                               (line   6)
-* awk namespace, use for indirect function calls: Internal Name Management.
+* awk, namespace, use for indirect function calls: Internal Name Management.
+                                                              (line   6)
+* awk, versions of:                      V7/SVR3.1.           (line   6)
+* awk, versions of, changes between V7 and SVR3.1: V7/SVR3.1. (line   6)
+* awk, versions of, changes between SVR3.1 and SVR4: SVR4.    (line   6)
+* awk, versions of, changes between SVR4 and POSIX awk: POSIX.
                                                               (line   6)
-* awk profiling, enabling:               Options.             (line 271)
+* awk, versions of <1>:                  BTL.                 (line   6)
+* awk, implementations:                  Other Versions.      (line   6)
+* awk, versions of <2>:                  Other Versions.      (line  13)
 * awk programs:                          Getting Started.     (line  12)
+* awk programs, running:                 Running gawk.        (line   6)
+* awk programs, running, from shell scripts: One-shot.        (line  22)
+* awk programs, running, without input files: Read Terminal.  (line  16)
+* awk programs, running <1>:             Long.                (line   6)
+* awk programs, lengthy:                 Long.                (line   6)
 * awk programs <1>:                      Executable Scripts.  (line   6)
+* awk programs, documenting:             Comments.            (line   6)
+* awk programs, one-line examples:       Very Simple.         (line  46)
 * awk programs <2>:                      Two Rules.           (line   6)
 * awk programs, complex:                 When.                (line  27)
-* awk programs, documenting:             Comments.            (line   6)
-* awk programs, documenting <1>:         Library Names.       (line   6)
-* awk programs, examples of:             Sample Programs.     (line   6)
-* awk programs, execution of:            Next Statement.      (line  16)
-* awk programs, internationalizing:      I18N Functions.      (line   6)
-* awk programs, internationalizing <1>:  Programmer i18n.     (line   6)
-* awk programs, lengthy:                 Long.                (line   6)
-* awk programs, lengthy, assertions:     Assert Function.     (line   6)
 * awk programs, location of:             Options.             (line  25)
+* awk programs, debugging, enabling:     Options.             (line 112)
 * awk programs, location of <1>:         Options.             (line 147)
 * awk programs, location of <2>:         Options.             (line 181)
-* awk programs, one-line examples:       Very Simple.         (line  46)
-* awk programs, profiling:               Profiling.           (line   6)
-* awk programs, running:                 Running gawk.        (line   6)
-* awk programs, running <1>:             Long.                (line   6)
-* awk programs, running, from shell scripts: One-shot.        (line  22)
-* awk programs, running, without input files: Read Terminal.  (line  16)
 * awk programs, shell variables in:      Using Shell Variables.
                                                               (line   6)
-* awk, function of:                      Getting Started.     (line   6)
-* awk, gawk and:                         Preface.             (line  21)
-* awk, gawk and <1>:                     This Manual.         (line  14)
-* awk, history of:                       History.             (line  17)
-* awk, implementation issues, pipes:     Redirection.         (line 129)
-* awk, implementations:                  Other Versions.      (line   6)
-* awk, implementations, limits:          Getline Notes.       (line  14)
-* awk, invoking:                         Command Line.        (line   6)
-* awk, new vs. old:                      Names.               (line   6)
-* awk, new vs. old, OFMT variable:       Strings And Numbers. (line  56)
-* awk, POSIX and:                        Preface.             (line  21)
-* awk, POSIX and, See Also POSIX awk:    Preface.             (line  21)
-* awk, regexp constants and:             Comparison Operators.
-                                                              (line 103)
-* awk, See Also gawk:                    Preface.             (line  34)
-* awk, terms describing:                 This Manual.         (line   6)
-* awk, uses for:                         Preface.             (line  21)
-* awk, uses for <1>:                     Getting Started.     (line  12)
-* awk, uses for <2>:                     When.                (line   6)
-* awk, versions of:                      V7/SVR3.1.           (line   6)
-* awk, versions of, changes between SVR3.1 and SVR4: SVR4.    (line   6)
-* awk, versions of, changes between SVR4 and POSIX awk: POSIX.
-                                                              (line   6)
-* awk, versions of, changes between V7 and SVR3.1: V7/SVR3.1. (line   6)
-* awk, versions of, See Also Brian Kernighan's awk: BTL.      (line   6)
-* awk, versions of, See Also Brian Kernighan's awk <1>: Other Versions.
-                                                              (line  13)
+* awk programs, execution of:            Next Statement.      (line  16)
+* awk programs, internationalizing:      I18N Functions.      (line   6)
+* awk programs, documenting <1>:         Library Names.       (line   6)
+* awk programs, lengthy, assertions:     Assert Function.     (line   6)
+* awk programs, examples of:             Sample Programs.     (line   6)
+* awk programs, profiling:               Profiling.           (line   6)
+* awk programs, internationalizing <1>:  Programmer i18n.     (line   6)
 * awka compiler for awk:                 Other Versions.      (line  64)
+* awk <1>:                               Preface.             (line  34)
 * AWKLIBPATH environment variable:       AWKLIBPATH Variable. (line   6)
 * AWKPATH environment variable:          AWKPATH Variable.    (line   6)
 * AWKPATH environment variable <1>:      PC Using.            (line  13)
@@ -34179,86 +34218,86 @@ Index
 * awkvars.out file:                      Options.             (line  98)
 * b debugger command (alias for break):  Breakpoint Control.  (line  11)
 * backslash (\):                         Comments.            (line  50)
-* backslash (\), as field separator:     Command Line Field Separator.
-                                                              (line  24)
+* backslash (\), in shell commands:      Quoting.             (line  48)
 * backslash (\), continuing lines and:   Statements/Lines.    (line  19)
-* backslash (\), continuing lines and, comments and: Statements/Lines.
-                                                              (line  75)
 * backslash (\), continuing lines and, in csh: Statements/Lines.
                                                               (line  43)
-* backslash (\), gsub()/gensub()/sub() functions and: Gory Details.
-                                                              (line   6)
-* backslash (\), in bracket expressions: Bracket Expressions. (line  25)
+* backslash (\), continuing lines and, comments and: Statements/Lines.
+                                                              (line  75)
 * backslash (\), in escape sequences:    Escape Sequences.    (line   6)
-* backslash (\), in escape sequences <1>: Escape Sequences.   (line 103)
-* backslash (\), in escape sequences, POSIX and: Escape Sequences.
-                                                              (line 108)
-* backslash (\), in regexp constants:    Computed Regexps.    (line  30)
-* backslash (\), in shell commands:      Quoting.             (line  48)
-* backslash (\), regexp operator:        Regexp Operator Details.
-                                                              (line  14)
-* backslash (\), \" escape sequence:     Escape Sequences.    (line  85)
-* backslash (\), \' operator (gawk):     GNU Regexp Operators.
-                                                              (line  59)
-* backslash (\), \/ escape sequence:     Escape Sequences.    (line  76)
-* backslash (\), \< operator (gawk):     GNU Regexp Operators.
-                                                              (line  33)
-* backslash (\), \> operator (gawk):     GNU Regexp Operators.
-                                                              (line  37)
 * backslash (\), \a escape sequence:     Escape Sequences.    (line  34)
 * backslash (\), \b escape sequence:     Escape Sequences.    (line  38)
-* backslash (\), \B operator (gawk):     GNU Regexp Operators.
-                                                              (line  46)
 * backslash (\), \f escape sequence:     Escape Sequences.    (line  41)
 * backslash (\), \n escape sequence:     Escape Sequences.    (line  44)
-* backslash (\), \NNN escape sequence:   Escape Sequences.    (line  56)
 * backslash (\), \r escape sequence:     Escape Sequences.    (line  47)
+* backslash (\), \t escape sequence:     Escape Sequences.    (line  50)
+* backslash (\), \v escape sequence:     Escape Sequences.    (line  53)
+* backslash (\), \NNN escape sequence:   Escape Sequences.    (line  56)
+* backslash (\), \x escape sequence:     Escape Sequences.    (line  61)
+* backslash (\), \/ escape sequence:     Escape Sequences.    (line  76)
+* backslash (\), \" escape sequence:     Escape Sequences.    (line  85)
+* backslash (\), in escape sequences <1>: Escape Sequences.   (line 103)
+* backslash (\), in escape sequences, POSIX and: Escape Sequences.
+                                                              (line 108)
+* backslash (\), regexp operator:        Regexp Operator Details.
+                                                              (line  14)
+* backslash (\), in bracket expressions: Bracket Expressions. (line  25)
+* backslash (\), in regexp constants:    Computed Regexps.    (line  30)
 * backslash (\), \s operator (gawk):     GNU Regexp Operators.
                                                               (line  13)
 * backslash (\), \S operator (gawk):     GNU Regexp Operators.
                                                               (line  17)
-* backslash (\), \t escape sequence:     Escape Sequences.    (line  50)
-* backslash (\), \v escape sequence:     Escape Sequences.    (line  53)
 * backslash (\), \w operator (gawk):     GNU Regexp Operators.
                                                               (line  22)
 * backslash (\), \W operator (gawk):     GNU Regexp Operators.
                                                               (line  28)
-* backslash (\), \x escape sequence:     Escape Sequences.    (line  61)
+* backslash (\), \< operator (gawk):     GNU Regexp Operators.
+                                                              (line  33)
+* backslash (\), \> operator (gawk):     GNU Regexp Operators.
+                                                              (line  37)
 * backslash (\), \y operator (gawk):     GNU Regexp Operators.
                                                               (line  41)
+* backslash (\), \B operator (gawk):     GNU Regexp Operators.
+                                                              (line  46)
 * backslash (\), \` operator (gawk):     GNU Regexp Operators.
                                                               (line  57)
+* backslash (\), \' operator (gawk):     GNU Regexp Operators.
+                                                              (line  59)
+* backslash (\), as field separator:     Command Line Field Separator.
+                                                              (line  24)
+* backslash (\), gsub()/gensub()/sub() functions and: Gory Details.
+                                                              (line   6)
 * backtrace debugger command:            Execution Stack.     (line  13)
 * Beebe, Nelson H.F.:                    Acknowledgments.     (line  60)
 * Beebe, Nelson H.F. <1>:                Numeric Functions.   (line  33)
 * Beebe, Nelson H.F. <2>:                Other Versions.      (line  78)
 * BEGIN pattern:                         Field Separators.    (line  44)
-* BEGIN pattern <1>:                     BEGIN/END.           (line   6)
-* BEGIN pattern <2>:                     Using BEGIN/END.     (line   6)
-* BEGIN pattern, assert() user-defined function and: Assert Function.
-                                                              (line  83)
-* BEGIN pattern, Boolean patterns and:   Expression Patterns. (line  70)
-* BEGIN pattern, execution order not affected by @namespace: Changing The 
Namespace.
-                                                              (line  37)
-* BEGIN pattern, exit statement and:     Exit Statement.      (line  12)
 * BEGIN pattern, getline and:            Getline Notes.       (line  19)
 * BEGIN pattern, headings, adding:       Print Examples.      (line  42)
-* BEGIN pattern, next/nextfile statements and: I/O And BEGIN/END.
-                                                              (line  36)
-* BEGIN pattern, next/nextfile statements and <1>: Next Statement.
-                                                              (line  44)
 * BEGIN pattern, OFS/ORS variables, assigning values to: Output Separators.
                                                               (line  20)
+* BEGIN pattern, Boolean patterns and:   Expression Patterns. (line  70)
+* BEGIN pattern <1>:                     BEGIN/END.           (line   6)
+* BEGIN pattern <2>:                     Using BEGIN/END.     (line   6)
 * BEGIN pattern, operators and:          Using BEGIN/END.     (line  17)
 * BEGIN pattern, print statement and:    I/O And BEGIN/END.   (line  15)
-* BEGIN pattern, profiling and:          Profiling.           (line  62)
+* BEGIN pattern, next/nextfile statements and: I/O And BEGIN/END.
+                                                              (line  36)
+* BEGIN pattern, next/nextfile statements and <1>: Next Statement.
+                                                              (line  44)
+* BEGIN pattern, exit statement and:     Exit Statement.      (line  12)
+* BEGIN pattern, assert() user-defined function and: Assert Function.
+                                                              (line  83)
 * BEGIN pattern, pwcat program:          Passwd Functions.    (line 143)
 * BEGIN pattern, running awk programs and: Cut Program.       (line  63)
+* BEGIN pattern, profiling and:          Profiling.           (line  62)
 * BEGIN pattern, TEXTDOMAIN variable and: Programmer i18n.    (line  60)
-* BEGINFILE pattern:                     BEGINFILE/ENDFILE.   (line   6)
+* BEGIN pattern, @namespace directive and: Changing The Namespace.
+                                                              (line  37)
 * BEGINFILE pattern, Boolean patterns and: Expression Patterns.
                                                               (line  70)
-* BEGINFILE pattern, execution order not affected by @namespace: Changing The 
Namespace.
+* BEGINFILE pattern:                     BEGINFILE/ENDFILE.   (line   6)
+* BEGINFILE pattern, @namespace directive and: Changing The Namespace.
                                                               (line  37)
 * beginfile() user-defined function:     Filetrans Function.  (line  62)
 * Bentley, Jon:                          Glossary.            (line 204)
@@ -34276,48 +34315,51 @@ Index
 * BINMODE variable <1>:                  PC Using.            (line  20)
 * bit-manipulation functions:            Bitwise Functions.   (line   6)
 * bits2str() user-defined function:      Bitwise Functions.   (line  69)
-* bitwise AND:                           Bitwise Functions.   (line  40)
-* bitwise complement:                    Bitwise Functions.   (line  25)
-* bitwise complement <1>:                Bitwise Functions.   (line  44)
-* bitwise OR:                            Bitwise Functions.   (line  50)
-* bitwise XOR:                           Bitwise Functions.   (line  57)
 * bitwise, operations:                   Bitwise Functions.   (line   6)
+* bitwise, complement:                   Bitwise Functions.   (line  25)
 * bitwise, shift:                        Bitwise Functions.   (line  32)
+* bitwise, AND:                          Bitwise Functions.   (line  40)
+* bitwise, complement <1>:               Bitwise Functions.   (line  44)
+* bitwise, OR:                           Bitwise Functions.   (line  50)
+* bitwise, XOR:                          Bitwise Functions.   (line  57)
 * body, in actions:                      Statements.          (line  10)
 * body, in loops:                        While Statement.     (line  14)
 * Boolean expressions:                   Boolean Ops.         (line   6)
 * Boolean expressions, as patterns:      Expression Patterns. (line  39)
-* Boolean operators, See Boolean expressions: Boolean Ops.    (line   6)
 * Bourne shell, quoting rules for:       Quoting.             (line  18)
-* braces ({}):                           Profiling.           (line 142)
+* braces ({}), regexp operator:          Regexp Operator Details.
+                                                              (line 118)
 * braces ({}), actions and:              Action Overview.     (line  19)
 * braces ({}), statements, grouping:     Statements.          (line  10)
+* braces ({}):                           Profiling.           (line 142)
 * bracket expressions:                   Regexp Operator Details.
                                                               (line  52)
+* bracket expressions, complemented:     Regexp Operator Details.
+                                                              (line  60)
 * bracket expressions <1>:               Bracket Expressions. (line   6)
+* bracket expressions, range expressions: Bracket Expressions.
+                                                              (line   6)
+* bracket expressions, character lists:  Bracket Expressions. (line   6)
 * bracket expressions, character classes: Bracket Expressions.
                                                               (line  40)
 * bracket expressions, collating elements: Bracket Expressions.
                                                               (line  90)
+* bracket expressions, non-ASCII:        Bracket Expressions. (line  90)
 * bracket expressions, collating symbols: Bracket Expressions.
                                                               (line  97)
-* bracket expressions, complemented:     Regexp Operator Details.
-                                                              (line  60)
 * bracket expressions, equivalence classes: Bracket Expressions.
                                                               (line 103)
-* bracket expressions, non-ASCII:        Bracket Expressions. (line  90)
-* bracket expressions, range expressions: Bracket Expressions.
-                                                              (line   6)
 * break debugger command:                Breakpoint Control.  (line  11)
 * break statement:                       Break Statement.     (line   6)
-* breakpoint (debugger):                 Debugging Terms.     (line  33)
-* breakpoint at location, how to delete: Breakpoint Control.  (line  36)
-* breakpoint commands:                   Debugger Execution Control.
-                                                              (line  10)
-* breakpoint condition:                  Breakpoint Control.  (line  54)
+* breakpoint:                            Debugging Terms.     (line  33)
+* breakpoint, setting:                   Breakpoint Control.  (line  11)
+* breakpoint, at location, how to delete: Breakpoint Control. (line  36)
+* breakpoint, condition:                 Breakpoint Control.  (line  54)
 * breakpoint, delete by number:          Breakpoint Control.  (line  64)
 * breakpoint, how to disable or enable:  Breakpoint Control.  (line  69)
-* breakpoint, setting:                   Breakpoint Control.  (line  11)
+* breakpoint, commands to execute at:    Debugger Execution Control.
+                                                              (line  10)
+* breakpoint, show all in debugger:      Debugger Info.       (line  21)
 * Brennan, Michael:                      Foreword3.           (line  84)
 * Brennan, Michael <1>:                  Foreword4.           (line  33)
 * Brennan, Michael <2>:                  Acknowledgments.     (line  79)
@@ -34352,56 +34394,64 @@ Index
 * Buening, Andreas:                      Acknowledgments.     (line  60)
 * Buening, Andreas <1>:                  Contributors.        (line  95)
 * Buening, Andreas <2>:                  Maintainers.         (line  14)
+* buffering, interactive vs. noninteractive: I/O Functions.   (line  76)
 * buffering, input/output:               I/O Functions.       (line 168)
 * buffering, input/output <1>:           Two-way I/O.         (line  53)
-* buffering, interactive vs. noninteractive: I/O Functions.   (line  76)
-* buffers, flushing:                     I/O Functions.       (line  32)
-* buffers, flushing <1>:                 I/O Functions.       (line 168)
 * buffers, operators for:                GNU Regexp Operators.
                                                               (line  51)
+* buffers, flushing:                     I/O Functions.       (line  32)
+* buffers, flushing <1>:                 I/O Functions.       (line 168)
 * bug reports, email address, address@hidden: Bug address.  (line  31)
 * address@hidden bug reporting address: Bug address.        (line  31)
 * built-in functions:                    Functions.           (line   6)
 * built-in functions, evaluation order:  Calling Built-in.    (line  30)
 * BusyBox Awk:                           Other Versions.      (line  88)
-* c.e., See common extensions:           Conventions.         (line  51)
+* C library functions, assert():         Assert Function.     (line   6)
+* C library functions, getopt():         Getopt Function.     (line  15)
+* C library functions, getpwent():       Passwd Functions.    (line  16)
+* C library functions, getpwnam():       Passwd Functions.    (line 175)
+* C library functions, getpwuid():       Passwd Functions.    (line 186)
+* C library functions, getpwent() <1>:   Passwd Functions.    (line 196)
+* C library functions, endpwent():       Passwd Functions.    (line 208)
+* C library functions, getgrent():       Group Functions.     (line   6)
+* C library functions, getgrnam():       Group Functions.     (line 173)
+* C library functions, getgrgid():       Group Functions.     (line 184)
+* C library functions, getgruser():      Group Functions.     (line 193)
+* C library functions, getgrent() <1>:   Group Functions.     (line 202)
+* C library functions, endgrent():       Group Functions.     (line 213)
+* C library functions, getaddrinfo():    TCP/IP Networking.   (line  39)
+* C library functions, textdomain():     Explaining gettext.  (line  28)
+* C library functions, bindtextdomain(): Explaining gettext.  (line  50)
+* C library functions, gettext():        Explaining gettext.  (line  63)
 * call by reference:                     Pass By Value/Reference.
                                                               (line  44)
 * call by value:                         Pass By Value/Reference.
                                                               (line  15)
-* call stack (debugger):                 Debugging Terms.     (line  10)
+* call stack, explanation of:            Debugging Terms.     (line  10)
 * call stack, display in debugger:       Execution Stack.     (line  13)
-* caret (^), in bracket expressions:     Bracket Expressions. (line  25)
 * caret (^), regexp operator:            Regexp Operator Details.
                                                               (line  18)
+* caret (^), in bracket expressions:     Bracket Expressions. (line  25)
 * caret (^), regexp operator <1>:        GNU Regexp Operators.
                                                               (line  62)
-* caret (^), ^ operator:                 Precedence.          (line  48)
 * caret (^), ^= operator:                Assignment Ops.      (line 129)
+* caret (^), ^ operator:                 Precedence.          (line  48)
 * caret (^), ^= operator <1>:            Precedence.          (line  94)
 * case keyword:                          Switch Statement.    (line   6)
+* case sensitivity, regexps and:         Case-sensitivity.    (line   6)
+* case sensitivity, gawk:                Case-sensitivity.    (line  26)
+* case sensitivity, string comparisons and: User-modified.    (line  79)
+* case sensitivity, regexps and <1>:     User-modified.       (line  79)
 * case sensitivity, array indices and:   Array Intro.         (line 100)
 * case sensitivity, converting case:     String Functions.    (line 528)
 * case sensitivity, example programs:    Library Functions.   (line  53)
-* case sensitivity, gawk:                Case-sensitivity.    (line  26)
-* case sensitivity, regexps and:         Case-sensitivity.    (line   6)
-* case sensitivity, regexps and <1>:     User-modified.       (line  79)
-* case sensitivity, string comparisons and: User-modified.    (line  79)
 * CGI, awk scripts for:                  Options.             (line 147)
-* character classes, See bracket expressions: Regexp Operator Details.
-                                                              (line  52)
-* character lists in regular expressions: Bracket Expressions.
-                                                              (line   6)
-* character lists, See bracket expressions: Regexp Operator Details.
-                                                              (line  52)
 * character sets (machine character encodings): Ordinal Functions.
                                                               (line  45)
 * character sets (machine character encodings) <1>: Glossary. (line 194)
-* character sets, See Also bracket expressions: Regexp Operator Details.
-                                                              (line  52)
+* characters, values of as numbers:      Ordinal Functions.   (line   6)
 * characters, counting:                  Wc Program.          (line   6)
 * characters, transliterating:           Translate Program.   (line   6)
-* characters, values of as numbers:      Ordinal Functions.   (line   6)
 * Chassell, Robert J.:                   Acknowledgments.     (line  33)
 * chdir() extension function:            Extension Sample File Functions.
                                                               (line  12)
@@ -34432,68 +34482,70 @@ Index
 * Colombo, Antonio:                      Acknowledgments.     (line  60)
 * Colombo, Antonio <1>:                  Contributors.        (line 143)
 * colon (:), ?: operator:                Precedence.          (line  91)
+* colon (:), :: namespace separator:     Qualified Names.     (line   6)
 * columns, aligning:                     Print Examples.      (line  69)
 * columns, cutting:                      Cut Program.         (line   6)
 * comma (,), in range patterns:          Ranges.              (line   6)
 * command completion, in debugger:       Readline Support.    (line   6)
-* command line, arguments:               Other Arguments.     (line   6)
-* command line, arguments <1>:           Auto-set.            (line  15)
-* command line, arguments <2>:           Auto-set.            (line 154)
-* command line, arguments <3>:           ARGC and ARGV.       (line   6)
-* command line, directories on:          Command-line directories.
-                                                              (line   6)
 * command line, formats:                 Running gawk.        (line  12)
-* command line, FS on, setting:          Command Line Field Separator.
-                                                              (line   6)
-* command line, invoking awk from:       Command Line.        (line   6)
 * command line, option -f:               Long.                (line  12)
+* command line, invoking awk from:       Command Line.        (line   6)
 * command line, options:                 Options.             (line   6)
 * command line, options, end of:         Options.             (line  59)
+* command line, arguments:               Other Arguments.     (line   6)
+* command line, FS on, setting:          Command Line Field Separator.
+                                                              (line   6)
+* command line, directories on:          Command-line directories.
+                                                              (line   6)
 * command line, variables, assigning on: Assignment Options.  (line   6)
-* command-line options, processing:      Getopt Function.     (line   6)
-* command-line options, string extraction: String Extraction. (line   6)
+* command line, arguments <1>:           Auto-set.            (line  15)
+* command line, arguments <2>:           Auto-set.            (line 154)
+* command line, arguments <3>:           ARGC and ARGV.       (line   6)
+* command line, options, processing:     Getopt Function.     (line   6)
+* command line, options, string extraction: String Extraction.
+                                                              (line   6)
 * commands debugger command:             Debugger Execution Control.
                                                               (line  10)
 * commands to execute at breakpoint:     Debugger Execution Control.
                                                               (line  10)
 * commenting:                            Comments.            (line   6)
 * commenting, backslash continuation and: Statements/Lines.   (line  75)
-* common extensions, ** operator:        Arithmetic Ops.      (line  30)
-* common extensions, **= operator:       Assignment Ops.      (line 138)
-* common extensions, /dev/stderr special file: Special FD.    (line  48)
+* common extensions, \x escape sequence: Escape Sequences.    (line  61)
+* common extensions, RS as a regexp:     gawk split records.  (line   6)
+* common extensions, single character fields: Single Character Fields.
+                                                              (line   6)
 * common extensions, /dev/stdin special file: Special FD.     (line  48)
 * common extensions, /dev/stdout special file: Special FD.    (line  48)
-* common extensions, BINMODE variable:   PC Using.            (line  20)
+* common extensions, /dev/stderr special file: Special FD.    (line  48)
+* common extensions, ** operator:        Arithmetic Ops.      (line  30)
+* common extensions, **= operator:       Assignment Ops.      (line 138)
 * common extensions, delete to delete entire arrays: Delete.  (line  39)
-* common extensions, func keyword:       Definition Syntax.   (line  99)
 * common extensions, length() applied to an array: String Functions.
                                                               (line 201)
-* common extensions, RS as a regexp:     gawk split records.  (line   6)
-* common extensions, single character fields: Single Character Fields.
-                                                              (line   6)
-* common extensions, \x escape sequence: Escape Sequences.    (line  61)
+* common extensions, func keyword:       Definition Syntax.   (line  99)
+* common extensions, BINMODE variable:   PC Using.            (line  20)
 * comp.lang.awk newsgroup:               Usenet.              (line  11)
 * comparison expressions:                Typing and Comparison.
                                                               (line   9)
-* comparison expressions, as patterns:   Expression Patterns. (line  14)
 * comparison expressions, string vs. regexp: Comparison Operators.
                                                               (line  79)
-* compatibility mode (gawk), extensions: POSIX/GNU.           (line   6)
+* comparison expressions, as patterns:   Expression Patterns. (line  14)
+* compatibility mode (gawk), specifying: Options.             (line  86)
 * compatibility mode (gawk), file names: Special Caveats.     (line   9)
-* compatibility mode (gawk), hexadecimal numbers: Nondecimal-numbers.
-                                                              (line  59)
 * compatibility mode (gawk), octal numbers: Nondecimal-numbers.
                                                               (line  59)
-* compatibility mode (gawk), specifying: Options.             (line  86)
+* compatibility mode (gawk), hexadecimal numbers: Nondecimal-numbers.
+                                                              (line  59)
+* compatibility mode (gawk), extensions: POSIX/GNU.           (line   6)
 * compiled programs:                     Basic High Level.    (line  13)
 * compiled programs <1>:                 Glossary.            (line 216)
-* compiling gawk for Cygwin:             Cygwin.              (line   6)
-* compiling gawk for MS-Windows:         PC Compiling.        (line  11)
-* compiling gawk for VMS:                VMS Compilation.     (line   6)
+* compiling gawk, for MS-Windows:        PC Compiling.        (line  11)
+* compiling gawk, for Cygwin:            Cygwin.              (line   6)
+* compiling gawk, for VMS:               VMS Compilation.     (line   6)
 * compl:                                 Bitwise Functions.   (line  44)
 * complement, bitwise:                   Bitwise Functions.   (line  25)
 * component name:                        Qualified Names.     (line   6)
-* component names, naming rules:         Naming Rules.        (line   6)
+* component name, naming rules:          Naming Rules.        (line   6)
 * compound statements, control statements and: Statements.    (line  10)
 * concatenating:                         Concatenation.       (line   9)
 * condition debugger command:            Breakpoint Control.  (line  54)
@@ -34510,10 +34562,11 @@ Index
                                                               (line  46)
 * configuration options, gawk:           Additional Configuration Options.
                                                               (line   6)
-* constant regexps:                      Regexp Usage.        (line  57)
-* constants, nondecimal:                 Nondecimal Data.     (line   6)
-* constants, numeric:                    Scalar Constants.    (line   6)
+* constants, regexp:                     Regexp Usage.        (line  57)
 * constants, types of:                   Constants.           (line   6)
+* constants, numeric:                    Scalar Constants.    (line   6)
+* constants, string:                     Scalar Constants.    (line  15)
+* constants, nondecimal:                 Nondecimal Data.     (line   6)
 * continue debugger command:             Debugger Execution Control.
                                                               (line  33)
 * continue program, in debugger:         Debugger Execution Control.
@@ -34522,37 +34575,38 @@ Index
 * control statements:                    Statements.          (line   6)
 * controlling array scanning order:      Controlling Scanning.
                                                               (line  14)
-* convert string to lower case:          String Functions.    (line 529)
-* convert string to number:              String Functions.    (line 396)
-* convert string to upper case:          String Functions.    (line 535)
-* converting integer array subscripts:   Numeric Array Subscripts.
+* converting, string to numbers:         Strings And Numbers. (line   6)
+* converting, numbers to strings:        Strings And Numbers. (line   6)
+* converting, integer array subscripts to strings: Numeric Array Subscripts.
                                                               (line  31)
+* converting, string to numbers <1>:     String Functions.    (line 396)
+* converting, string to lower case:      String Functions.    (line 529)
+* converting, string to upper case:      String Functions.    (line 535)
 * converting, dates to timestamps:       Time Functions.      (line  78)
-* converting, numbers to strings:        Strings And Numbers. (line   6)
+* converting, string to numbers <2>:     Bitwise Functions.   (line 109)
 * converting, numbers to strings <1>:    Bitwise Functions.   (line 109)
-* converting, strings to numbers:        Strings And Numbers. (line   6)
-* converting, strings to numbers <1>:    Bitwise Functions.   (line 109)
 * CONVFMT variable:                      Strings And Numbers. (line  29)
 * CONVFMT variable <1>:                  User-modified.       (line  30)
 * CONVFMT variable, array subscripts and: Numeric Array Subscripts.
                                                               (line   6)
 * cookie:                                Glossary.            (line 255)
+* coprocesses, getline from:             Getline/Coprocess.   (line   6)
 * coprocesses:                           Redirection.         (line  96)
-* coprocesses <1>:                       Two-way I/O.         (line  27)
 * coprocesses, closing:                  Close Files And Pipes.
                                                               (line   6)
-* coprocesses, getline from:             Getline/Coprocess.   (line   6)
+* coprocesses <1>:                       Two-way I/O.         (line  27)
 * cos:                                   Numeric Functions.   (line  16)
 * cosine:                                Numeric Functions.   (line  16)
-* counting:                              Wc Program.          (line   6)
+* counting words, lines, and characters: Wc Program.          (line   6)
 * csh utility:                           Statements/Lines.    (line  43)
-* csh utility, POSIXLY_CORRECT environment variable: Options. (line 388)
+* csh utility, POSIXLY_CORRECT environment variable: Options. (line 392)
 * csh utility, |& operator, comparison with: Two-way I/O.     (line  27)
 * ctime() user-defined function:         Function Example.    (line  74)
 * Curreli, Marco:                        Contributors.        (line 147)
 * currency symbols, localization:        Explaining gettext.  (line 104)
 * current namespace, pushing and popping: Changing The Namespace.
                                                               (line  29)
+* current source file, show in debugger: Debugger Info.       (line  37)
 * current system time:                   Time Functions.      (line  68)
 * custom.h file:                         Configuration Philosophy.
                                                               (line  30)
@@ -34563,62 +34617,61 @@ Index
 * cut utility <1>:                       Cut Program.         (line   6)
 * cut.awk program:                       Cut Program.         (line  45)
 * d debugger command (alias for delete): Breakpoint Control.  (line  64)
-* d.c., See dark corner:                 Conventions.         (line  42)
 * dark corner:                           Conventions.         (line  42)
-* dark corner <1>:                       Glossary.            (line 266)
-* dark corner, "0" is actually true:     Truth Values.        (line  24)
-* dark corner, /= operator vs. /=.../ regexp constant: Assignment Ops.
-                                                              (line 149)
 * dark corner, ARGV variable, value of:  Executable Scripts.  (line  59)
-* dark corner, array subscripts:         Uninitialized Subscripts.
-                                                              (line  43)
-* dark corner, break statement:          Break Statement.     (line  51)
-* dark corner, close() function:         Close Files And Pipes.
-                                                              (line 132)
-* dark corner, command-line arguments:   Assignment Options.  (line  43)
-* dark corner, continue statement:       Continue Statement.  (line  44)
-* dark corner, CONVFMT variable:         Strings And Numbers. (line  39)
+* dark corner, invoking awk:             Command Line.        (line  16)
 * dark corner, empty programs:           Command Line.        (line  20)
 * dark corner, escape sequences:         Other Arguments.     (line  44)
 * dark corner, escape sequences, for metacharacters: Escape Sequences.
                                                               (line 144)
-* dark corner, exit statement:           Exit Statement.      (line  30)
+* dark corner, input files:              awk split records.   (line 117)
+* dark corner, strings, storing:         gawk split records.  (line  82)
+* dark corner, NF variable, decrementing: Changing Fields.    (line 107)
+* dark corner, ^, in FS:                 Regexp Field Splitting.
+                                                              (line  59)
+* dark corner, FS as null string:        Single Character Fields.
+                                                              (line  20)
 * dark corner, field separators:         Full Line Fields.    (line  22)
+* dark corner, multiline records:        Multiple Line.       (line  35)
 * dark corner, FILENAME variable:        Getline Notes.       (line  19)
-* dark corner, FILENAME variable <1>:    Auto-set.            (line 108)
-* dark corner, FNR/NR variables:         Auto-set.            (line 409)
+* dark corner, OFMT variable:            OFMT.                (line  27)
 * dark corner, format-control characters: Control Letters.    (line  33)
 * dark corner, format-control characters <1>: Control Letters.
                                                               (line 108)
-* dark corner, FS as null string:        Single Character Fields.
-                                                              (line  20)
-* dark corner, input files:              awk split records.   (line 117)
-* dark corner, invoking awk:             Command Line.        (line  16)
-* dark corner, length() function:        String Functions.    (line 187)
-* dark corner, locale's decimal point character: Locale influences conversions.
-                                                              (line  17)
-* dark corner, multiline records:        Multiple Line.       (line  35)
-* dark corner, NF variable, decrementing: Changing Fields.    (line 107)
-* dark corner, OFMT variable:            OFMT.                (line  27)
-* dark corner, range patterns, line continuation and: Ranges. (line  64)
-* dark corner, regexp as second argument to index(): String Functions.
-                                                              (line 165)
+* dark corner, close() function:         Close Files And Pipes.
+                                                              (line 132)
+* dark corner, string continuation:      Scalar Constants.    (line  53)
 * dark corner, regexp constants:         Standard Regexp Constants.
                                                               (line   6)
+* dark corner, regexp constants, as arguments to user-defined functions: 
Standard Regexp Constants.
+                                                              (line  43)
+* dark corner, command-line arguments:   Assignment Options.  (line  43)
+* dark corner, CONVFMT variable:         Strings And Numbers. (line  39)
+* dark corner, locale's decimal point character: Locale influences conversions.
+                                                              (line  17)
 * dark corner, regexp constants, /= operator and: Assignment Ops.
                                                               (line 149)
-* dark corner, regexp constants, as arguments to user-defined functions: 
Standard Regexp Constants.
+* dark corner, /= operator vs.  /=.../ regexp constant: Assignment Ops.
+                                                              (line 149)
+* dark corner, "0" is actually true:     Truth Values.        (line  24)
+* dark corner, range patterns, line continuation and: Ranges. (line  64)
+* dark corner, break statement:          Break Statement.     (line  51)
+* dark corner, continue statement:       Continue Statement.  (line  44)
+* dark corner, exit statement:           Exit Statement.      (line  30)
+* dark corner, value of ARGV[0]:         Auto-set.            (line  39)
+* dark corner, FILENAME variable <1>:    Auto-set.            (line 108)
+* dark corner, FNR/NR variables:         Auto-set.            (line 409)
+* dark corner, array subscripts:         Uninitialized Subscripts.
                                                               (line  43)
+* dark corner, regexp as second argument to index(): String Functions.
+                                                              (line 165)
+* dark corner, length() function:        String Functions.    (line 187)
 * dark corner, split() function:         String Functions.    (line 366)
-* dark corner, string continuation:      Scalar Constants.    (line  53)
-* dark corner, strings, storing:         gawk split records.  (line  82)
-* dark corner, value of ARGV[0]:         Auto-set.            (line  39)
-* dark corner, ^, in FS:                 Regexp Field Splitting.
-                                                              (line  59)
+* dark corner <1>:                       Glossary.            (line 266)
 * data, fixed-width:                     Constant Size.       (line   6)
 * data-driven languages:                 Basic High Level.    (line  74)
-* database, group, reading:              Group Functions.     (line   6)
 * database, users, reading:              Passwd Functions.    (line   6)
+* database, group, reading:              Group Functions.     (line   6)
 * date utility, GNU:                     Time Functions.      (line  17)
 * date utility, POSIX:                   Time Functions.      (line 255)
 * dates, converting to timestamps:       Time Functions.      (line  78)
@@ -34636,141 +34689,141 @@ Index
 * dcngettext() function (gawk), portability and: I18N Portability.
                                                               (line  33)
 * deadlocks:                             Two-way I/O.         (line  53)
-* debugger capabilities:                 Debugging Concepts.  (line  16)
-* debugger commands, b (break):          Breakpoint Control.  (line  11)
-* debugger commands, backtrace:          Execution Stack.     (line  13)
-* debugger commands, break:              Breakpoint Control.  (line  11)
-* debugger commands, bt (backtrace):     Execution Stack.     (line  13)
-* debugger commands, c (continue):       Debugger Execution Control.
-                                                              (line  33)
-* debugger commands, clear:              Breakpoint Control.  (line  36)
-* debugger commands, commands:           Debugger Execution Control.
+* debugger, capabilities:                Debugging Concepts.  (line  16)
+* debugger, concepts:                    Debugging Terms.     (line   6)
+* debugger, how to start:                Debugger Invocation. (line   6)
+* debugger, prompt:                      Debugger Invocation. (line  23)
+* debugger, setting a breakpoint:        Finding The Bug.     (line  32)
+* debugger, commands, breakpoint:        Finding The Bug.     (line  32)
+* debugger, commands, break:             Finding The Bug.     (line  32)
+* debugger, commands, b (break):         Finding The Bug.     (line  32)
+* debugger, running the program:         Finding The Bug.     (line  39)
+* debugger, commands, run:               Finding The Bug.     (line  39)
+* debugger, stack frames, showing:       Finding The Bug.     (line  52)
+* debugger, commands, bt (backtrace):    Finding The Bug.     (line  52)
+* debugger, commands, backtrace:         Finding The Bug.     (line  52)
+* debugger, commands, print:             Finding The Bug.     (line  68)
+* debugger, commands, p (print):         Finding The Bug.     (line  68)
+* debugger, commands, n (next):          Finding The Bug.     (line 105)
+* debugger, commands, next:              Finding The Bug.     (line 105)
+* debugger, printing single array elements: Finding The Bug.  (line 140)
+* debugger, printing all array elements: Finding The Bug.     (line 154)
+* debugger, repeating commands:          List of Debugger Commands.
+                                                              (line  21)
+* debugger, commands, b (break) <1>:     Breakpoint Control.  (line  11)
+* debugger, commands, break <1>:         Breakpoint Control.  (line  11)
+* debugger, commands, clear:             Breakpoint Control.  (line  36)
+* debugger, commands, condition:         Breakpoint Control.  (line  54)
+* debugger, commands, d (delete):        Breakpoint Control.  (line  64)
+* debugger, commands, delete:            Breakpoint Control.  (line  64)
+* debugger, commands, disable:           Breakpoint Control.  (line  69)
+* debugger, commands, e (enable):        Breakpoint Control.  (line  73)
+* debugger, commands, enable:            Breakpoint Control.  (line  73)
+* debugger, commands, ignore:            Breakpoint Control.  (line  87)
+* debugger, commands, t (tbreak):        Breakpoint Control.  (line  90)
+* debugger, commands, tbreak:            Breakpoint Control.  (line  90)
+* debugger, commands, commands:          Debugger Execution Control.
                                                               (line  10)
-* debugger commands, condition:          Breakpoint Control.  (line  54)
-* debugger commands, continue:           Debugger Execution Control.
-                                                              (line  33)
-* debugger commands, d (delete):         Breakpoint Control.  (line  64)
-* debugger commands, delete:             Breakpoint Control.  (line  64)
-* debugger commands, disable:            Breakpoint Control.  (line  69)
-* debugger commands, display:            Viewing And Changing Data.
-                                                              (line   8)
-* debugger commands, down:               Execution Stack.     (line  23)
-* debugger commands, dump:               Miscellaneous Debugger Commands.
-                                                              (line   9)
-* debugger commands, e (enable):         Breakpoint Control.  (line  73)
-* debugger commands, enable:             Breakpoint Control.  (line  73)
-* debugger commands, end:                Debugger Execution Control.
+* debugger, commands, silent:            Debugger Execution Control.
                                                               (line  10)
-* debugger commands, eval:               Viewing And Changing Data.
-                                                              (line  23)
-* debugger commands, f (frame):          Execution Stack.     (line  27)
-* debugger commands, finish:             Debugger Execution Control.
+* debugger, commands, end:               Debugger Execution Control.
+                                                              (line  10)
+* debugger, commands, c (continue):      Debugger Execution Control.
+                                                              (line  33)
+* debugger, commands, continue:          Debugger Execution Control.
+                                                              (line  33)
+* debugger, commands, finish:            Debugger Execution Control.
                                                               (line  39)
-* debugger commands, frame:              Execution Stack.     (line  27)
-* debugger commands, h (help):           Miscellaneous Debugger Commands.
-                                                              (line  67)
-* debugger commands, help:               Miscellaneous Debugger Commands.
-                                                              (line  67)
-* debugger commands, i (info):           Debugger Info.       (line  13)
-* debugger commands, ignore:             Breakpoint Control.  (line  87)
-* debugger commands, info:               Debugger Info.       (line  13)
-* debugger commands, l (list):           Miscellaneous Debugger Commands.
-                                                              (line  73)
-* debugger commands, list:               Miscellaneous Debugger Commands.
-                                                              (line  73)
-* debugger commands, n (next):           Debugger Execution Control.
+* debugger, commands, n (next) <1>:      Debugger Execution Control.
                                                               (line  43)
-* debugger commands, next:               Debugger Execution Control.
+* debugger, commands, next <1>:          Debugger Execution Control.
                                                               (line  43)
-* debugger commands, nexti:              Debugger Execution Control.
+* debugger, commands, ni (nexti):        Debugger Execution Control.
                                                               (line  49)
-* debugger commands, ni (nexti):         Debugger Execution Control.
+* debugger, commands, nexti:             Debugger Execution Control.
                                                               (line  49)
-* debugger commands, o (option):         Debugger Info.       (line  57)
-* debugger commands, option:             Debugger Info.       (line  57)
-* debugger commands, p (print):          Viewing And Changing Data.
-                                                              (line  39)
-* debugger commands, print:              Viewing And Changing Data.
-                                                              (line  39)
-* debugger commands, printf:             Viewing And Changing Data.
-                                                              (line  57)
-* debugger commands, q (quit):           Miscellaneous Debugger Commands.
-                                                              (line 100)
-* debugger commands, quit:               Miscellaneous Debugger Commands.
-                                                              (line 100)
-* debugger commands, r (run):            Debugger Execution Control.
-                                                              (line  62)
-* debugger commands, return:             Debugger Execution Control.
+* debugger, commands, return:            Debugger Execution Control.
                                                               (line  54)
-* debugger commands, run:                Debugger Execution Control.
+* debugger, commands, r (run):           Debugger Execution Control.
                                                               (line  62)
-* debugger commands, s (step):           Debugger Execution Control.
-                                                              (line  68)
-* debugger commands, set:                Viewing And Changing Data.
+* debugger, commands, run <1>:           Debugger Execution Control.
                                                               (line  62)
-* debugger commands, si (stepi):         Debugger Execution Control.
-                                                              (line  75)
-* debugger commands, silent:             Debugger Execution Control.
-                                                              (line  10)
-* debugger commands, step:               Debugger Execution Control.
+* debugger, commands, s (step):          Debugger Execution Control.
+                                                              (line  68)
+* debugger, commands, step:              Debugger Execution Control.
                                                               (line  68)
-* debugger commands, stepi:              Debugger Execution Control.
+* debugger, commands, si (stepi):        Debugger Execution Control.
                                                               (line  75)
-* debugger commands, t (tbreak):         Breakpoint Control.  (line  90)
-* debugger commands, tbreak:             Breakpoint Control.  (line  90)
-* debugger commands, trace:              Miscellaneous Debugger Commands.
-                                                              (line 108)
-* debugger commands, u (until):          Debugger Execution Control.
+* debugger, commands, stepi:             Debugger Execution Control.
+                                                              (line  75)
+* debugger, commands, u (until):         Debugger Execution Control.
                                                               (line  82)
-* debugger commands, undisplay:          Viewing And Changing Data.
-                                                              (line  83)
-* debugger commands, until:              Debugger Execution Control.
+* debugger, commands, until:             Debugger Execution Control.
                                                               (line  82)
-* debugger commands, unwatch:            Viewing And Changing Data.
-                                                              (line  87)
-* debugger commands, up:                 Execution Stack.     (line  36)
-* debugger commands, w (watch):          Viewing And Changing Data.
+* debugger, commands, display:           Viewing And Changing Data.
+                                                              (line   8)
+* debugger, commands, eval:              Viewing And Changing Data.
+                                                              (line  23)
+* debugger, commands, p (print) <1>:     Viewing And Changing Data.
+                                                              (line  39)
+* debugger, commands, print <1>:         Viewing And Changing Data.
+                                                              (line  39)
+* debugger, commands, printf:            Viewing And Changing Data.
+                                                              (line  57)
+* debugger, commands, set:               Viewing And Changing Data.
+                                                              (line  62)
+* debugger, commands, w (watch):         Viewing And Changing Data.
                                                               (line  70)
-* debugger commands, watch:              Viewing And Changing Data.
+* debugger, commands, watch:             Viewing And Changing Data.
                                                               (line  70)
-* debugger commands, where (backtrace):  Execution Stack.     (line  13)
-* debugger, b command:                   Finding The Bug.     (line  32)
-* debugger, backtrace command:           Finding The Bug.     (line  52)
-* debugger, break command:               Finding The Bug.     (line  32)
-* debugger, breakpoint command:          Finding The Bug.     (line  32)
-* debugger, bt command:                  Finding The Bug.     (line  52)
-* debugger, command completion:          Readline Support.    (line   6)
-* debugger, concepts:                    Debugging Terms.     (line   6)
+* debugger, commands, undisplay:         Viewing And Changing Data.
+                                                              (line  83)
+* debugger, commands, unwatch:           Viewing And Changing Data.
+                                                              (line  87)
+* debugger, commands, bt (backtrace) <1>: Execution Stack.    (line  13)
+* debugger, commands, backtrace <1>:     Execution Stack.     (line  13)
+* debugger, commands, where (backtrace): Execution Stack.     (line  13)
+* debugger, commands, down:              Execution Stack.     (line  23)
+* debugger, commands, f (frame):         Execution Stack.     (line  27)
+* debugger, commands, frame:             Execution Stack.     (line  27)
+* debugger, commands, up:                Execution Stack.     (line  36)
+* debugger, commands, i (info):          Debugger Info.       (line  13)
+* debugger, commands, info:              Debugger Info.       (line  13)
+* debugger, commands, o (option):        Debugger Info.       (line  57)
+* debugger, commands, option:            Debugger Info.       (line  57)
+* debugger, options:                     Debugger Info.       (line  57)
+* debugger, history size:                Debugger Info.       (line  65)
 * debugger, default list amount:         Debugger Info.       (line  69)
-* debugger, history expansion:           Readline Support.    (line   6)
+* debugger, prompt <1>:                  Debugger Info.       (line  78)
 * debugger, history file:                Debugger Info.       (line  81)
-* debugger, history size:                Debugger Info.       (line  65)
-* debugger, how to start:                Debugger Invocation. (line   6)
 * debugger, instruction tracing:         Debugger Info.       (line  90)
+* debugger, save commands to a file:     Debugger Info.       (line  92)
+* debugger, read commands from a file:   Debugger Info.       (line  97)
+* debugger, commands, dump:              Miscellaneous Debugger Commands.
+                                                              (line   9)
+* debugger, commands, h (help):          Miscellaneous Debugger Commands.
+                                                              (line  67)
+* debugger, commands, help:              Miscellaneous Debugger Commands.
+                                                              (line  67)
+* debugger, commands, l (list):          Miscellaneous Debugger Commands.
+                                                              (line  73)
+* debugger, commands, list:              Miscellaneous Debugger Commands.
+                                                              (line  73)
+* debugger, commands, q (quit):          Miscellaneous Debugger Commands.
+                                                              (line 100)
+* debugger, commands, quit:              Miscellaneous Debugger Commands.
+                                                              (line 100)
+* debugger, commands, trace:             Miscellaneous Debugger Commands.
+                                                              (line 108)
+* debugger, command completion:          Readline Support.    (line   6)
+* debugger, history expansion:           Readline Support.    (line   6)
+* debugger, limitations:                 Limitations.         (line   6)
 * debugger, interaction with namespaces: Namespace And Features.
                                                               (line  17)
-* debugger, limitations:                 Limitations.         (line   6)
-* debugger, n command:                   Finding The Bug.     (line 105)
-* debugger, next command:                Finding The Bug.     (line 105)
-* debugger, options:                     Debugger Info.       (line  57)
-* debugger, p command:                   Finding The Bug.     (line  68)
-* debugger, print command:               Finding The Bug.     (line  68)
-* debugger, printing all array elements: Finding The Bug.     (line 154)
-* debugger, printing single array elements: Finding The Bug.  (line 140)
-* debugger, prompt:                      Debugger Invocation. (line  23)
-* debugger, prompt <1>:                  Debugger Info.       (line  78)
-* debugger, read commands from a file:   Debugger Info.       (line  97)
-* debugger, repeating commands:          List of Debugger Commands.
-                                                              (line  21)
-* debugger, run command:                 Finding The Bug.     (line  39)
-* debugger, running the program:         Finding The Bug.     (line  39)
-* debugger, save commands to a file:     Debugger Info.       (line  92)
-* debugger, setting a breakpoint:        Finding The Bug.     (line  32)
-* debugger, stack frames, showing:       Finding The Bug.     (line  52)
-* debugging awk programs:                Debugger.            (line   6)
-* debugging gawk, bug reports:           Bugs.                (line   9)
+* debugging, awk programs:               Debugger.            (line   6)
 * debugging, example session:            Sample Debugging Session.
                                                               (line   6)
+* debugging gawk, bug reports:           Bugs.                (line   9)
 * decimal point character, locale specific: Options.          (line 295)
 * decrement operators:                   Increment Ops.       (line  35)
 * default keyword:                       Switch Statement.    (line   6)
@@ -34783,118 +34836,119 @@ Index
 * delete statement:                      Delete.              (line   6)
 * delete watchpoint:                     Viewing And Changing Data.
                                                               (line  87)
-* deleting elements in arrays:           Delete.              (line   6)
-* deleting entire arrays:                Delete.              (line  39)
+* deleting, elements in arrays:          Delete.              (line   6)
+* deleting, entire arrays:               Delete.              (line  39)
 * Demaille, Akim:                        Acknowledgments.     (line  60)
 * describe call stack frame, in debugger: Debugger Info.      (line  27)
-* differences in awk and gawk, ARGC/ARGV variables: ARGC and ARGV.
-                                                              (line  89)
-* differences in awk and gawk, ARGIND variable: Auto-set.     (line  44)
-* differences in awk and gawk, array elements, deleting: Delete.
-                                                              (line  39)
+* differences in awk and gawk, AWKPATH environment variable: AWKPATH Variable.
+                                                              (line   6)
 * differences in awk and gawk, AWKLIBPATH environment variable: AWKLIBPATH 
Variable.
                                                               (line   6)
-* differences in awk and gawk, AWKPATH environment variable: AWKPATH Variable.
+* differences in awk and gawk, regular expressions: Case-sensitivity.
+                                                              (line  26)
+* differences in awk and gawk, record separators: awk split records.
+                                                              (line 131)
+* differences in awk and gawk, RS/RT variables: awk split records.
+                                                              (line 131)
+* differences in awk and gawk, RS/RT variables <1>: gawk split records.
+                                                              (line  58)
+* differences in awk and gawk, strings, storing: gawk split records.
+                                                              (line  76)
+* differences in awk and gawk, single-character fields: Single Character 
Fields.
                                                               (line   6)
-* differences in awk and gawk, BEGIN/END patterns: I/O And BEGIN/END.
-                                                              (line  15)
-* differences in awk and gawk, BEGINFILE/ENDFILE patterns: BEGINFILE/ENDFILE.
+* differences in awk and gawk, RS/RT variables <2>: Multiple Line.
+                                                              (line 139)
+* differences in awk and gawk, getline command: Getline.      (line  19)
+* differences in awk and gawk, input/output operators: Getline/Coprocess.
                                                               (line   6)
-* differences in awk and gawk, BINMODE variable: User-modified.
-                                                              (line  15)
-* differences in awk and gawk, BINMODE variable <1>: PC Using.
-                                                              (line  20)
+* differences in awk and gawk, implementation limitations: Getline Notes.
+                                                              (line  14)
+* differences in awk and gawk, read timeouts: Read Timeout.   (line   6)
+* differences in awk and gawk, retrying input: Retrying Input.
+                                                              (line   6)
+* differences in awk and gawk, command-line directories: Command-line 
directories.
+                                                              (line   6)
+* differences in awk and gawk, print/printf statements: Format Modifiers.
+                                                              (line  13)
+* differences in awk and gawk, input/output operators <1>: Redirection.
+                                                              (line  96)
+* differences in awk and gawk, implementation limitations <1>: Redirection.
+                                                              (line 129)
+* differences in awk and gawk, error messages: Special FD.    (line  19)
 * differences in awk and gawk, close() function: Close Files And Pipes.
                                                               (line  81)
 * differences in awk and gawk, close() function <1>: Close Files And Pipes.
                                                               (line 132)
-* differences in awk and gawk, command-line directories: Command-line 
directories.
+* differences in awk and gawk, strings:  Scalar Constants.    (line  20)
+* differences in awk and gawk, strings <1>: Scalar Constants. (line  53)
+* differences in awk and gawk, regexp constants: Standard Regexp Constants.
+                                                              (line  43)
+* differences in awk and gawk, trunc-mod operation: Arithmetic Ops.
+                                                              (line  66)
+* differences in awk and gawk, line continuations: Conditional Exp.
+                                                              (line  34)
+* differences in awk and gawk, BEGIN/END patterns: I/O And BEGIN/END.
+                                                              (line  15)
+* differences in awk and gawk, BEGINFILE/ENDFILE patterns: BEGINFILE/ENDFILE.
                                                               (line   6)
-* differences in awk and gawk, ERRNO variable: Auto-set.      (line  87)
-* differences in awk and gawk, error messages: Special FD.    (line  19)
+* differences in awk and gawk, BINMODE variable: User-modified.
+                                                              (line  15)
 * differences in awk and gawk, FIELDWIDTHS variable: User-modified.
                                                               (line  37)
 * differences in awk and gawk, FPAT variable: User-modified.  (line  46)
-* differences in awk and gawk, FUNCTAB variable: Auto-set.    (line 134)
-* differences in awk and gawk, function arguments (gawk): Calling Built-in.
-                                                              (line  16)
-* differences in awk and gawk, getline command: Getline.      (line  19)
 * differences in awk and gawk, IGNORECASE variable: User-modified.
                                                               (line  79)
-* differences in awk and gawk, implementation limitations: Getline Notes.
-                                                              (line  14)
-* differences in awk and gawk, implementation limitations <1>: Redirection.
-                                                              (line 129)
-* differences in awk and gawk, indirect function calls: Indirect Calls.
-                                                              (line   6)
-* differences in awk and gawk, input/output operators: Getline/Coprocess.
-                                                              (line   6)
-* differences in awk and gawk, input/output operators <1>: Redirection.
-                                                              (line  96)
+* differences in awk and gawk, LINT variable: User-modified.  (line  90)
+* differences in awk and gawk, TEXTDOMAIN variable: User-modified.
+                                                              (line 155)
+* differences in awk and gawk, ARGIND variable: Auto-set.     (line  44)
+* differences in awk and gawk, ERRNO variable: Auto-set.      (line  87)
+* differences in awk and gawk, FUNCTAB variable: Auto-set.    (line 134)
+* differences in awk and gawk, PROCINFO array: Auto-set.      (line 148)
+* differences in awk and gawk, RS/RT variables <3>: Auto-set. (line 348)
+* differences in awk and gawk, SYMTAB variable: Auto-set.     (line 352)
+* differences in awk and gawk, ARGC/ARGV variables: ARGC and ARGV.
+                                                              (line  89)
+* differences in awk and gawk, array elements, deleting: Delete.
+                                                              (line  39)
+* differences in awk and gawk, function arguments: Calling Built-in.
+                                                              (line  16)
 * differences in awk and gawk, length() function: String Functions.
                                                               (line 201)
-* differences in awk and gawk, line continuations: Conditional Exp.
-                                                              (line  34)
-* differences in awk and gawk, LINT variable: User-modified.  (line  90)
 * differences in awk and gawk, match() function: String Functions.
                                                               (line 263)
-* differences in awk and gawk, print/printf statements: Format Modifiers.
-                                                              (line  13)
-* differences in awk and gawk, PROCINFO array: Auto-set.      (line 148)
-* differences in awk and gawk, read timeouts: Read Timeout.   (line   6)
-* differences in awk and gawk, record separators: awk split records.
-                                                              (line 131)
-* differences in awk and gawk, regexp constants: Standard Regexp Constants.
-                                                              (line  43)
-* differences in awk and gawk, regular expressions: Case-sensitivity.
-                                                              (line  26)
-* differences in awk and gawk, retrying input: Retrying Input.
-                                                              (line   6)
-* differences in awk and gawk, RS/RT variables: awk split records.
-                                                              (line 131)
-* differences in awk and gawk, RS/RT variables <1>: gawk split records.
-                                                              (line  58)
-* differences in awk and gawk, RS/RT variables <2>: Multiple Line.
-                                                              (line 139)
-* differences in awk and gawk, RS/RT variables <3>: Auto-set. (line 348)
-* differences in awk and gawk, single-character fields: Single Character 
Fields.
-                                                              (line   6)
 * differences in awk and gawk, split() function: String Functions.
                                                               (line 351)
-* differences in awk and gawk, strings:  Scalar Constants.    (line  20)
-* differences in awk and gawk, strings <1>: Scalar Constants. (line  53)
-* differences in awk and gawk, strings, storing: gawk split records.
-                                                              (line  76)
-* differences in awk and gawk, SYMTAB variable: Auto-set.     (line 352)
-* differences in awk and gawk, TEXTDOMAIN variable: User-modified.
-                                                              (line 155)
-* differences in awk and gawk, trunc-mod operation: Arithmetic Ops.
-                                                              (line  66)
-* directories, command-line:             Command-line directories.
+* differences in awk and gawk, indirect function calls: Indirect Calls.
+                                                              (line   6)
+* differences in awk and gawk, BINMODE variable <1>: PC Using.
+                                                              (line  20)
+* directories, searching, for source files: AWKPATH Variable. (line   6)
+* directories, searching, for loadable extensions: AWKLIBPATH Variable.
                                                               (line   6)
-* directories, searching:                Programs Exercises.  (line  70)
-* directories, searching for loadable extensions: AWKLIBPATH Variable.
+* directories, command-line:             Command-line directories.
                                                               (line   6)
-* directories, searching for source files: AWKPATH Variable.  (line   6)
+* directories, searching, for source files <1>: Programs Exercises.
+                                                              (line  70)
 * disable breakpoint:                    Breakpoint Control.  (line  69)
 * disable debugger command:              Breakpoint Control.  (line  69)
 * display debugger command:              Viewing And Changing Data.
                                                               (line   8)
 * display debugger options:              Debugger Info.       (line  57)
 * division:                              Arithmetic Ops.      (line  44)
-* do-while statement:                    Do Statement.        (line   6)
 * do-while statement, use of regexps in: Regexp Usage.        (line  19)
-* documentation, of awk programs:        Library Names.       (line   6)
+* do-while statement:                    Do Statement.        (line   6)
 * documentation, online:                 Manual History.      (line  11)
+* documentation, of awk programs:        Library Names.       (line   6)
 * documents, searching:                  Dupword Program.     (line   6)
+* dollar sign ($), regexp operator:      Regexp Operator Details.
+                                                              (line  31)
 * dollar sign ($), $ field operator:     Fields.              (line  19)
-* dollar sign ($), $ field operator <1>: Precedence.          (line  42)
 * dollar sign ($), incrementing fields and arrays: Increment Ops.
                                                               (line  30)
-* dollar sign ($), regexp operator:      Regexp Operator Details.
-                                                              (line  31)
-* double quote ("), in regexp constants: Computed Regexps.    (line  30)
+* dollar sign ($), $ field operator <1>: Precedence.          (line  42)
 * double quote ("), in shell commands:   Quoting.             (line  54)
+* double quote ("), in regexp constants: Computed Regexps.    (line  30)
 * double-precision:                      Computer Arithmetic. (line  61)
 * down debugger command:                 Execution Stack.     (line  23)
 * Drepper, Ulrich:                       Acknowledgments.     (line  52)
@@ -34907,49 +34961,48 @@ Index
 * dynamically loaded extensions:         Dynamic Extensions.  (line   6)
 * e debugger command (alias for enable): Breakpoint Control.  (line  73)
 * EBCDIC:                                Ordinal Functions.   (line  45)
+* EBCDIC <1>:                            Ranges and Locales.  (line  10)
+* EBCDIC <2>:                            History summary.     (line  20)
 * effective group ID of gawk user:       Auto-set.            (line 172)
 * effective user ID of gawk user:        Auto-set.            (line 180)
 * egrep utility:                         Bracket Expressions. (line  34)
 * egrep utility <1>:                     Egrep Program.       (line   6)
 * egrep.awk program:                     Egrep Program.       (line  53)
+* elements in arrays:                    Reference to Elements.
+                                                              (line   6)
 * elements in arrays, assigning values:  Assigning Elements.  (line   6)
-* elements in arrays, deleting:          Delete.              (line   6)
+* elements in arrays, scanning:          Scanning an Array.   (line   6)
 * elements in arrays, order of access by in operator: Scanning an Array.
                                                               (line  48)
-* elements in arrays, scanning:          Scanning an Array.   (line   6)
-* elements of arrays:                    Reference to Elements.
-                                                              (line   6)
+* elements in arrays, deleting:          Delete.              (line   6)
 * email address for bug reports, address@hidden: Bug address.
                                                               (line  31)
 * empty array elements:                  Reference to Elements.
                                                               (line  18)
 * empty pattern:                         Empty.               (line   6)
-* empty strings:                         awk split records.   (line 121)
-* empty strings, See null strings:       Regexp Field Splitting.
-                                                              (line  43)
 * EMRED:                                 TCP/IP Networking.   (line   6)
 * enable breakpoint:                     Breakpoint Control.  (line  73)
 * enable debugger command:               Breakpoint Control.  (line  73)
 * end debugger command:                  Debugger Execution Control.
                                                               (line  10)
+* END pattern, Boolean patterns and:     Expression Patterns. (line  70)
 * END pattern:                           BEGIN/END.           (line   6)
 * END pattern <1>:                       Using BEGIN/END.     (line   6)
-* END pattern, assert() user-defined function and: Assert Function.
-                                                              (line  75)
-* END pattern, Boolean patterns and:     Expression Patterns. (line  70)
-* END pattern, execution order not affected by @namespace: Changing The 
Namespace.
-                                                              (line  37)
-* END pattern, exit statement and:       Exit Statement.      (line  12)
+* END pattern, operators and:            Using BEGIN/END.     (line  17)
+* END pattern, print statement and:      I/O And BEGIN/END.   (line  15)
 * END pattern, next/nextfile statements and: I/O And BEGIN/END.
                                                               (line  36)
 * END pattern, next/nextfile statements and <1>: Next Statement.
                                                               (line  44)
-* END pattern, operators and:            Using BEGIN/END.     (line  17)
-* END pattern, print statement and:      I/O And BEGIN/END.   (line  15)
+* END pattern, exit statement and:       Exit Statement.      (line  12)
+* END pattern, assert() user-defined function and: Assert Function.
+                                                              (line  75)
 * END pattern, profiling and:            Profiling.           (line  62)
-* ENDFILE pattern:                       BEGINFILE/ENDFILE.   (line   6)
+* END pattern, @namespace directive and: Changing The Namespace.
+                                                              (line  37)
 * ENDFILE pattern, Boolean patterns and: Expression Patterns. (line  70)
-* ENDFILE pattern, execution order not affected by @namespace: Changing The 
Namespace.
+* ENDFILE pattern:                       BEGINFILE/ENDFILE.   (line   6)
+* ENDFILE pattern, @namespace directive and: Changing The Namespace.
                                                               (line  37)
 * endfile() user-defined function:       Filetrans Function.  (line  62)
 * endgrent() function (C library):       Group Functions.     (line 213)
@@ -34958,54 +35011,66 @@ Index
 * endpwent() user-defined function:      Passwd Functions.    (line 211)
 * English, Steve:                        Advanced Features.   (line   6)
 * ENVIRON array:                         Auto-set.            (line  59)
-* environment variables used by gawk:    Environment Variables.
+* environment variables, POSIXLY_CORRECT: Options.            (line 377)
+* environment variables, used by gawk:   Environment Variables.
                                                               (line   6)
+* environment variables, AWKPATH:        AWKPATH Variable.    (line   6)
+* environment variables, AWKLIBPATH:     AWKLIBPATH Variable. (line   6)
+* environment variables, GAWK_READ_TIMEOUT: Read Timeout.     (line  71)
+* environment variables, GAWK_SOCK_RETRIES: Nonfatal.         (line  53)
 * environment variables, in ENVIRON array: Auto-set.          (line  59)
+* environment variables, LANGUAGE:       Explaining gettext.  (line 120)
+* environment variables, GAWK_LOCALE_DIR: Explaining gettext. (line 132)
+* environment variables, LANGUAGE <1>:   I18N Example.        (line  68)
+* environment variables, LC_ALL:         I18N Example.        (line  68)
+* environment variables, LANG:           I18N Example.        (line  68)
+* environment variables, LC_MESSAGES:    I18N Example.        (line  68)
+* environment variables, AWKPATH <1>:    PC Using.            (line  13)
 * epoch, definition of:                  Glossary.            (line 310)
 * equals sign (=), = operator:           Assignment Ops.      (line   6)
 * equals sign (=), == operator:          Comparison Operators.
                                                               (line  11)
 * equals sign (=), == operator <1>:      Precedence.          (line  64)
 * EREs (Extended Regular Expressions):   Bracket Expressions. (line  34)
-* ERRNO variable:                        Auto-set.            (line  87)
-* ERRNO variable <1>:                    TCP/IP Networking.   (line  54)
-* ERRNO variable, with BEGINFILE pattern: BEGINFILE/ENDFILE.  (line  26)
+* ERRNO variable, with getline command:  Getline.             (line  19)
 * ERRNO variable, with close() function: Close Files And Pipes.
                                                               (line 140)
-* ERRNO variable, with getline command:  Getline.             (line  19)
+* ERRNO variable, with BEGINFILE pattern: BEGINFILE/ENDFILE.  (line  26)
+* ERRNO variable:                        Auto-set.            (line  87)
+* ERRNO variable <1>:                    TCP/IP Networking.   (line  54)
 * error handling:                        Special FD.          (line  19)
 * error handling, ERRNO variable and:    Auto-set.            (line  87)
 * error output:                          Special FD.          (line   6)
 * escape processing, gsub()/gensub()/sub() functions: Gory Details.
                                                               (line   6)
-* escape sequences, in strings:          Escape Sequences.    (line   6)
+* escape sequences:                      Escape Sequences.    (line   6)
 * eval debugger command:                 Viewing And Changing Data.
                                                               (line  23)
 * evaluate expressions, in debugger:     Viewing And Changing Data.
                                                               (line  23)
-* evaluation order:                      Increment Ops.       (line  60)
 * evaluation order, concatenation:       Concatenation.       (line  41)
+* evaluation order:                      Increment Ops.       (line  60)
 * evaluation order, functions:           Calling Built-in.    (line  30)
 * examining fields:                      Fields.              (line   6)
 * example debugging session:             Sample Debugging Session.
                                                               (line   6)
-* exclamation point (!), ! operator:     Boolean Ops.         (line  69)
-* exclamation point (!), ! operator <1>: Precedence.          (line  51)
-* exclamation point (!), ! operator <2>: Egrep Program.       (line 174)
-* exclamation point (!), != operator:    Comparison Operators.
-                                                              (line  11)
-* exclamation point (!), != operator <1>: Precedence.         (line  64)
 * exclamation point (!), !~ operator:    Regexp Usage.        (line  19)
 * exclamation point (!), !~ operator <1>: Computed Regexps.   (line   6)
 * exclamation point (!), !~ operator <2>: Case-sensitivity.   (line  26)
 * exclamation point (!), !~ operator <3>: Regexp Constants.   (line   6)
+* exclamation point (!), != operator:    Comparison Operators.
+                                                              (line  11)
 * exclamation point (!), !~ operator <4>: Comparison Operators.
                                                               (line  11)
 * exclamation point (!), !~ operator <5>: Comparison Operators.
                                                               (line  98)
+* exclamation point (!), ! operator:     Boolean Ops.         (line  69)
+* exclamation point (!), ! operator <1>: Precedence.          (line  51)
+* exclamation point (!), != operator <1>: Precedence.         (line  64)
 * exclamation point (!), !~ operator <6>: Precedence.         (line  79)
 * exclamation point (!), !~ operator <7>: Expression Patterns.
                                                               (line  24)
+* exclamation point (!), ! operator <2>: Egrep Program.       (line 174)
 * exit debugger command:                 Miscellaneous Debugger Commands.
                                                               (line  64)
 * exit statement:                        Exit Statement.      (line   6)
@@ -35020,55 +35085,55 @@ Index
 * Expat XML parser library:              gawkextlib.          (line  40)
 * exponent:                              Numeric Functions.   (line  19)
 * expressions:                           Expressions.         (line   6)
-* expressions, as patterns:              Expression Patterns. (line   6)
 * expressions, assignment:               Assignment Ops.      (line   6)
-* expressions, Boolean:                  Boolean Ops.         (line   6)
 * expressions, comparison:               Typing and Comparison.
                                                               (line   9)
+* expressions, Boolean:                  Boolean Ops.         (line   6)
 * expressions, conditional:              Conditional Exp.     (line   6)
-* expressions, matching, See comparison expressions: Typing and Comparison.
-                                                              (line   9)
 * expressions, selecting:                Conditional Exp.     (line   6)
+* expressions, as patterns:              Expression Patterns. (line   6)
 * Extended Regular Expressions (EREs):   Bracket Expressions. (line  34)
+* extension API, version number:         Auto-set.            (line 287)
+* extension API, interaction with namespaces: Namespace And Features.
+                                                              (line  22)
 * extension API:                         Extension API Description.
                                                               (line   6)
-* extension API informational variables: Extension API Informational Variables.
+* extension API, version number <1>:     Extension Versioning.
                                                               (line   6)
-* extension API interaction with namespaces: Namespace And Features.
-                                                              (line  22)
-* extension API version:                 Extension Versioning.
-                                                              (line   6)
-* extension API, version number:         Auto-set.            (line 287)
-* extension example:                     Extension Example.   (line   6)
-* extension registration:                Registration Functions.
+* extension API, informational variables: Extension API Informational 
Variables.
                                                               (line   6)
-* extension search path:                 Finding Extensions.  (line   6)
-* extensions distributed with gawk:      Extension Samples.   (line   6)
-* extensions, allocating memory:         Memory Allocation Functions.
+* extensions, loadable, loading, @load directive: Loading Shared Libraries.
+                                                              (line   8)
+* extensions, common, \x escape sequence: Escape Sequences.   (line  61)
+* extensions, common, RS as a regexp:    gawk split records.  (line   6)
+* extensions, common, single character fields: Single Character Fields.
                                                               (line   6)
-* extensions, array manipulation in:     Array Manipulation.  (line   6)
-* extensions, Brian Kernighan's awk:     BTL.                 (line   6)
-* extensions, Brian Kernighan's awk <1>: Common Extensions.   (line   6)
-* extensions, common, ** operator:       Arithmetic Ops.      (line  30)
-* extensions, common, **= operator:      Assignment Ops.      (line 138)
-* extensions, common, /dev/stderr special file: Special FD.   (line  48)
 * extensions, common, /dev/stdin special file: Special FD.    (line  48)
 * extensions, common, /dev/stdout special file: Special FD.   (line  48)
-* extensions, common, BINMODE variable:  PC Using.            (line  20)
+* extensions, common, /dev/stderr special file: Special FD.   (line  48)
+* extensions, common, ** operator:       Arithmetic Ops.      (line  30)
+* extensions, common, **= operator:      Assignment Ops.      (line 138)
 * extensions, common, delete to delete entire arrays: Delete. (line  39)
-* extensions, common, fflush() function: I/O Functions.       (line  43)
-* extensions, common, func keyword:      Definition Syntax.   (line  99)
 * extensions, common, length() applied to an array: String Functions.
                                                               (line 201)
-* extensions, common, RS as a regexp:    gawk split records.  (line   6)
-* extensions, common, single character fields: Single Character Fields.
+* extensions, common, fflush() function: I/O Functions.       (line  43)
+* extensions, common, func keyword:      Definition Syntax.   (line  99)
+* extensions, loadable, allocating memory: Memory Allocation Functions.
                                                               (line   6)
-* extensions, common, \x escape sequence: Escape Sequences.   (line  61)
+* extensions, loadable, registration:    Registration Functions.
+                                                              (line   6)
+* extensions, loadable, array manipulation in: Array Manipulation.
+                                                              (line   6)
+* extensions, loadable, search path:     Finding Extensions.  (line   6)
+* extensions, loadable, example:         Extension Example.   (line   6)
+* extensions, loadable, distributed with gawk: Extension Samples.
+                                                              (line   6)
+* extensions, loadable, gawkextlib project: gawkextlib.       (line   6)
+* extensions, Brian Kernighan's awk:     BTL.                 (line   6)
 * extensions, in gawk, not in POSIX awk: POSIX/GNU.           (line   6)
-* extensions, loading, @load directive:  Loading Shared Libraries.
-                                                              (line   8)
+* extensions, Brian Kernighan's awk <1>: Common Extensions.   (line   6)
 * extensions, mawk:                      Common Extensions.   (line   6)
-* extensions, where to find:             gawkextlib.          (line   6)
+* extensions, common, BINMODE variable:  PC Using.            (line  20)
 * extract.awk program:                   Extract Program.     (line  79)
 * extraction, of marked strings (internationalization): String Extraction.
                                                               (line   6)
@@ -35076,109 +35141,112 @@ Index
 * false, logical:                        Truth Values.        (line   6)
 * FDL (Free Documentation License):      GNU Free Documentation License.
                                                               (line   8)
-* features, adding to gawk:              Adding Code.         (line   6)
 * features, deprecated:                  Obsolete.            (line   6)
 * features, undocumented:                Undocumented.        (line   6)
+* features, adding to gawk:              Adding Code.         (line   6)
 * Fenlason, Jay:                         History.             (line  30)
 * Fenlason, Jay <1>:                     Contributors.        (line  19)
 * fflush:                                I/O Functions.       (line  28)
 * field numbers:                         Nonconstant Fields.  (line   6)
 * field operator $:                      Fields.              (line  19)
 * field operators, dollar sign as:       Fields.              (line  19)
-* field separator, backslash (\) as:     Command Line Field Separator.
-                                                              (line  24)
-* field separator, in multiline records: Multiple Line.       (line  41)
-* field separator, on command line:      Command Line Field Separator.
+* field separator:                       Field Separators.    (line  15)
+* field separator, choice of:            Field Separators.    (line  50)
+* field separator, regular expression as: Field Separators.   (line  50)
+* field separator, whitespace as:        Default Field Splitting.
                                                               (line   6)
-* field separator, POSIX and:            Full Line Fields.    (line  16)
-* field separators:                      Field Separators.    (line  15)
-* field separators <1>:                  User-modified.       (line  53)
-* field separators <2>:                  User-modified.       (line 116)
-* field separators, choice of:           Field Separators.    (line  50)
-* field separators, FIELDWIDTHS variable and: User-modified.  (line  37)
-* field separators, FPAT variable and:   User-modified.       (line  46)
-* field separators, regular expressions as: Field Separators. (line  50)
-* field separators, regular expressions as <1>: Regexp Field Splitting.
+* field separator, FS variable and:      Default Field Splitting.
+                                                              (line   6)
+* field separator, regular expression as <1>: Regexp Field Splitting.
                                                               (line   6)
-* field separators, See Also OFS:        Changing Fields.     (line  64)
-* field separators, spaces as:           Cut Program.         (line 103)
-* field separators, whitespace as:       Default Field Splitting.
+* field separator, on command line:      Command Line Field Separator.
                                                               (line   6)
+* field separator, backslash (\) as:     Command Line Field Separator.
+                                                              (line  24)
+* field separator, POSIX and:            Full Line Fields.    (line  16)
+* field separator, in multiline records: Multiple Line.       (line  41)
+* field separator, FIELDWIDTHS variable and: User-modified.   (line  37)
+* field separator, FPAT variable and:    User-modified.       (line  46)
+* field separator <1>:                   User-modified.       (line  53)
+* field separator <2>:                   User-modified.       (line 116)
+* field separator, spaces as:            Cut Program.         (line 103)
+* field separator <3>:                   Changing Fields.     (line  64)
 * fields:                                Reading Files.       (line  14)
 * fields <1>:                            Fields.              (line   6)
-* fields <2>:                            Basic High Level.    (line  62)
-* fields, adding:                        Changing Fields.     (line  53)
-* fields, changing contents of:          Changing Fields.     (line   6)
-* fields, cutting:                       Cut Program.         (line   6)
 * fields, examining:                     Fields.              (line   6)
 * fields, number of:                     Fields.              (line  33)
 * fields, numbers:                       Nonconstant Fields.  (line   6)
-* fields, printing:                      Print Examples.      (line  20)
+* fields, changing contents of:          Changing Fields.     (line   6)
+* fields, adding:                        Changing Fields.     (line  53)
 * fields, separating:                    Field Separators.    (line  15)
 * fields, separating <1>:                Field Separators.    (line  15)
 * fields, single-character:              Single Character Fields.
                                                               (line   6)
+* fields, printing:                      Print Examples.      (line  20)
+* fields, cutting:                       Cut Program.         (line   6)
+* fields <2>:                            Basic High Level.    (line  62)
 * FIELDWIDTHS variable:                  Fixed width data.    (line  17)
 * FIELDWIDTHS variable <1>:              User-modified.       (line  37)
 * file descriptors:                      Special FD.          (line   6)
 * file inclusion, @include directive:    Include Files.       (line   8)
-* file names, assignments as:            Ignoring Assigns.    (line   6)
-* file names, distinguishing:            Auto-set.            (line  55)
-* file names, in compatibility mode:     Special Caveats.     (line   9)
 * file names, standard streams in gawk:  Special FD.          (line  48)
+* file names, in compatibility mode:     Special Caveats.     (line   9)
+* file names, distinguishing:            Auto-set.            (line  55)
+* file names, assignments as:            Ignoring Assigns.    (line   6)
 * FILENAME variable:                     Reading Files.       (line   6)
-* FILENAME variable <1>:                 Auto-set.            (line 108)
 * FILENAME variable, getline, setting with: Getline Notes.    (line  19)
-* files, .gmo:                           Explaining gettext.  (line  42)
-* files, .gmo, specifying directory of:  Explaining gettext.  (line  54)
-* files, .gmo, specifying directory of <1>: Programmer i18n.  (line  48)
-* files, .mo, converting from .po:       I18N Example.        (line  80)
-* files, .po:                            Explaining gettext.  (line  37)
-* files, .po <1>:                        Translator i18n.     (line   6)
-* files, .po, converting to .mo:         I18N Example.        (line  80)
-* files, .pot:                           Explaining gettext.  (line  31)
-* files, /dev/... special files:         Special FD.          (line  48)
-* files, /inet/... (gawk):               TCP/IP Networking.   (line   6)
-* files, /inet4/... (gawk):              TCP/IP Networking.   (line   6)
-* files, /inet6/... (gawk):              TCP/IP Networking.   (line   6)
+* FILENAME variable <1>:                 Auto-set.            (line 108)
+* files, input:                          Read Terminal.       (line  16)
 * files, awk programs in:                Long.                (line   6)
-* files, awkprof.out:                    Profiling.           (line   6)
 * files, awkvars.out:                    Options.             (line  98)
+* files, portable object, generating:    Options.             (line 169)
+* files, multiple passes over:           Other Arguments.     (line  62)
+* files, reading, multiline records:     Multiple Line.       (line   6)
+* files, descriptors:                    Special FD.          (line   6)
+* files, /dev/... special files:         Special FD.          (line  48)
+* files, output:                         Close Files And Pipes.
+                                                              (line   6)
+* files, processing, ARGIND variable and: Auto-set.           (line  50)
 * files, closing:                        I/O Functions.       (line  10)
-* files, descriptors, See file descriptors: Special FD.       (line   6)
-* files, group:                          Group Functions.     (line   6)
-* files, initialization and cleanup:     Filetrans Function.  (line   6)
-* files, input, See input files:         Read Terminal.       (line  16)
 * files, log, timestamps in:             Time Functions.      (line   6)
 * files, managing:                       Data File Management.
                                                               (line   6)
 * files, managing, data file boundaries: Filetrans Function.  (line   6)
+* files, initialization and cleanup:     Filetrans Function.  (line   6)
+* files, reading:                        Rewind Function.     (line   6)
+* files, skipping:                       File Checking.       (line   6)
+* files, password:                       Passwd Functions.    (line  16)
+* files, group:                          Group Functions.     (line   6)
+* files, searching for regular expressions: Egrep Program.    (line   6)
+* files, splitting:                      Split Program.       (line   6)
+* files, multiple, duplicating output into: Tee Program.      (line   6)
+* files, Texinfo, extracting programs from: Extract Program.  (line   6)
+* files, source, search path for:        Programs Exercises.  (line  70)
+* files, /inet/... (gawk):               TCP/IP Networking.   (line   6)
+* files, /inet4/... (gawk):              TCP/IP Networking.   (line   6)
+* files, /inet6/... (gawk):              TCP/IP Networking.   (line   6)
+* files, awkprof.out:                    Profiling.           (line   6)
+* files, .pot:                           Explaining gettext.  (line  31)
+* files, portable object, template file (.pot): Explaining gettext.
+                                                              (line  31)
+* files, .po:                            Explaining gettext.  (line  37)
+* files, portable object:                Explaining gettext.  (line  37)
+* files, .gmo:                           Explaining gettext.  (line  42)
 * files, message object:                 Explaining gettext.  (line  42)
-* files, message object, converting from portable object files: I18N Example.
-                                                              (line  80)
+* files, .gmo, specifying directory of:  Explaining gettext.  (line  54)
 * files, message object, specifying directory of: Explaining gettext.
                                                               (line  54)
+* files, .gmo, specifying directory of <1>: Programmer i18n.  (line  48)
 * files, message object, specifying directory of <1>: Programmer i18n.
                                                               (line  48)
-* files, multiple passes over:           Other Arguments.     (line  62)
-* files, multiple, duplicating output into: Tee Program.      (line   6)
-* files, output, See output files:       Close Files And Pipes.
-                                                              (line   6)
-* files, password:                       Passwd Functions.    (line  16)
-* files, portable object:                Explaining gettext.  (line  37)
+* files, .po <1>:                        Translator i18n.     (line   6)
 * files, portable object <1>:            Translator i18n.     (line   6)
-* files, portable object template:       Explaining gettext.  (line  31)
+* files, .po, converting to .mo:         I18N Example.        (line  80)
+* files, .mo, converting from .po:       I18N Example.        (line  80)
 * files, portable object, converting to message object files: I18N Example.
                                                               (line  80)
-* files, portable object, generating:    Options.             (line 169)
-* files, processing, ARGIND variable and: Auto-set.           (line  50)
-* files, reading:                        Rewind Function.     (line   6)
-* files, reading, multiline records:     Multiple Line.       (line   6)
-* files, searching for regular expressions: Egrep Program.    (line   6)
-* files, skipping:                       File Checking.       (line   6)
-* files, source, search path for:        Programs Exercises.  (line  70)
-* files, splitting:                      Split Program.       (line   6)
-* files, Texinfo, extracting programs from: Extract Program.  (line   6)
+* files, message object, converting from portable object files: I18N Example.
+                                                              (line  80)
 * find substring in string:              String Functions.    (line 156)
 * finding extensions:                    Finding Extensions.  (line   6)
 * finish debugger command:               Debugger Execution Control.
@@ -35187,16 +35255,16 @@ Index
 * fixed-width data:                      Constant Size.       (line   6)
 * flag variables:                        Boolean Ops.         (line  69)
 * flag variables <1>:                    Tee Program.         (line  20)
-* floating-point, numbers:               Computer Arithmetic. (line  49)
 * floating-point, numbers, arbitrary-precision: Arbitrary Precision Arithmetic.
                                                               (line   6)
-* floating-point, numbers, arbitrary-precision <1>: Computer Arithmetic.
+* floating-point, numbers:               Computer Arithmetic. (line  49)
+* floating-point, numbers, single-precision: Computer Arithmetic.
                                                               (line  61)
 * floating-point, numbers, double-precision: Computer Arithmetic.
                                                               (line  61)
-* floating-point, numbers, single-precision: Computer Arithmetic.
+* floating-point, numbers, arbitrary-precision <1>: Computer Arithmetic.
                                                               (line  61)
-* floating-point, VAX/VMS:               VMS Running.         (line  50)
+* floating-point, numbers, VAX/VMS:      VMS Running.         (line  50)
 * flush buffered output:                 I/O Functions.       (line  28)
 * fnmatch() extension function:          Extension Sample Fnmatch.
                                                               (line  12)
@@ -35208,21 +35276,21 @@ Index
 * fork() extension function:             Extension Sample Fork.
                                                               (line  11)
 * format specifiers:                     Basic Printf.        (line  15)
-* format specifiers, mixing regular with positional specifiers: Printf 
Ordering.
-                                                              (line  57)
 * format specifiers, printf statement:   Control Letters.     (line   6)
 * format specifiers, strftime() function (gawk): Time Functions.
                                                               (line  91)
+* format specifiers, mixing regular with positional specifiers: Printf 
Ordering.
+                                                              (line  57)
 * format time string:                    Time Functions.      (line  50)
 * formats, numeric output:               OFMT.                (line   6)
-* formatting output:                     Printf.              (line   6)
-* formatting strings:                    String Functions.    (line 389)
-* forward slash (/) to enclose regular expressions: Regexp.   (line  10)
-* forward slash (/), / operator:         Precedence.          (line  54)
+* formatting, output:                    Printf.              (line   6)
+* formatting, strings:                   String Functions.    (line 389)
+* forward slash (/), to enclose regular expressions: Regexp.  (line  10)
 * forward slash (/), /= operator:        Assignment Ops.      (line 129)
-* forward slash (/), /= operator <1>:    Precedence.          (line  94)
-* forward slash (/), /= operator, vs. /=.../ regexp constant: Assignment Ops.
+* forward slash (/), /= operator, vs.  /=.../ regexp constant: Assignment Ops.
                                                               (line 149)
+* forward slash (/), / operator:         Precedence.          (line  54)
+* forward slash (/), /= operator <1>:    Precedence.          (line  94)
 * forward slash (/), patterns and:       Expression Patterns. (line  24)
 * FPAT variable:                         Splitting By Content.
                                                               (line  25)
@@ -35235,19 +35303,19 @@ Index
 * Free Software Foundation (FSF) <2>:    Glossary.            (line 370)
 * Free Software Foundation (FSF) <3>:    Glossary.            (line 403)
 * FreeBSD:                               Glossary.            (line 746)
-* FS variable:                           Field Separators.    (line  15)
-* FS variable <1>:                       User-modified.       (line  53)
 * FS variable, --field-separator option and: Options.         (line  21)
-* FS variable, as null string:           Single Character Fields.
-                                                              (line  20)
+* FS variable, TAB character as:         Options.             (line 292)
+* FS variable:                           Field Separators.    (line  15)
 * FS variable, changing value of:        Field Separators.    (line  34)
-* FS variable, running awk programs and: Cut Program.         (line  63)
+* FS variable, containing ^:             Regexp Field Splitting.
+                                                              (line  59)
+* FS variable, null string as:           Single Character Fields.
+                                                              (line  20)
 * FS variable, setting from command line: Command Line Field Separator.
                                                               (line   6)
-* FS variable, TAB character as:         Options.             (line 292)
-* FS, containing ^:                      Regexp Field Splitting.
-                                                              (line  59)
-* FS, in multiline records:              Multiple Line.       (line  41)
+* FS variable, in multiline records:     Multiple Line.       (line  41)
+* FS variable <1>:                       User-modified.       (line  53)
+* FS variable, running awk programs and: Cut Program.         (line  63)
 * FSF (Free Software Foundation):        Manual History.      (line   6)
 * FSF (Free Software Foundation) <1>:    Getting.             (line  10)
 * FSF (Free Software Foundation) <2>:    Glossary.            (line 370)
@@ -35255,150 +35323,154 @@ Index
 * fts() extension function:              Extension Sample File Functions.
                                                               (line  60)
 * FUNCTAB array:                         Auto-set.            (line 134)
+* function arguments, show in debugger:  Debugger Info.       (line  18)
 * function calls:                        Function Calls.      (line   6)
 * function calls, indirect:              Indirect Calls.      (line   6)
 * function calls, indirect, @-notation for: Indirect Calls.   (line  47)
 * function definition example:           Function Example.    (line   6)
+* function definitions, list in debugger: Debugger Info.      (line  30)
 * function pointers:                     Indirect Calls.      (line   6)
-* functions, arrays as parameters to:    Pass By Value/Reference.
-                                                              (line  44)
 * functions, built-in:                   Function Calls.      (line  10)
+* functions, user-defined, next/nextfile statements and: Next Statement.
+                                                              (line  44)
+* functions, user-defined, next/nextfile statements and <1>: Nextfile 
Statement.
+                                                              (line  47)
 * functions, built-in <1>:               Functions.           (line   6)
 * functions, built-in, evaluation order: Calling Built-in.    (line  30)
+* functions, string-translation:         I18N Functions.      (line   6)
+* functions, user-defined:               User-defined.        (line   6)
 * functions, defining:                   Definition Syntax.   (line  10)
+* functions, names of:                   Definition Syntax.   (line  24)
+* functions, recursive:                  Definition Syntax.   (line  89)
+* functions, user-defined, calling:      Function Calling.    (line   6)
+* functions, arrays as parameters to:    Pass By Value/Reference.
+                                                              (line  44)
+* functions, undefined:                  Function Caveats.    (line   6)
 * functions, library:                    Library Functions.   (line   6)
-* functions, library, assertions:        Assert Function.     (line   6)
+* functions, user-defined, library of:   Library Functions.   (line   6)
 * functions, library, associative arrays and: Library Names.  (line  58)
-* functions, library, C library:         Getopt Function.     (line   6)
-* functions, library, character values as numbers: Ordinal Functions.
-                                                              (line   6)
+* functions, library, assertions:        Assert Function.     (line   6)
+* functions, library, rounding numbers:  Round Function.      (line   6)
 * functions, library, Cliff random numbers: Cliff Random Function.
                                                               (line   6)
-* functions, library, command-line options: Getopt Function.  (line   6)
-* functions, library, example program for using: Igawk Program.
-                                                              (line   6)
-* functions, library, group database, reading: Group Functions.
+* functions, library, character values as numbers: Ordinal Functions.
                                                               (line   6)
-* functions, library, managing data files: Data File Management.
+* functions, library, merging arrays into strings: Join Function.
                                                               (line   6)
 * functions, library, managing time:     Getlocaltime Function.
                                                               (line   6)
-* functions, library, merging arrays into strings: Join Function.
+* functions, library, managing data files: Data File Management.
                                                               (line   6)
-* functions, library, rounding numbers:  Round Function.      (line   6)
+* functions, library, command-line options: Getopt Function.  (line   6)
+* functions, library, C library:         Getopt Function.     (line   6)
 * functions, library, user database, reading: Passwd Functions.
                                                               (line   6)
-* functions, names of:                   Definition Syntax.   (line  24)
-* functions, recursive:                  Definition Syntax.   (line  89)
-* functions, string-translation:         I18N Functions.      (line   6)
-* functions, undefined:                  Function Caveats.    (line   6)
-* functions, user-defined:               User-defined.        (line   6)
-* functions, user-defined, calling:      Function Calling.    (line   6)
+* functions, library, group database, reading: Group Functions.
+                                                              (line   6)
+* functions, library, example program for using: Igawk Program.
+                                                              (line   6)
 * functions, user-defined, counts, in a profile: Profiling.   (line 137)
-* functions, user-defined, library of:   Library Functions.   (line   6)
-* functions, user-defined, next/nextfile statements and: Next Statement.
-                                                              (line  44)
-* functions, user-defined, next/nextfile statements and <1>: Nextfile 
Statement.
-                                                              (line  47)
 * G-d:                                   Acknowledgments.     (line  94)
 * G., Daniel Richard:                    Acknowledgments.     (line  60)
 * G., Daniel Richard <1>:                Maintainers.         (line  14)
 * Garfinkle, Scott:                      Contributors.        (line  35)
-* gawk program, dynamic profiling:       Profiling.           (line 179)
-* gawk version:                          Auto-set.            (line 262)
-* gawk, ARGIND variable in:              Other Arguments.     (line  21)
+* gawk:                                  Preface.             (line  13)
 * gawk, awk and:                         Preface.             (line  21)
+* gawk, uses for:                        Preface.             (line  34)
 * gawk, awk and <1>:                     This Manual.         (line  14)
-* gawk, bitwise operations in:           Bitwise Functions.   (line  40)
-* gawk, break statement in:              Break Statement.     (line  51)
+* gawk, newlines in:                     Statements/Lines.    (line  12)
+* gawk, extensions, disabling:           Options.             (line 283)
+* gawk, version of, printing information about: Options.      (line 331)
+* gawk, ARGIND variable in:              Other Arguments.     (line  21)
+* gawk, escape sequences:                Escape Sequences.    (line 121)
+* gawk, escape sequences <1>:            Escape Sequences.    (line 121)
+* gawk, regular expressions, precedence: Regexp Operator Details.
+                                                              (line 142)
+* gawk, interval expressions and:        Interval Expressions.
+                                                              (line  10)
 * gawk, character classes and:           Bracket Expressions. (line 112)
-* gawk, coding style in:                 Adding Code.         (line  37)
-* gawk, command-line options, and regular expressions: GNU Regexp Operators.
-                                                              (line  73)
-* gawk, configuring:                     Configuration Philosophy.
-                                                              (line   6)
-* gawk, configuring, options:            Additional Configuration Options.
+* gawk, regular expressions, operators:  GNU Regexp Operators.
                                                               (line   6)
-* gawk, continue statement in:           Continue Statement.  (line  44)
-* gawk, distribution:                    Distribution contents.
+* gawk, word-boundary operator:          GNU Regexp Operators.
+                                                              (line  66)
+* gawk, command-line options, regular expressions and: GNU Regexp Operators.
+                                                              (line  73)
+* gawk, regular expressions, case sensitivity: Case-sensitivity.
+                                                              (line  26)
+* gawk, IGNORECASE variable in:          Case-sensitivity.    (line  26)
+* gawk, RT variable in:                  awk split records.   (line 131)
+* gawk, RT variable in <1>:              gawk split records.  (line  58)
+* gawk, FIELDWIDTHS variable in:         Fixed width data.    (line  17)
+* gawk, FPAT variable in:                Splitting By Content.
+                                                              (line  25)
+* gawk, splitting fields and:            Testing field creation.
                                                               (line   6)
+* gawk, RT variable in <2>:              Multiple Line.       (line 139)
 * gawk, ERRNO variable in:               Getline.             (line  19)
+* gawk, implementation issues, limits:   Getline Notes.       (line  14)
+* gawk, format-control characters:       Control Letters.     (line  33)
+* gawk, format-control characters <1>:   Control Letters.     (line 108)
+* gawk, implementation issues, pipes:    Redirection.         (line 129)
+* gawk, file names in:                   Special Files.       (line   6)
 * gawk, ERRNO variable in <1>:           Close Files And Pipes.
                                                               (line 140)
+* gawk, octal numbers and:               Nondecimal-numbers.  (line  41)
+* gawk, hexadecimal numbers and:         Nondecimal-numbers.  (line  41)
+* gawk, regexp constants and:            Standard Regexp Constants.
+                                                              (line  28)
+* gawk, line continuation in:            Conditional Exp.     (line  34)
 * gawk, ERRNO variable in <2>:           BEGINFILE/ENDFILE.   (line  26)
-* gawk, ERRNO variable in <3>:           Auto-set.            (line  87)
-* gawk, ERRNO variable in <4>:           TCP/IP Networking.   (line  54)
-* gawk, escape sequences:                Escape Sequences.    (line 121)
-* gawk, extensions, disabling:           Options.             (line 283)
-* gawk, features, adding:                Adding Code.         (line   6)
-* gawk, features, advanced:              Advanced Features.   (line   6)
-* gawk, field separators and:            User-modified.       (line  74)
-* gawk, FIELDWIDTHS variable in:         Fixed width data.    (line  17)
+* gawk, break statement in:              Break Statement.     (line  51)
+* gawk, continue statement in:           Continue Statement.  (line  44)
+* gawk, predefined variables and:        Built-in Variables.  (line  14)
 * gawk, FIELDWIDTHS variable in <1>:     User-modified.       (line  37)
-* gawk, file names in:                   Special Files.       (line   6)
-* gawk, format-control characters:       Control Letters.     (line  33)
-* gawk, format-control characters <1>:   Control Letters.     (line 108)
-* gawk, FPAT variable in:                Splitting By Content.
-                                                              (line  25)
 * gawk, FPAT variable in <1>:            User-modified.       (line  46)
-* gawk, FUNCTAB array in:                Auto-set.            (line 134)
-* gawk, function arguments and:          Calling Built-in.    (line  16)
-* gawk, hexadecimal numbers and:         Nondecimal-numbers.  (line  41)
-* gawk, IGNORECASE variable in:          Case-sensitivity.    (line  26)
+* gawk, field separators and:            User-modified.       (line  74)
 * gawk, IGNORECASE variable in <1>:      User-modified.       (line  79)
+* gawk, LINT variable in:                User-modified.       (line  90)
+* gawk, TEXTDOMAIN variable in:          User-modified.       (line 155)
+* gawk, ERRNO variable in <3>:           Auto-set.            (line  87)
+* gawk, FUNCTAB array in:                Auto-set.            (line 134)
+* gawk, PROCINFO array in:               Auto-set.            (line 148)
+* gawk, version of:                      Auto-set.            (line 262)
+* gawk, RT variable in <3>:              Auto-set.            (line 348)
+* gawk, SYMTAB array in:                 Auto-set.            (line 352)
 * gawk, IGNORECASE variable in <2>:      Array Intro.         (line 100)
+* gawk, function arguments and:          Calling Built-in.    (line  16)
 * gawk, IGNORECASE variable in <3>:      String Functions.    (line  58)
+* gawk, timestamps:                      Time Functions.      (line   6)
+* gawk, PROCINFO array in <1>:           Time Functions.      (line  49)
+* gawk, bitwise operations in:           Bitwise Functions.   (line  40)
+* gawk, string-translation functions:    I18N Functions.      (line   6)
+* gawk, features, advanced:              Advanced Features.   (line   6)
 * gawk, IGNORECASE variable in <4>:      Array Sorting Functions.
                                                               (line  83)
-* gawk, implementation issues:           Notes.               (line   6)
-* gawk, implementation issues, debugging: Compatibility Mode. (line   6)
-* gawk, implementation issues, downward compatibility: Compatibility Mode.
-                                                              (line   6)
-* gawk, implementation issues, limits:   Getline Notes.       (line  14)
-* gawk, implementation issues, pipes:    Redirection.         (line 129)
-* gawk, installing:                      Installation.        (line   6)
-* gawk, internationalization and, See internationalization: 
Internationalization.
+* gawk, PROCINFO array in <2>:           Two-way I/O.         (line 114)
+* gawk, ERRNO variable in <4>:           TCP/IP Networking.   (line  54)
+* gawk, dynamic profiling:               Profiling.           (line 179)
+* gawk, profiling programs:              Profiling.           (line 179)
+* gawk, internationalization:            Internationalization.
                                                               (line  13)
 * gawk, interpreter, adding code to:     Using Internal File Ops.
                                                               (line   6)
-* gawk, interval expressions and:        Interval Expressions.
-                                                              (line  10)
-* gawk, line continuation in:            Conditional Exp.     (line  34)
-* gawk, LINT variable in:                User-modified.       (line  90)
 * gawk, list of contributors to:         Contributors.        (line   6)
-* gawk, MS-Windows version of:           PC Using.            (line  13)
-* gawk, newlines in:                     Statements/Lines.    (line  12)
-* gawk, octal numbers and:               Nondecimal-numbers.  (line  41)
-* gawk, predefined variables and:        Built-in Variables.  (line  14)
-* gawk, PROCINFO array in:               Auto-set.            (line 148)
-* gawk, PROCINFO array in <1>:           Time Functions.      (line  49)
-* gawk, PROCINFO array in <2>:           Two-way I/O.         (line 114)
-* gawk, regexp constants and:            Standard Regexp Constants.
-                                                              (line  28)
-* gawk, regular expressions, case sensitivity: Case-sensitivity.
-                                                              (line  26)
-* gawk, regular expressions, operators:  GNU Regexp Operators.
-                                                              (line   6)
-* gawk, regular expressions, precedence: Regexp Operator Details.
-                                                              (line 142)
-* gawk, RT variable in:                  awk split records.   (line 131)
-* gawk, RT variable in <1>:              gawk split records.  (line  58)
-* gawk, RT variable in <2>:              Multiple Line.       (line 139)
-* gawk, RT variable in <3>:              Auto-set.            (line 348)
-* gawk, See Also awk:                    Preface.             (line  34)
+* gawk, installing:                      Installation.        (line   6)
 * gawk, source code, obtaining:          Getting.             (line   6)
-* gawk, splitting fields and:            Testing field creation.
+* gawk, distribution:                    Distribution contents.
                                                               (line   6)
-* gawk, string-translation functions:    I18N Functions.      (line   6)
-* gawk, SYMTAB array in:                 Auto-set.            (line 352)
-* gawk, TEXTDOMAIN variable in:          User-modified.       (line 155)
-* gawk, timestamps:                      Time Functions.      (line   6)
-* gawk, uses for:                        Preface.             (line  34)
-* gawk, versions of, information about, printing: Options.    (line 331)
+* gawk, configuring, options:            Additional Configuration Options.
+                                                              (line   6)
+* gawk, configuring:                     Configuration Philosophy.
+                                                              (line   6)
+* gawk, MS-Windows version of:           PC Using.            (line  13)
 * gawk, VMS version of:                  VMS Installation.    (line   6)
-* gawk, word-boundary operator:          GNU Regexp Operators.
-                                                              (line  66)
-* gawkextlib:                            gawkextlib.          (line   6)
+* gawk, implementation issues:           Notes.               (line   6)
+* gawk, implementation issues, downward compatibility: Compatibility Mode.
+                                                              (line   6)
+* gawk, implementation issues, debugging: Compatibility Mode. (line   6)
+* gawk, features, adding:                Adding Code.         (line   6)
+* gawk, coding style in:                 Adding Code.         (line  37)
+* gawk <1>:                              Preface.             (line  34)
 * gawkextlib project:                    gawkextlib.          (line   6)
 * gawklibpath_append shell function:     Shell Startup Files. (line  29)
 * gawklibpath_default shell function:    Shell Startup Files. (line  22)
@@ -35406,8 +35478,9 @@ Index
 * gawkpath_append shell function:        Shell Startup Files. (line  19)
 * gawkpath_default shell function:       Shell Startup Files. (line  12)
 * gawkpath_prepend shell function:       Shell Startup Files. (line  15)
-* General Public License (GPL):          Glossary.            (line 394)
-* General Public License, See GPL:       Manual History.      (line  11)
+* GAWK_LOCALE_DIR environment variable:  Explaining gettext.  (line 132)
+* GAWK_READ_TIMEOUT environment variable: Read Timeout.       (line  71)
+* GAWK_SOCK_RETRIES environment variable: Nonfatal.           (line  53)
 * generate time values:                  Time Functions.      (line  25)
 * gensub:                                Standard Regexp Constants.
                                                               (line  43)
@@ -35423,24 +35496,24 @@ Index
 * getgrnam() function (C library):       Group Functions.     (line 173)
 * getgrnam() user-defined function:      Group Functions.     (line 178)
 * getgruser() function (C library):      Group Functions.     (line 193)
-* getgruser() function, user-defined:    Group Functions.     (line 196)
+* getgruser() user-defined function:     Group Functions.     (line 196)
 * getline command:                       Reading Files.       (line  20)
+* getline command, explicit input with:  Getline.             (line   6)
+* getline command, return values:        Getline.             (line  19)
+* getline command, into a variable:      Getline/Variable.    (line   6)
+* getline command, from a file:          Getline/File.        (line   6)
 * getline command, coprocesses, using from: Getline/Coprocess.
                                                               (line   6)
-* getline command, coprocesses, using from <1>: Close Files And Pipes.
-                                                              (line   6)
-* getline command, deadlock and:         Two-way I/O.         (line  53)
-* getline command, explicit input with:  Getline.             (line   6)
 * getline command, FILENAME variable and: Getline Notes.      (line  19)
-* getline command, return values:        Getline.             (line  19)
 * getline command, variants:             Getline Summary.     (line   6)
+* getline command, coprocesses, using from <1>: Close Files And Pipes.
+                                                              (line   6)
+* getline command, BEGINFILE/ENDFILE patterns and: BEGINFILE/ENDFILE.
+                                                              (line  54)
+* getline command, _pw_init() function:  Passwd Functions.    (line 154)
 * getline command, _gr_init() user-defined function: Group Functions.
                                                               (line  83)
-* getline command, _pw_init() function:  Passwd Functions.    (line 154)
-* getline from a file:                   Getline/File.        (line   6)
-* getline into a variable:               Getline/Variable.    (line   6)
-* getline statement, BEGINFILE/ENDFILE patterns and: BEGINFILE/ENDFILE.
-                                                              (line  54)
+* getline command, deadlock and:         Two-way I/O.         (line  53)
 * getlocaltime() user-defined function:  Getlocaltime Function.
                                                               (line  16)
 * getopt() function (C library):         Getopt Function.     (line  15)
@@ -35465,11 +35538,11 @@ Index
                                                               (line  10)
 * git utility <3>:                       Adding Code.         (line 112)
 * Git, use of for gawk source code:      Derived Files.       (line   6)
+* global variables, show in debugger:    Debugger Info.       (line  48)
 * GNITS mailing list:                    Acknowledgments.     (line  52)
-* GNU awk, See gawk:                     Preface.             (line  51)
+* GNU awk:                               Preface.             (line  51)
 * GNU Free Documentation License:        GNU Free Documentation License.
                                                               (line   8)
-* GNU General Public License:            Glossary.            (line 394)
 * GNU Lesser General Public License:     Glossary.            (line 489)
 * GNU long options:                      Command Line.        (line  13)
 * GNU long options <1>:                  Options.             (line   6)
@@ -35483,8 +35556,8 @@ Index
 * goawk:                                 Other Versions.      (line 113)
 * Gordon, Assaf:                         Contributors.        (line 108)
 * GPL (General Public License):          Manual History.      (line  11)
-* GPL (General Public License) <1>:      Glossary.            (line 394)
 * GPL (General Public License), printing: Options.            (line  93)
+* GPL (General Public License) <1>:      Glossary.            (line 394)
 * grcat program:                         Group Functions.     (line  16)
 * Grigera, Juan:                         Contributors.        (line  58)
 * group database, reading:               Group Functions.     (line   6)
@@ -35504,8 +35577,8 @@ Index
 * Hankerson, Darrel:                     Acknowledgments.     (line  60)
 * Hankerson, Darrel <1>:                 Contributors.        (line  61)
 * Haque, John:                           Contributors.        (line 111)
-* Hartholz, Elaine:                      Acknowledgments.     (line  38)
 * Hartholz, Marshall:                    Acknowledgments.     (line  38)
+* Hartholz, Elaine:                      Acknowledgments.     (line  38)
 * Hasegawa, Isamu:                       Contributors.        (line  97)
 * help debugger command:                 Miscellaneous Debugger Commands.
                                                               (line  67)
@@ -35515,49 +35588,50 @@ Index
 * histsort.awk program:                  History Sorting.     (line  25)
 * Hughes, Phil:                          Acknowledgments.     (line  43)
 * HUP signal, for dynamic profiling:     Profiling.           (line 211)
-* hyphen (-), - operator:                Precedence.          (line  51)
-* hyphen (-), - operator <1>:            Precedence.          (line  57)
+* hyphen (-), file names beginning with: Options.             (line  64)
+* hyphen (-), -- end of options marker:  Options.             (line 336)
+* hyphen (-), in bracket expressions:    Bracket Expressions. (line  25)
+* hyphen (-), -= operator:               Assignment Ops.      (line 129)
 * hyphen (-), -- operator:               Increment Ops.       (line  48)
 * hyphen (-), -- operator <1>:           Precedence.          (line  45)
-* hyphen (-), -= operator:               Assignment Ops.      (line 129)
+* hyphen (-), - operator:                Precedence.          (line  51)
+* hyphen (-), - operator <1>:            Precedence.          (line  57)
 * hyphen (-), -= operator <1>:           Precedence.          (line  94)
-* hyphen (-), file names beginning with: Options.             (line  64)
-* hyphen (-), in bracket expressions:    Bracket Expressions. (line  25)
 * i debugger command (alias for info):   Debugger Info.       (line  13)
 * id utility:                            Id Program.          (line   6)
 * id.awk program:                        Id Program.          (line  31)
-* if statement:                          If Statement.        (line   6)
-* if statement, actions, changing:       Ranges.              (line  25)
 * if statement, use of regexps in:       Regexp Usage.        (line  19)
+* if statement, actions, changing:       Ranges.              (line  25)
+* if statement:                          If Statement.        (line   6)
 * igawk.sh program:                      Igawk Program.       (line 124)
 * ignore breakpoint:                     Breakpoint Control.  (line  87)
 * ignore debugger command:               Breakpoint Control.  (line  87)
+* IGNORECASE variable, with ~ and !~ operators: Case-sensitivity.
+                                                              (line  26)
 * IGNORECASE variable:                   User-modified.       (line  79)
 * IGNORECASE variable, array indices and: Array Intro.        (line 100)
-* IGNORECASE variable, array sorting functions and: Array Sorting Functions.
-                                                              (line  83)
 * IGNORECASE variable, in example programs: Library Functions.
                                                               (line  53)
-* IGNORECASE variable, with ~ and !~ operators: Case-sensitivity.
-                                                              (line  26)
-* Illumos:                               Other Versions.      (line 105)
+* IGNORECASE variable, array sorting functions and: Array Sorting Functions.
+                                                              (line  83)
 * Illumos, POSIX-compliant awk:          Other Versions.      (line 105)
-* implementation issues, gawk:           Notes.               (line   6)
-* implementation issues, gawk, debugging: Compatibility Mode. (line   6)
 * implementation issues, gawk, limits:   Getline Notes.       (line  14)
 * implementation issues, gawk, limits <1>: Redirection.       (line 129)
+* implementation issues, gawk:           Notes.               (line   6)
+* implementation issues, gawk, debugging: Compatibility Mode. (line   6)
 * implicit namespace:                    Changing The Namespace.
                                                               (line  25)
 * in operator:                           Comparison Operators.
                                                               (line  11)
 * in operator <1>:                       Precedence.          (line  82)
 * in operator <2>:                       For Statement.       (line  75)
-* in operator, index existence in multidimensional arrays: Multidimensional.
-                                                              (line  41)
-* in operator, order of array access:    Scanning an Array.   (line  48)
 * in operator, testing if array element exists: Reference to Elements.
                                                               (line  38)
 * in operator, use in loops:             Scanning an Array.   (line  17)
+* in operator, order of array access:    Scanning an Array.   (line  48)
+* in operator, index existence in multidimensional arrays: Multidimensional.
+                                                              (line  41)
+* @include directive:                    Include Files.       (line   8)
 * including files, @include directive:   Include Files.       (line   8)
 * increment operators:                   Increment Ops.       (line   6)
 * index:                                 String Functions.    (line 156)
@@ -35570,52 +35644,59 @@ Index
 * initialization, automatic:             More Complex.        (line  39)
 * inplace extension:                     Extension Sample Inplace.
                                                               (line   6)
+* input, standard:                       Read Terminal.       (line   6)
+* input, splitting into records:         Records.             (line   6)
+* input, multiline records:              Multiple Line.       (line   6)
+* input, explicit:                       Getline.             (line   6)
+* input, standard <1>:                   Special FD.          (line   6)
+* input, data, nondecimal:               Nondecimal Data.     (line   6)
+* input files, running awk without:      Read Terminal.       (line   6)
+* input files, running awk without <1>:  Read Terminal.       (line  16)
+* input files, examples:                 Sample Data Files.   (line   6)
+* input files, variable assignments and: Other Arguments.     (line  32)
+* input files, reading:                  Reading Files.       (line   6)
 * input files:                           Reading Files.       (line   6)
 * input files, closing:                  Close Files And Pipes.
                                                               (line   6)
 * input files, counting elements in:     Wc Program.          (line   6)
-* input files, examples:                 Sample Data Files.   (line   6)
-* input files, reading:                  Reading Files.       (line   6)
-* input files, running awk without:      Read Terminal.       (line   6)
-* input files, running awk without <1>:  Read Terminal.       (line  16)
-* input files, variable assignments and: Other Arguments.     (line  32)
 * input pipeline:                        Getline/Pipe.        (line  10)
 * input record, length of:               String Functions.    (line 178)
 * input redirection:                     Getline/File.        (line   6)
-* input, data, nondecimal:               Nondecimal Data.     (line   6)
-* input, explicit:                       Getline.             (line   6)
-* input, files, See input files:         Multiple Line.       (line   6)
-* input, multiline records:              Multiple Line.       (line   6)
-* input, splitting into records:         Records.             (line   6)
-* input, standard:                       Read Terminal.       (line   6)
-* input, standard <1>:                   Special FD.          (line   6)
-* input/output functions:                I/O Functions.       (line   6)
-* input/output, binary:                  User-modified.       (line  15)
 * input/output, from BEGIN and END:      I/O And BEGIN/END.   (line   6)
+* input/output, binary:                  User-modified.       (line  15)
+* input/output, functions:               I/O Functions.       (line   6)
 * input/output, two-way:                 Two-way I/O.         (line  27)
 * insomnia, cure for:                    Alarm Program.       (line   6)
-* installation, VMS:                     VMS Installation.    (line   6)
 * installing gawk:                       Installation.        (line   6)
+* installing gawk, MS-Windows:           PC Binary Installation.
+                                                              (line   6)
+* installing gawk, Cygwin:               Cygwin.              (line  21)
+* installing gawk, VMS:                  VMS Installation.    (line   6)
 * instruction tracing, in debugger:      Debugger Info.       (line  90)
 * int:                                   Numeric Functions.   (line  24)
 * INT signal (MS-Windows):               Profiling.           (line 214)
 * integer array indices:                 Numeric Array Subscripts.
                                                               (line  31)
+* integers, unsigned:                    Computer Arithmetic. (line  41)
 * integers, arbitrary precision:         Arbitrary Precision Integers.
                                                               (line   6)
-* integers, unsigned:                    Computer Arithmetic. (line  41)
 * interacting with other programs:       I/O Functions.       (line 106)
-* internationalization:                  I18N Functions.      (line   6)
-* internationalization <1>:              I18N and L10N.       (line   6)
+* internationalization, localization, character classes: Bracket Expressions.
+                                                              (line 112)
 * internationalization, localization:    User-modified.       (line 155)
+* internationalization:                  I18N Functions.      (line   6)
 * internationalization, localization <1>: Internationalization.
                                                               (line  13)
-* internationalization, localization, character classes: Bracket Expressions.
-                                                              (line 112)
 * internationalization, localization, gawk and: Internationalization.
                                                               (line  13)
+* internationalization <1>:              I18N and L10N.       (line   6)
+* internationalization, localization <2>: I18N and L10N.      (line   6)
 * internationalization, localization, locale categories: Explaining gettext.
                                                               (line  81)
+* internationalization, localization, monetary information: Explaining gettext.
+                                                              (line 104)
+* internationalization, localization, currency symbols: Explaining gettext.
+                                                              (line 104)
 * internationalization, localization, marked strings: Programmer i18n.
                                                               (line  13)
 * internationalization, localization, portability and: I18N Portability.
@@ -35628,9 +35709,10 @@ Index
 * inventory-shipped file:                Sample Data Files.   (line  32)
 * invoke shell command:                  I/O Functions.       (line 106)
 * isarray:                               Type Functions.      (line  11)
+* ISO, ISO 8601 date and time standard:  Time Functions.      (line 186)
+* ISO, ISO 8859-1 character set:         Glossary.            (line 194)
+* ISO, ISO Latin-1 character set:        Glossary.            (line 194)
 * ISO:                                   Glossary.            (line 454)
-* ISO 8859-1:                            Glossary.            (line 194)
-* ISO Latin-1:                           Glossary.            (line 194)
 * Jacobs, Andrew:                        Passwd Functions.    (line  90)
 * Jaegermann, Michal:                    Acknowledgments.     (line  60)
 * Jaegermann, Michal <1>:                Contributors.        (line  46)
@@ -35640,8 +35722,8 @@ Index
 * jedi knights:                          Undocumented.        (line   6)
 * Johansen, Chris:                       Signature Program.   (line  25)
 * join() user-defined function:          Join Function.       (line  18)
-* Kahrs, Ju"rgen:                        Acknowledgments.     (line  60)
-* Kahrs, Ju"rgen <1>:                    Contributors.        (line  71)
+* Kahrs, Jürgen:                         Acknowledgments.     (line  60)
+* Kahrs, Jürgen <1>:                     Contributors.        (line  71)
 * Kasal, Stepan:                         Acknowledgments.     (line  60)
 * Kenobi, Obi-Wan:                       Undocumented.        (line   6)
 * Kernighan, Brian:                      History.             (line  17)
@@ -35661,26 +35743,29 @@ Index
 * l debugger command (alias for list):   Miscellaneous Debugger Commands.
                                                               (line  73)
 * labels.awk program:                    Labels Program.      (line  51)
+* LANG environment variable:             I18N Example.        (line  68)
 * Langston, Peter:                       Advanced Features.   (line   6)
 * LANGUAGE environment variable:         Explaining gettext.  (line 120)
+* LANGUAGE environment variable <1>:     I18N Example.        (line  68)
 * languages, data-driven:                Basic High Level.    (line  74)
+* LC_ALL environment variable:           I18N Example.        (line  68)
 * LC_ALL locale category:                Explaining gettext.  (line 117)
 * LC_COLLATE locale category:            Explaining gettext.  (line  94)
 * LC_CTYPE locale category:              Explaining gettext.  (line  98)
+* LC_MESSAGES environment variable:      I18N Example.        (line  68)
 * LC_MESSAGES locale category:           Explaining gettext.  (line  88)
 * LC_MESSAGES locale category, bindtextdomain() function (gawk): Programmer 
i18n.
                                                               (line 103)
 * LC_MONETARY locale category:           Explaining gettext.  (line 104)
 * LC_NUMERIC locale category:            Explaining gettext.  (line 108)
 * LC_TIME locale category:               Explaining gettext.  (line 112)
+* left angle bracket (<), < operator (I/O): Getline/File.     (line   6)
 * left angle bracket (<), < operator:    Comparison Operators.
                                                               (line  11)
-* left angle bracket (<), < operator <1>: Precedence.         (line  64)
-* left angle bracket (<), < operator (I/O): Getline/File.     (line   6)
 * left angle bracket (<), <= operator:   Comparison Operators.
                                                               (line  11)
+* left angle bracket (<), < operator <1>: Precedence.         (line  64)
 * left angle bracket (<), <= operator <1>: Precedence.        (line  64)
-* left shift:                            Bitwise Functions.   (line  47)
 * left shift, bitwise:                   Bitwise Functions.   (line  32)
 * leftmost longest match:                Multiple Line.       (line  26)
 * length:                                String Functions.    (line 171)
@@ -35690,81 +35775,77 @@ Index
 * LGPL (Lesser General Public License):  Glossary.            (line 489)
 * libmawk:                               Other Versions.      (line 129)
 * libraries of awk functions:            Library Functions.   (line   6)
-* libraries of awk functions, assertions: Assert Function.    (line   6)
 * libraries of awk functions, associative arrays and: Library Names.
                                                               (line  58)
-* libraries of awk functions, character values as numbers: Ordinal Functions.
+* libraries of awk functions, assertions: Assert Function.    (line   6)
+* libraries of awk functions, rounding numbers: Round Function.
                                                               (line   6)
-* libraries of awk functions, command-line options: Getopt Function.
+* libraries of awk functions, character values as numbers: Ordinal Functions.
                                                               (line   6)
-* libraries of awk functions, example program for using: Igawk Program.
+* libraries of awk functions, merging arrays into strings: Join Function.
                                                               (line   6)
-* libraries of awk functions, group database, reading: Group Functions.
+* libraries of awk functions, managing, time: Getlocaltime Function.
                                                               (line   6)
 * libraries of awk functions, managing, data files: Data File Management.
                                                               (line   6)
-* libraries of awk functions, managing, time: Getlocaltime Function.
+* libraries of awk functions, command-line options: Getopt Function.
                                                               (line   6)
-* libraries of awk functions, merging arrays into strings: Join Function.
+* libraries of awk functions, user database, reading: Passwd Functions.
                                                               (line   6)
-* libraries of awk functions, rounding numbers: Round Function.
+* libraries of awk functions, group database, reading: Group Functions.
                                                               (line   6)
-* libraries of awk functions, user database, reading: Passwd Functions.
+* libraries of awk functions, example program for using: Igawk Program.
                                                               (line   6)
 * line breaks:                           Statements/Lines.    (line   6)
+* line continuations, with C shell:      More Complex.        (line  31)
+* line continuations, in print statement: Print Examples.     (line  75)
 * line continuations:                    Boolean Ops.         (line  64)
 * line continuations, gawk:              Conditional Exp.     (line  34)
-* line continuations, in print statement: Print Examples.     (line  75)
-* line continuations, with C shell:      More Complex.        (line  31)
 * lines, blank, printing:                Print.               (line  22)
-* lines, counting:                       Wc Program.          (line   6)
-* lines, duplicate, removing:            History Sorting.     (line   6)
 * lines, matching ranges of:             Ranges.              (line   6)
 * lines, skipping between markers:       Ranges.              (line  43)
-* lint checking:                         User-modified.       (line  90)
-* lint checking, array elements:         Delete.              (line  34)
-* lint checking, array subscripts:       Uninitialized Subscripts.
-                                                              (line  43)
+* lines, counting:                       Wc Program.          (line   6)
+* lines, duplicate, removing:            History Sorting.     (line   6)
 * lint checking, empty programs:         Command Line.        (line  16)
 * lint checking, issuing warnings:       Options.             (line 210)
 * lint checking, POSIXLY_CORRECT environment variable: Options.
-                                                              (line 373)
+                                                              (line 377)
+* lint checking:                         User-modified.       (line  90)
+* lint checking, array subscripts:       Uninitialized Subscripts.
+                                                              (line  43)
+* lint checking, array subscripts <1>:   Delete.              (line  34)
 * lint checking, undefined functions:    Function Caveats.    (line  23)
 * LINT variable:                         User-modified.       (line  90)
-* Linux:                                 Manual History.      (line  28)
-* Linux <1>:                             I18N Example.        (line  57)
-* Linux <2>:                             Glossary.            (line 746)
 * list all global variables, in debugger: Debugger Info.      (line  48)
 * list debugger command:                 Miscellaneous Debugger Commands.
                                                               (line  73)
 * list function definitions, in debugger: Debugger Info.      (line  30)
+* @load directive:                       Loading Shared Libraries.
+                                                              (line   8)
+* loading extensions:                    Options.             (line 198)
 * loading extensions, @load directive:   Loading Shared Libraries.
                                                               (line   8)
-* loading, extensions:                   Options.             (line 198)
 * local variables, in a function:        Variable Scope.      (line   6)
+* local variables, show in debugger:     Debugger Info.       (line  34)
 * locale categories:                     Explaining gettext.  (line  81)
 * locale decimal point character:        Options.             (line 295)
 * locale, definition of:                 Locales.             (line   6)
-* localization:                          I18N and L10N.       (line   6)
-* localization, See internationalization, localization: I18N and L10N.
-                                                              (line   6)
 * log:                                   Numeric Functions.   (line  29)
 * log files, timestamps in:              Time Functions.      (line   6)
 * logarithm:                             Numeric Functions.   (line  29)
 * logical false/true:                    Truth Values.        (line   6)
-* logical operators, See Boolean expressions: Boolean Ops.    (line   6)
 * login information:                     Passwd Functions.    (line  16)
 * long options:                          Command Line.        (line  13)
 * loops:                                 While Statement.     (line   6)
-* loops, break statement and:            Break Statement.     (line   6)
-* loops, continue statements and:        For Statement.       (line  64)
-* loops, count for header, in a profile: Profiling.           (line 131)
+* loops, while:                          While Statement.     (line   6)
 * loops, do-while:                       Do Statement.        (line   6)
+* loops, for, iterative:                 For Statement.       (line   6)
+* loops, continue statement and:         For Statement.       (line  64)
 * loops, exiting:                        Break Statement.     (line   6)
+* loops, break statement and:            Break Statement.     (line   6)
 * loops, for, array scanning:            Scanning an Array.   (line   6)
-* loops, for, iterative:                 For Statement.       (line   6)
-* loops, See Also while statement:       While Statement.     (line   6)
-* loops, while:                          While Statement.     (line   6)
+* loops, count for header, in a profile: Profiling.           (line 131)
+* loops <1>:                             While Statement.     (line   6)
 * ls utility:                            More Complex.        (line  15)
 * lshift:                                Bitwise Functions.   (line  47)
 * lvalues/rvalues:                       Assignment Ops.      (line  31)
@@ -35782,9 +35863,10 @@ Index
 * match regexp in string:                String Functions.    (line 211)
 * match() function, RSTART/RLENGTH variables: String Functions.
                                                               (line 228)
-* matching, expressions, See comparison expressions: Typing and Comparison.
-                                                              (line   9)
+* match() function, side effects:        String Functions.    (line 228)
 * matching, leftmost longest:            Multiple Line.       (line  26)
+* matching, expressions:                 Typing and Comparison.
+                                                              (line   9)
 * matching, null strings:                String Functions.    (line 542)
 * mawk utility:                          Escape Sequences.    (line 121)
 * mawk utility <1>:                      Getline/Pipe.        (line  62)
@@ -35793,26 +35875,25 @@ Index
 * mawk utility <4>:                      Other Versions.      (line  39)
 * maximum precision supported by MPFR library: Auto-set.      (line 276)
 * McIlroy, Doug:                         Glossary.            (line 255)
-* McPhee, Patrick:                       Contributors.        (line 103)
+* McPhee, Patrick T.J.:                  Contributors.        (line 103)
 * memory, allocating for extensions:     Memory Allocation Functions.
                                                               (line   6)
 * message object files:                  Explaining gettext.  (line  42)
-* message object files, converting from portable object files: I18N Example.
-                                                              (line  80)
 * message object files, specifying directory of: Explaining gettext.
                                                               (line  54)
 * message object files, specifying directory of <1>: Programmer i18n.
                                                               (line  48)
+* message object files, converting from portable object files: I18N Example.
+                                                              (line  80)
 * messages from extensions:              Printing Messages.   (line   6)
-* metacharacters in regular expressions: Regexp Operators.    (line   6)
 * metacharacters, escape sequences for:  Escape Sequences.    (line 140)
+* metacharacters, in regular expressions: Regexp Operators.   (line   6)
 * minimum precision required by MPFR library: Auto-set.       (line 279)
 * mktime:                                Time Functions.      (line  25)
 * modifiers, in format specifiers:       Format Modifiers.    (line   6)
 * module, definition of:                 Global Namespace.    (line  18)
 * monetary information, localization:    Explaining gettext.  (line 104)
 * Moore, Duncan:                         Getline Notes.       (line  40)
-* MPFR, checking availability of:        Checking for MPFR.   (line   6)
 * MPFR, checking for:                    Checking for MPFR.   (line   6)
 * msgfmt utility:                        I18N Example.        (line  80)
 * multiple precision:                    Arbitrary Precision Arithmetic.
@@ -35822,45 +35903,49 @@ Index
                                                               (line  43)
 * name management:                       Internal Name Management.
                                                               (line   6)
-* names, arrays/variables:               Library Names.       (line   6)
 * names, functions:                      Definition Syntax.   (line  24)
+* names, arrays/variables:               Library Names.       (line   6)
 * names, functions <1>:                  Library Names.       (line   6)
-* namespace issues:                      Library Names.       (line   6)
-* namespace issues, functions:           Definition Syntax.   (line  24)
-* namespace names, naming rules:         Naming Rules.        (line   6)
-* namespace, awk:                        Default Namespace.   (line   6)
-* namespace, default:                    Default Namespace.   (line   6)
 * namespace, definition of:              Global Namespace.    (line   6)
-* namespace, example code:               Namespace Example.   (line   6)
+* namespace, standard awk, global:       Global Namespace.    (line   6)
+* namespace, default:                    Default Namespace.   (line   6)
+* namespace, awk:                        Default Namespace.   (line   6)
 * namespace, implicit:                   Changing The Namespace.
                                                               (line  25)
 * namespace, pushing and popping:        Changing The Namespace.
                                                               (line  29)
-* namespace, standard awk, global:       Global Namespace.    (line   6)
-* namespaces, backwards compatibility:   Namespace Summary.   (line  28)
+* namespace, example code:               Namespace Example.   (line   6)
+* @namespace directive:                  Changing The Namespace.
+                                                              (line   6)
+* @namespace directive <1>:              Changing The Namespace.
+                                                              (line  37)
+* namespaces, qualified names:           Qualified Names.     (line   6)
 * namespaces, changing:                  Changing The Namespace.
                                                               (line   6)
-* namespaces, interaction with debugger: Namespace And Features.
-                                                              (line  17)
-* namespaces, interaction with extension API: Namespace And Features.
-                                                              (line  22)
-* namespaces, interaction with pretty printer: Namespace And Features.
+* namespaces, naming rules:              Naming Rules.        (line   6)
+* namespaces, interaction with, profiler: Namespace And Features.
                                                               (line   9)
-* namespaces, interaction with profiler: Namespace And Features.
+* namespaces, interaction with, pretty printer: Namespace And Features.
                                                               (line   9)
-* namespaces, qualified names:           Qualified Names.     (line   6)
-* naming rules, namespaces and component names: Naming Rules. (line   6)
+* namespaces, interaction with, debugger: Namespace And Features.
+                                                              (line  17)
+* namespaces, interaction with, extension API: Namespace And Features.
+                                                              (line  22)
+* namespaces, backwards compatibility:   Namespace Summary.   (line  28)
+* naming issues, functions:              Definition Syntax.   (line  24)
+* naming issues:                         Library Names.       (line   6)
+* naming rules, namespace and component names: Naming Rules.  (line   6)
 * Neacsu, Mircea:                        Other Versions.      (line 132)
 * NetBSD:                                Glossary.            (line 746)
-* networks, programming:                 TCP/IP Networking.   (line   6)
 * networks, support for:                 Special Network.     (line   6)
+* networks, programming:                 TCP/IP Networking.   (line   6)
 * newlines:                              Statements/Lines.    (line   6)
 * newlines <1>:                          Options.             (line 289)
-* newlines <2>:                          Boolean Ops.         (line  69)
-* newlines, as record separators:        awk split records.   (line  12)
 * newlines, in dynamic regexps:          Computed Regexps.    (line  60)
 * newlines, in regexp constants:         Computed Regexps.    (line  70)
+* newlines, as record separators:        awk split records.   (line  12)
 * newlines, printing:                    Print Examples.      (line  11)
+* newlines <2>:                          Boolean Ops.         (line  69)
 * newlines, separating statements in actions: Action Overview.
                                                               (line  19)
 * newlines, separating statements in actions <1>: Statements. (line  10)
@@ -35868,23 +35953,23 @@ Index
                                                               (line  43)
 * next file statement:                   Feature History.     (line 168)
 * next statement:                        Boolean Ops.         (line  95)
-* next statement <1>:                    Next Statement.      (line   6)
 * next statement, BEGIN/END patterns and: I/O And BEGIN/END.  (line  36)
 * next statement, BEGINFILE/ENDFILE patterns and: BEGINFILE/ENDFILE.
                                                               (line  50)
+* next statement <1>:                    Next Statement.      (line   6)
 * next statement, user-defined functions and: Next Statement. (line  44)
-* nextfile statement:                    Nextfile Statement.  (line   6)
 * nextfile statement, BEGIN/END patterns and: I/O And BEGIN/END.
                                                               (line  36)
 * nextfile statement, BEGINFILE/ENDFILE patterns and: BEGINFILE/ENDFILE.
                                                               (line  26)
+* nextfile statement:                    Nextfile Statement.  (line   6)
 * nextfile statement, user-defined functions and: Nextfile Statement.
                                                               (line  47)
 * nexti debugger command:                Debugger Execution Control.
                                                               (line  49)
 * NF variable:                           Fields.              (line  33)
-* NF variable <1>:                       Auto-set.            (line 123)
 * NF variable, decrementing:             Changing Fields.     (line 107)
+* NF variable <1>:                       Auto-set.            (line 123)
 * ni debugger command (alias for nexti): Debugger Execution Control.
                                                               (line  49)
 * noassign.awk program:                  Ignoring Assigns.    (line  15)
@@ -35894,97 +35979,94 @@ Index
 * NR variable:                           Records.             (line   6)
 * NR variable <1>:                       Auto-set.            (line 143)
 * NR variable, changing:                 Auto-set.            (line 409)
+* null strings, in gawk arguments, quoting and: Quoting.      (line  82)
 * null strings:                          awk split records.   (line 121)
 * null strings <1>:                      Regexp Field Splitting.
                                                               (line  43)
+* null strings, converting numbers to strings: Strings And Numbers.
+                                                              (line  21)
 * null strings <2>:                      Truth Values.        (line   6)
-* null strings <3>:                      Basic Data Typing.   (line  26)
-* null strings in gawk arguments, quoting and: Quoting.       (line  82)
 * null strings, as array subscripts:     Uninitialized Subscripts.
                                                               (line  43)
-* null strings, converting numbers to strings: Strings And Numbers.
-                                                              (line  21)
 * null strings, deleting array elements and: Delete.          (line  27)
 * null strings, matching:                String Functions.    (line 542)
+* null strings <3>:                      Basic Data Typing.   (line  26)
 * number of array elements:              String Functions.    (line 201)
 * number sign (#), #! (executable scripts): Executable Scripts.
                                                               (line   6)
 * number sign (#), commenting:           Comments.            (line   6)
+* numbers, octal:                        Nondecimal-numbers.  (line   6)
+* numbers, hexadecimal:                  Nondecimal-numbers.  (line   6)
+* numbers, converting:                   Strings And Numbers. (line   6)
+* numbers, converting, to strings:       User-modified.       (line  30)
+* numbers, converting, to strings <1>:   User-modified.       (line 107)
 * numbers, as array subscripts:          Numeric Array Subscripts.
                                                               (line   6)
+* numbers, converting <1>:               Bitwise Functions.   (line 109)
 * numbers, as string of bits:            Bitwise Functions.   (line 109)
-* numbers, as values of characters:      Ordinal Functions.   (line   6)
+* numbers, rounding:                     Round Function.      (line   6)
 * numbers, Cliff random:                 Cliff Random Function.
                                                               (line   6)
-* numbers, converting:                   Strings And Numbers. (line   6)
-* numbers, converting <1>:               Bitwise Functions.   (line 109)
-* numbers, converting, to strings:       User-modified.       (line  30)
-* numbers, converting, to strings <1>:   User-modified.       (line 107)
-* numbers, hexadecimal:                  Nondecimal-numbers.  (line   6)
-* numbers, octal:                        Nondecimal-numbers.  (line   6)
-* numbers, rounding:                     Round Function.      (line   6)
-* numeric constants:                     Scalar Constants.    (line   6)
-* numeric functions:                     Numeric Functions.   (line   6)
+* numbers, as values of characters:      Ordinal Functions.   (line   6)
 * numeric, output format:                OFMT.                (line   6)
+* numeric, constants:                    Scalar Constants.    (line   6)
 * numeric, strings:                      Variable Typing.     (line  67)
+* numeric, functions:                    Numeric Functions.   (line   6)
 * o debugger command (alias for option): Debugger Info.       (line  57)
 * obsolete features:                     Obsolete.            (line   6)
 * octal numbers:                         Nondecimal-numbers.  (line   6)
 * octal values, enabling interpretation of: Options.          (line 236)
 * OFMT variable:                         OFMT.                (line  15)
+* OFMT variable, POSIX awk and:          OFMT.                (line  27)
 * OFMT variable <1>:                     Strings And Numbers. (line  56)
 * OFMT variable <2>:                     User-modified.       (line 107)
-* OFMT variable, POSIX awk and:          OFMT.                (line  27)
 * OFS variable:                          Changing Fields.     (line  64)
 * OFS variable <1>:                      Output Separators.   (line   6)
 * OFS variable <2>:                      User-modified.       (line 116)
 * OpenBSD:                               Glossary.            (line 746)
 * OpenSolaris:                           Other Versions.      (line  96)
 * operating systems, BSD-based:          Manual History.      (line  28)
-* operating systems, PC, gawk on:        PC Using.            (line   6)
+* operating systems:                     Installation.        (line   6)
 * operating systems, PC, gawk on, installing: PC Installation.
                                                               (line   6)
+* operating systems, PC, gawk on:        PC Using.            (line   6)
 * operating systems, porting gawk to:    New Ports.           (line   6)
-* operating systems, See Also GNU/Linux, PC operating systems, Unix: 
Installation.
-                                                              (line   6)
 * operations, bitwise:                   Bitwise Functions.   (line   6)
-* operators, arithmetic:                 Arithmetic Ops.      (line   6)
-* operators, assignment:                 Assignment Ops.      (line   6)
-* operators, assignment <1>:             Assignment Ops.      (line  31)
-* operators, assignment, evaluation order: Assignment Ops.    (line 110)
-* operators, Boolean, See Boolean expressions: Boolean Ops.   (line   6)
-* operators, decrement/increment:        Increment Ops.       (line   6)
+* operators, string-matching:            Regexp Usage.        (line  19)
 * operators, GNU-specific:               GNU Regexp Operators.
                                                               (line   6)
+* operators, string-matching, for buffers: GNU Regexp Operators.
+                                                              (line  51)
+* operators, word-boundary (gawk):       GNU Regexp Operators.
+                                                              (line  66)
 * operators, input/output:               Getline/File.        (line   6)
 * operators, input/output <1>:           Getline/Pipe.        (line  10)
 * operators, input/output <2>:           Getline/Coprocess.   (line   6)
 * operators, input/output <3>:           Redirection.         (line  22)
 * operators, input/output <4>:           Redirection.         (line  96)
+* operators, arithmetic:                 Arithmetic Ops.      (line   6)
+* operators, string:                     Concatenation.       (line   9)
+* operators, assignment:                 Assignment Ops.      (line   6)
+* operators, assignment <1>:             Assignment Ops.      (line  31)
+* operators, assignment, evaluation order: Assignment Ops.    (line 110)
+* operators, decrement/increment:        Increment Ops.       (line   6)
+* operators, precedence of:              Increment Ops.       (line  60)
+* operators, comparison:                 Comparison Operators.
+                                                              (line   6)
+* operators, short-circuit:              Boolean Ops.         (line  59)
+* operators, precedence of <1>:          Precedence.          (line   6)
 * operators, input/output <5>:           Precedence.          (line  64)
 * operators, input/output <6>:           Precedence.          (line  64)
 * operators, input/output <7>:           Precedence.          (line  64)
-* operators, logical, See Boolean expressions: Boolean Ops.   (line   6)
-* operators, precedence:                 Precedence.          (line   6)
-* operators, precedence of:              Increment Ops.       (line  60)
-* operators, relational, See operators, comparison: Typing and Comparison.
-                                                              (line   9)
-* operators, short-circuit:              Boolean Ops.         (line  59)
-* operators, string:                     Concatenation.       (line   9)
-* operators, string-matching:            Regexp Usage.        (line  19)
-* operators, string-matching, for buffers: GNU Regexp Operators.
-                                                              (line  51)
-* operators, word-boundary (gawk):       GNU Regexp Operators.
-                                                              (line  66)
 * option debugger command:               Debugger Info.       (line  57)
-* options, command-line:                 Options.             (line   6)
-* options, command-line, end of:         Options.             (line  59)
 * options, command-line, invoking awk:   Command Line.        (line   6)
-* options, command-line, processing:     Getopt Function.     (line   6)
-* options, deprecated:                   Obsolete.            (line   6)
 * options, long:                         Command Line.        (line  13)
+* options, command-line:                 Options.             (line   6)
 * options, long <1>:                     Options.             (line   6)
+* options, command-line, end of:         Options.             (line  59)
 * options, printing list of:             Options.             (line 176)
+* options, deprecated:                   Obsolete.            (line   6)
+* options, command-line, processing:     Getopt Function.     (line   6)
 * or:                                    Bitwise Functions.   (line  50)
 * OR bitwise operation:                  Bitwise Functions.   (line   6)
 * or Boolean-logic operator:             Boolean Ops.         (line   6)
@@ -35994,255 +36076,269 @@ Index
 * order of evaluation, concatenation:    Concatenation.       (line  41)
 * ORS variable:                          Output Separators.   (line  20)
 * ORS variable <1>:                      User-modified.       (line 122)
-* output field separator, See OFS variable: Changing Fields.  (line  64)
-* output record separator, See ORS variable: Output Separators.
-                                                              (line  20)
-* output redirection:                    Redirection.         (line   6)
-* output wrapper:                        Output Wrappers.     (line   6)
-* output, buffering:                     I/O Functions.       (line  32)
-* output, buffering <1>:                 I/O Functions.       (line 168)
-* output, duplicating into files:        Tee Program.         (line   6)
-* output, files, closing:                Close Files And Pipes.
-                                                              (line   6)
+* output, records:                       Output Separators.   (line  20)
 * output, format specifier, OFMT:        OFMT.                (line  15)
 * output, formatted:                     Printf.              (line   6)
 * output, pipes:                         Redirection.         (line  57)
-* output, printing, See printing:        Printing.            (line   6)
-* output, records:                       Output Separators.   (line  20)
 * output, standard:                      Special FD.          (line   6)
+* output, files, closing:                Close Files And Pipes.
+                                                              (line   6)
+* output, buffering:                     I/O Functions.       (line  32)
+* output, buffering <1>:                 I/O Functions.       (line 168)
+* output, duplicating into files:        Tee Program.         (line   6)
+* output field separator:                Changing Fields.     (line  64)
+* output record separator:               Output Separators.   (line  20)
+* output redirection:                    Redirection.         (line   6)
+* output wrapper:                        Output Wrappers.     (line   6)
 * p debugger command (alias for print):  Viewing And Changing Data.
                                                               (line  39)
 * package, definition of:                Global Namespace.    (line  18)
 * Papadopoulos, Panos:                   Contributors.        (line 131)
 * parent process ID of gawk process:     Auto-set.            (line 251)
-* parentheses (), in a profile:          Profiling.           (line 146)
 * parentheses (), regexp operator:       Regexp Operator Details.
                                                               (line  77)
+* parentheses (), in a profile:          Profiling.           (line 146)
 * password file:                         Passwd Functions.    (line  16)
 * patsplit:                              String Functions.    (line 297)
-* patterns:                              Patterns and Actions.
-                                                              (line   6)
-* patterns, Boolean expressions as:      Expression Patterns. (line  39)
-* patterns, comparison expressions as:   Expression Patterns. (line  14)
-* patterns, counts, in a profile:        Profiling.           (line 118)
 * patterns, default:                     Very Simple.         (line  35)
-* patterns, empty:                       Empty.               (line   6)
+* patterns, regexp constants as:         Regexp Usage.        (line   6)
+* patterns:                              Patterns and Actions.
+                                                              (line   6)
+* patterns, types of:                    Pattern Overview.    (line  15)
+* patterns, regexp constants as <1>:     Regexp Patterns.     (line   6)
 * patterns, expressions as:              Expression Patterns. (line   6)
+* patterns, comparison expressions as:   Expression Patterns. (line  14)
+* patterns, regexp constants as <2>:     Expression Patterns. (line  34)
+* patterns, Boolean expressions as:      Expression Patterns. (line  39)
 * patterns, ranges in:                   Ranges.              (line   6)
-* patterns, regexp constants as:         Expression Patterns. (line  34)
-* patterns, regular expressions as:      Regexp Usage.        (line   6)
-* patterns, regular expressions as <1>:  Regexp Patterns.     (line   6)
-* patterns, types of:                    Pattern Overview.    (line  15)
+* patterns, empty:                       Empty.               (line   6)
+* patterns, counts, in a profile:        Profiling.           (line 118)
 * pawk (profiling version of Brian Kernighan's awk): Other Versions.
                                                               (line  78)
 * pawk, awk-like facilities for Python:  Other Versions.      (line 137)
-* PC operating systems, gawk on:         PC Using.            (line   6)
 * PC operating systems, gawk on, installing: PC Installation. (line   6)
-* percent sign (%), % operator:          Precedence.          (line  54)
+* PC operating systems, gawk on:         PC Using.            (line   6)
 * percent sign (%), %= operator:         Assignment Ops.      (line 129)
+* percent sign (%), % operator:          Precedence.          (line  54)
 * percent sign (%), %= operator <1>:     Precedence.          (line  94)
 * period (.), regexp operator:           Regexp Operator Details.
                                                               (line  40)
 * Perl:                                  Future Extensions.   (line   6)
 * Peters, Arno:                          Contributors.        (line  88)
 * Peterson, Hal:                         Contributors.        (line  40)
-* pipe, closing:                         Close Files And Pipes.
-                                                              (line   6)
 * pipe, input:                           Getline/Pipe.        (line  10)
 * pipe, output:                          Redirection.         (line  57)
+* pipe, closing:                         Close Files And Pipes.
+                                                              (line   6)
 * Pitts, Dave:                           Acknowledgments.     (line  60)
 * Pitts, Dave <1>:                       Maintainers.         (line  14)
 * platform running on:                   Auto-set.            (line 224)
 * Plauger, P.J.:                         Library Functions.   (line  12)
 * plug-in:                               Extension Intro.     (line   6)
-* plus sign (+), + operator:             Precedence.          (line  51)
-* plus sign (+), + operator <1>:         Precedence.          (line  57)
+* plus sign (+), regexp operator:        Regexp Operator Details.
+                                                              (line 107)
+* plus sign (+), += operator:            Assignment Ops.      (line  81)
 * plus sign (+), ++ operator:            Increment Ops.       (line  11)
 * plus sign (+), ++ operator <1>:        Increment Ops.       (line  40)
 * plus sign (+), ++ operator <2>:        Precedence.          (line  45)
-* plus sign (+), += operator:            Assignment Ops.      (line  81)
+* plus sign (+), + operator:             Precedence.          (line  51)
+* plus sign (+), + operator <1>:         Precedence.          (line  57)
 * plus sign (+), += operator <1>:        Precedence.          (line  94)
-* plus sign (+), regexp operator:        Regexp Operator Details.
-                                                              (line 107)
 * pointers to functions:                 Indirect Calls.      (line   6)
-* portability:                           Escape Sequences.    (line 103)
 * portability, #! (executable scripts):  Executable Scripts.  (line  33)
-* portability, ** operator and:          Arithmetic Ops.      (line  81)
-* portability, **= operator and:         Assignment Ops.      (line 144)
 * portability, ARGV variable:            Executable Scripts.  (line  59)
 * portability, backslash continuation and: Statements/Lines.  (line  30)
+* portability, POSIXLY_CORRECT environment variable: Options. (line 397)
+* portability:                           Escape Sequences.    (line 103)
 * portability, backslash in escape sequences: Escape Sequences.
                                                               (line 108)
-* portability, close() function and:     Close Files And Pipes.
-                                                              (line  81)
 * portability, data files as single record: gawk split records.
                                                               (line  65)
-* portability, deleting array elements:  Delete.              (line  56)
-* portability, example programs:         Library Functions.   (line  42)
-* portability, functions, defining:      Definition Syntax.   (line 114)
-* portability, gawk:                     New Ports.           (line   6)
-* portability, gettext library and:      Explaining gettext.  (line  11)
-* portability, internationalization and: I18N Portability.    (line   6)
-* portability, length() function:        String Functions.    (line 180)
-* portability, new awk vs. old awk:      Strings And Numbers. (line  56)
-* portability, next statement in user-defined functions: Function Caveats.
-                                                              (line  26)
 * portability, NF variable, decrementing: Changing Fields.    (line 115)
+* portability, close() function and:     Close Files And Pipes.
+                                                              (line  81)
+* portability, new awk vs. old awk:      Strings And Numbers. (line  56)
+* portability, ** operator and:          Arithmetic Ops.      (line  81)
+* portability, **= operator and:         Assignment Ops.      (line 144)
 * portability, operators:                Increment Ops.       (line  60)
 * portability, operators, not in POSIX awk: Precedence.       (line  97)
-* portability, POSIXLY_CORRECT environment variable: Options. (line 393)
+* portability, deleting array elements:  Delete.              (line  56)
+* portability, length() function:        String Functions.    (line 180)
 * portability, substr() function:        String Functions.    (line 518)
-* portable object files:                 Explaining gettext.  (line  37)
-* portable object files <1>:             Translator i18n.     (line   6)
-* portable object files, converting to message object files: I18N Example.
+* portability, functions, defining:      Definition Syntax.   (line 114)
+* portability, next statement in user-defined functions: Function Caveats.
+                                                              (line  26)
+* portability, example programs:         Library Functions.   (line  42)
+* portability, gettext library and:      Explaining gettext.  (line  11)
+* portability, internationalization and: I18N Portability.    (line   6)
+* portability, gawk:                     New Ports.           (line   6)
+* portable object, files, generating:    Options.             (line 169)
+* portable object, template files:       Explaining gettext.  (line  31)
+* portable object, files:                Explaining gettext.  (line  37)
+* portable object, files <1>:            Translator i18n.     (line   6)
+* portable object, files, converting to message object files: I18N Example.
                                                               (line  80)
-* portable object files, generating:     Options.             (line 169)
-* portable object template files:        Explaining gettext.  (line  31)
 * porting gawk:                          New Ports.           (line   6)
 * positional specifiers, printf statement: Format Modifiers.  (line  13)
 * positional specifiers, printf statement <1>: Printf Ordering.
                                                               (line   6)
 * positional specifiers, printf statement, mixing with regular formats: Printf 
Ordering.
                                                               (line  57)
+* POSIX, awk and:                        Preface.             (line  21)
+* POSIX, programs, implementing in awk:  Clones.              (line   6)
+* POSIX, gawk extensions not included in: POSIX/GNU.          (line   6)
 * POSIX awk:                             This Manual.         (line  14)
-* POSIX awk <1>:                         Assignment Ops.      (line 138)
-* POSIX awk, ** operator and:            Precedence.          (line  97)
-* POSIX awk, **= operator and:           Assignment Ops.      (line 144)
-* POSIX awk, < operator and:             Getline/File.        (line  26)
-* POSIX awk, arithmetic operators and:   Arithmetic Ops.      (line  30)
+* POSIX awk, GNU long options and:       Options.             (line  15)
 * POSIX awk, backslashes in string constants: Escape Sequences.
                                                               (line 108)
-* POSIX awk, BEGIN/END patterns:         I/O And BEGIN/END.   (line  15)
+* POSIX awk, period (.), using:          Regexp Operator Details.
+                                                              (line  47)
+* POSIX awk, regular expressions and:    Regexp Operator Details.
+                                                              (line 142)
+* POSIX awk, interval expressions in:    Interval Expressions.
+                                                              (line   6)
 * POSIX awk, bracket expressions and:    Bracket Expressions. (line  34)
 * POSIX awk, bracket expressions and, character classes: Bracket Expressions.
                                                               (line  40)
 * POSIX awk, bracket expressions and, character classes <1>: Bracket 
Expressions.
                                                               (line 112)
+* POSIX awk, field separators and:       Full Line Fields.    (line  16)
+* POSIX awk, < operator and:             Getline/File.        (line  26)
+* POSIX awk, | I/O operator and:         Getline/Pipe.        (line  56)
+* POSIX awk, OFMT variable and:          OFMT.                (line  27)
+* POSIX awk, printf format strings and:  Format Modifiers.    (line 157)
+* POSIX awk, OFMT variable and <1>:      Strings And Numbers. (line  56)
+* POSIX awk, arithmetic operators and:   Arithmetic Ops.      (line  30)
+* POSIX awk <1>:                         Assignment Ops.      (line 138)
+* POSIX awk, **= operator and:           Assignment Ops.      (line 144)
+* POSIX awk, numeric strings and:        Variable Typing.     (line  67)
+* POSIX awk, ** operator and:            Precedence.          (line  97)
+* POSIX awk, BEGIN/END patterns:         I/O And BEGIN/END.   (line  15)
 * POSIX awk, break statement and:        Break Statement.     (line  51)
-* POSIX awk, changes in awk versions:    POSIX.               (line   6)
 * POSIX awk, continue statement and:     Continue Statement.  (line  44)
+* POSIX awk, next/nextfile statements and: Next Statement.    (line  44)
 * POSIX awk, CONVFMT variable and:       User-modified.       (line  30)
-* POSIX awk, date utility and:           Time Functions.      (line 255)
-* POSIX awk, field separators and:       Full Line Fields.    (line  16)
-* POSIX awk, function keyword in:        Definition Syntax.   (line  99)
-* POSIX awk, functions and, gsub()/sub(): Gory Details.       (line  90)
 * POSIX awk, functions and, length():    String Functions.    (line 180)
-* POSIX awk, GNU long options and:       Options.             (line  15)
-* POSIX awk, interval expressions in:    Interval Expressions.
-                                                              (line   6)
-* POSIX awk, next/nextfile statements and: Next Statement.    (line  44)
-* POSIX awk, numeric strings and:        Variable Typing.     (line  67)
-* POSIX awk, OFMT variable and:          OFMT.                (line  27)
-* POSIX awk, OFMT variable and <1>:      Strings And Numbers. (line  56)
-* POSIX awk, period (.), using:          Regexp Operator Details.
-                                                              (line  47)
-* POSIX awk, printf format strings and:  Format Modifiers.    (line 157)
-* POSIX awk, regular expressions and:    Regexp Operator Details.
-                                                              (line 142)
+* POSIX awk, functions and, gsub()/sub(): Gory Details.       (line  90)
 * POSIX awk, timestamps and:             Time Functions.      (line   6)
-* POSIX awk, | I/O operator and:         Getline/Pipe.        (line  56)
+* POSIX awk, date utility and:           Time Functions.      (line 255)
+* POSIX awk, function keyword in:        Definition Syntax.   (line  99)
+* POSIX awk, changes in awk versions:    POSIX.               (line   6)
 * POSIX mode:                            Options.             (line 283)
-* POSIX mode <1>:                        Options.             (line 373)
-* POSIX, awk and:                        Preface.             (line  21)
-* POSIX, gawk extensions not included in: POSIX/GNU.          (line   6)
-* POSIX, programs, implementing in awk:  Clones.              (line   6)
-* POSIXLY_CORRECT environment variable:  Options.             (line 373)
+* POSIX mode <1>:                        Options.             (line 377)
+* POSIX mode <2>:                        Regexp Operator Details.
+                                                              (line  47)
+* POSIX mode <3>:                        Input Summary.       (line  69)
+* POSIX mode <4>:                        Special Caveats.     (line   9)
+* POSIX mode <5>:                        Close Files And Pipes.
+                                                              (line 164)
+* POSIX mode <6>:                        Scalar Constants.    (line  63)
+* POSIX mode <7>:                        Locale influences conversions.
+                                                              (line  41)
+* POSIX mode <8>:                        POSIX String Comparison.
+                                                              (line  12)
+* POSIX mode <9>:                        POSIX String Comparison.
+                                                              (line  34)
+* POSIX mode <10>:                       String Functions.    (line 385)
+* POSIX mode <11>:                       Controlling Array Traversal.
+                                                              (line 226)
+* POSIX mode <12>:                       POSIX Floating Point Problems.
+                                                              (line  83)
+* POSIX mode <13>:                       Feature History.     (line 313)
+* POSIXLY_CORRECT environment variable:  Options.             (line 377)
 * PREC variable:                         User-modified.       (line 127)
-* precedence:                            Increment Ops.       (line  60)
-* precedence <1>:                        Precedence.          (line   6)
 * precedence, regexp operators:          Regexp Operator Details.
                                                               (line 137)
-* predefined variables:                  Built-in Variables.  (line   6)
+* precedence:                            Increment Ops.       (line  60)
+* precedence <1>:                        Precedence.          (line   6)
 * predefined variables, -v option, setting with: Options.     (line  45)
-* predefined variables, conveying information: Auto-set.      (line   6)
+* predefined variables:                  Built-in Variables.  (line   6)
 * predefined variables, user-modifiable: User-modified.       (line   6)
+* predefined variables, conveying information: Auto-set.      (line   6)
 * pretty printer, interaction with namespaces: Namespace And Features.
                                                               (line   9)
 * pretty printing:                       Options.             (line 248)
 * pretty printing <1>:                   Profiling.           (line 222)
-* pretty-printing, profiling, difference with: Profiling.     (line 229)
+* pretty printing, profiling, difference with: Profiling.     (line 229)
 * print debugger command:                Viewing And Changing Data.
                                                               (line  39)
 * print statement:                       Printing.            (line  16)
-* print statement, BEGIN/END patterns and: I/O And BEGIN/END. (line  15)
 * print statement, commas, omitting:     Print Examples.      (line  30)
-* print statement, I/O operators in:     Precedence.          (line  70)
 * print statement, line continuations and: Print Examples.    (line  75)
+* print statement, I/O operators in:     Precedence.          (line  70)
+* print statement, BEGIN/END patterns and: I/O And BEGIN/END. (line  15)
 * print statement, OFMT variable and:    User-modified.       (line 116)
-* print statement, See Also redirection, of output: Redirection.
-                                                              (line  17)
 * print statement, sprintf() function and: Round Function.    (line   6)
 * print variables, in debugger:          Viewing And Changing Data.
                                                               (line  39)
 * printf debugger command:               Viewing And Changing Data.
                                                               (line  57)
 * printf statement:                      Printing.            (line  16)
-* printf statement <1>:                  Printf.              (line   6)
 * printf statement, columns, aligning:   Print Examples.      (line  69)
+* printf statement <1>:                  Printf.              (line   6)
+* printf statement, syntax of:           Basic Printf.        (line   6)
 * printf statement, format-control characters: Control Letters.
                                                               (line   6)
-* printf statement, I/O operators in:    Precedence.          (line  70)
 * printf statement, modifiers:           Format Modifiers.    (line   6)
 * printf statement, positional specifiers: Format Modifiers.  (line  13)
+* printf statement, I/O operators in:    Precedence.          (line  70)
+* printf statement, sprintf() function and: Round Function.   (line   6)
 * printf statement, positional specifiers <1>: Printf Ordering.
                                                               (line   6)
 * printf statement, positional specifiers, mixing with regular formats: Printf 
Ordering.
                                                               (line  57)
-* printf statement, See Also redirection, of output: Redirection.
-                                                              (line  17)
-* printf statement, sprintf() function and: Round Function.   (line   6)
-* printf statement, syntax of:           Basic Printf.        (line   6)
-* printing:                              Printing.            (line   6)
-* printing messages from extensions:     Printing Messages.   (line   6)
 * printing, list of options:             Options.             (line 176)
-* printing, mailing labels:              Labels Program.      (line   6)
-* printing, unduplicated lines of text:  Uniq Program.        (line   6)
+* printing:                              Printing.            (line   6)
 * printing, user information:            Id Program.          (line   6)
+* printing, unduplicated lines of text:  Uniq Program.        (line   6)
+* printing, mailing labels:              Labels Program.      (line   6)
+* printing, messages from extensions:    Printing Messages.   (line   6)
 * private variables:                     Library Names.       (line  11)
 * process group ID of gawk process:      Auto-set.            (line 245)
 * process ID of gawk process:            Auto-set.            (line 248)
 * processes, two-way communications with: Two-way I/O.        (line   6)
 * processing data:                       Basic High Level.    (line   6)
 * PROCINFO array:                        Auto-set.            (line 148)
+* PROCINFO array, platform running on:   Auto-set.            (line 224)
+* PROCINFO array, values of sorted_in:   Controlling Scanning.
+                                                              (line  26)
 * PROCINFO array <1>:                    Time Functions.      (line  49)
 * PROCINFO array <2>:                    Passwd Functions.    (line   6)
-* PROCINFO array, communications via ptys and: Two-way I/O.   (line 114)
-* PROCINFO array, group membership and:  Group Functions.     (line   6)
 * PROCINFO array, testing the field splitting: Passwd Functions.
                                                               (line 154)
+* PROCINFO array, group membership and:  Group Functions.     (line   6)
 * PROCINFO array, user and group ID numbers and: Id Program.  (line  15)
-* PROCINFO, values of sorted_in:         Controlling Scanning.
-                                                              (line  26)
+* PROCINFO array, communications via ptys and: Two-way I/O.   (line 114)
 * profiler, interaction with namespaces: Namespace And Features.
                                                               (line   9)
 * profiling awk programs:                Profiling.           (line   6)
 * profiling awk programs, dynamically:   Profiling.           (line 179)
-* profiling, pretty-printing, difference with: Profiling.     (line 229)
+* profiling, pretty printing, difference with: Profiling.     (line 229)
 * program identifiers:                   Auto-set.            (line 193)
 * program, definition of:                Getting Started.     (line  21)
-* programming conventions, --non-decimal-data option: Nondecimal Data.
-                                                              (line  35)
-* programming conventions, ARGC/ARGV variables: Auto-set.     (line  35)
+* programming, concepts:                 Basic Concepts.      (line   6)
+* programming, concepts <1>:             Basic Concepts.      (line   6)
+* programming, basic steps:              Basic High Level.    (line  18)
 * programming conventions, exit statement: Exit Statement.    (line  38)
-* programming conventions, function parameters: Return Statement.
-                                                              (line  44)
+* programming conventions, ARGC/ARGV variables: Auto-set.     (line  35)
 * programming conventions, functions, calling: Calling Built-in.
                                                               (line  10)
 * programming conventions, functions, writing: Definition Syntax.
                                                               (line  71)
-* programming conventions, gawk extensions: Internal File Ops.
-                                                              (line  45)
+* programming conventions, function parameters: Return Statement.
+                                                              (line  44)
 * programming conventions, private variable names: Library Names.
                                                               (line  23)
+* programming conventions, --non-decimal-data option: Nondecimal Data.
+                                                              (line  35)
+* programming conventions, gawk extensions: Internal File Ops.
+                                                              (line  45)
 * programming language, recipe for:      History.             (line   6)
-* programming languages, Ada:            Glossary.            (line  11)
 * programming languages, data-driven vs. procedural: Getting Started.
                                                               (line  12)
 * programming languages, Go:             Other Versions.      (line 113)
+* programming languages, Ada:            Glossary.            (line  11)
 * programming languages, Java:           Glossary.            (line 466)
-* programming, basic steps:              Basic High Level.    (line  18)
-* programming, concepts:                 Basic Concepts.      (line   6)
-* programming, concepts <1>:             Basic Concepts.      (line   6)
 * pwcat program:                         Passwd Functions.    (line  23)
 * q debugger command (alias for quit):   Miscellaneous Debugger Commands.
                                                               (line 100)
@@ -36250,17 +36346,17 @@ Index
 * qualified name, definition of:         Qualified Names.     (line   6)
 * qualified name, use of:                Qualified Names.     (line  17)
 * Quanstrom, Erik:                       Alarm Program.       (line   8)
-* question mark (?), ?: operator:        Precedence.          (line  91)
 * question mark (?), regexp operator:    Regexp Operator Details.
                                                               (line 113)
 * question mark (?), regexp operator <1>: GNU Regexp Operators.
                                                               (line  62)
+* question mark (?), ?: operator:        Precedence.          (line  91)
 * QuikTrim Awk:                          Other Versions.      (line 147)
 * quit debugger command:                 Miscellaneous Debugger Commands.
                                                               (line 100)
 * QUIT signal (MS-Windows):              Profiling.           (line 214)
-* quoting, for small awk programs:       Comments.            (line  27)
 * quoting, in gawk command lines:        Long.                (line  26)
+* quoting, for small awk programs:       Comments.            (line  27)
 * quoting, in gawk command lines, tricks for: Quoting.        (line  91)
 * r debugger command (alias for run):    Debugger Execution Control.
                                                               (line  62)
@@ -36268,11 +36364,11 @@ Index
 * Ramey, Chet:                           Acknowledgments.     (line  60)
 * Ramey, Chet <1>:                       General Data Types.  (line   6)
 * rand:                                  Numeric Functions.   (line  34)
-* random numbers, Cliff:                 Cliff Random Function.
-                                                              (line   6)
 * random numbers, rand()/srand() functions: Numeric Functions.
                                                               (line  34)
 * random numbers, seed of:               Numeric Functions.   (line  64)
+* random numbers, Cliff:                 Cliff Random Function.
+                                                              (line   6)
 * range expressions (regexps):           Bracket Expressions. (line   6)
 * range patterns:                        Ranges.              (line   6)
 * range patterns, line continuation and: Ranges.              (line  64)
@@ -36292,75 +36388,71 @@ Index
 * reading input files:                   Reading Files.       (line   6)
 * recipe for a programming language:     History.             (line   6)
 * record separators:                     awk split records.   (line   6)
-* record separators <1>:                 User-modified.       (line 136)
-* record separators, changing:           awk split records.   (line  85)
 * record separators, newlines as:        awk split records.   (line  12)
+* record separators, changing:           awk split records.   (line  85)
 * record separators, regular expressions as: awk split records.
                                                               (line 131)
 * record separators, with multiline records: Multiple Line.   (line  10)
+* record separators <1>:                 User-modified.       (line 136)
 * records:                               Reading Files.       (line  14)
-* records <1>:                           Basic High Level.    (line  62)
-* records, multiline:                    Multiple Line.       (line   6)
-* records, printing:                     Print.               (line  22)
 * records, splitting input into:         Records.             (line   6)
 * records, terminating:                  awk split records.   (line 131)
 * records, treating files as:            gawk split records.  (line  92)
+* records, multiline:                    Multiple Line.       (line   6)
+* records, printing:                     Print.               (line  22)
+* records <1>:                           Basic High Level.    (line  62)
 * recursive functions:                   Definition Syntax.   (line  89)
 * redirect gawk output, in debugger:     Debugger Info.       (line  73)
-* redirection of input:                  Getline/File.        (line   6)
-* redirection of output:                 Redirection.         (line   6)
-* redirection on VMS:                    VMS Running.         (line  64)
+* redirection, of input:                 Getline/File.        (line   6)
+* redirection, of output:                Redirection.         (line   6)
+* redirection, on VMS:                   VMS Running.         (line  64)
 * reference counting, sorting arrays:    Array Sorting Functions.
                                                               (line  77)
 * regexp:                                Regexp.              (line   6)
 * regexp constants:                      Regexp Usage.        (line  57)
+* regexp constants, slashes vs. quotes:  Computed Regexps.    (line  30)
+* regexp constants, vs. string constants: Computed Regexps.   (line  40)
 * regexp constants <1>:                  Regexp Constants.    (line   6)
+* regexp constants, in gawk:             Standard Regexp Constants.
+                                                              (line  28)
+* regexp constants, /=.../, /= operator and: Assignment Ops.  (line 149)
 * regexp constants <2>:                  Comparison Operators.
                                                               (line 103)
-* regexp constants, /=.../, /= operator and: Assignment Ops.  (line 149)
 * regexp constants, as patterns:         Expression Patterns. (line  34)
-* regexp constants, in gawk:             Standard Regexp Constants.
-                                                              (line  28)
-* regexp constants, slashes vs. quotes:  Computed Regexps.    (line  30)
-* regexp constants, vs. string constants: Computed Regexps.   (line  40)
-* register extension:                    Registration Functions.
+* register loadable extension:           Registration Functions.
                                                               (line   6)
+* regular expressions, interval expressions and: Options.     (line 304)
 * regular expressions:                   Regexp.              (line   6)
+* regular expressions, as patterns:      Regexp Usage.        (line   6)
+* regular expressions, operators:        Regexp Usage.        (line  19)
+* regular expressions, operators <1>:    Regexp Operators.    (line   6)
 * regular expressions, anchors in:       Regexp Operator Details.
                                                               (line  18)
-* regular expressions, as field separators: Field Separators. (line  50)
-* regular expressions, as field separators <1>: Regexp Field Splitting.
+* regular expressions, operators, precedence of: Regexp Operator Details.
+                                                              (line 137)
+* regular expressions, leftmost longest match: Leftmost Longest.
                                                               (line   6)
-* regular expressions, as patterns:      Regexp Usage.        (line   6)
-* regular expressions, as patterns <1>:  Regexp Patterns.     (line   6)
-* regular expressions, as record separators: awk split records.
-                                                              (line 131)
-* regular expressions, case sensitivity: Case-sensitivity.    (line   6)
-* regular expressions, case sensitivity <1>: User-modified.   (line  79)
 * regular expressions, computed:         Computed Regexps.    (line   6)
-* regular expressions, constants, See regexp constants: Regexp Usage.
-                                                              (line  57)
 * regular expressions, dynamic:          Computed Regexps.    (line   6)
 * regular expressions, dynamic, with embedded newlines: Computed Regexps.
                                                               (line  60)
-* regular expressions, gawk, command-line options: GNU Regexp Operators.
-                                                              (line  73)
-* regular expressions, interval expressions and: Options.     (line 304)
-* regular expressions, leftmost longest match: Leftmost Longest.
+* regular expressions, operators, gawk:  GNU Regexp Operators.
                                                               (line   6)
-* regular expressions, operators:        Regexp Usage.        (line  19)
-* regular expressions, operators <1>:    Regexp Operators.    (line   6)
-* regular expressions, operators, for buffers: GNU Regexp Operators.
-                                                              (line  51)
 * regular expressions, operators, for words: GNU Regexp Operators.
                                                               (line   6)
-* regular expressions, operators, gawk:  GNU Regexp Operators.
+* regular expressions, operators, for buffers: GNU Regexp Operators.
+                                                              (line  51)
+* regular expressions, gawk, command-line options: GNU Regexp Operators.
+                                                              (line  73)
+* regular expressions, case sensitivity: Case-sensitivity.    (line   6)
+* regular expressions, as record separators: awk split records.
+                                                              (line 131)
+* regular expressions, as field separators: Field Separators. (line  50)
+* regular expressions, as field separators <1>: Regexp Field Splitting.
                                                               (line   6)
-* regular expressions, operators, precedence of: Regexp Operator Details.
-                                                              (line 137)
+* regular expressions, as patterns <1>:  Regexp Patterns.     (line   6)
+* regular expressions, case sensitivity <1>: User-modified.   (line  79)
 * regular expressions, searching for:    Egrep Program.       (line   6)
-* relational operators, See comparison operators: Typing and Comparison.
-                                                              (line   9)
 * replace in string:                     String Functions.    (line 414)
 * retrying input:                        Retrying Input.      (line   6)
 * return debugger command:               Debugger Execution Control.
@@ -36374,35 +36466,34 @@ Index
 * revtwoway extension:                   Extension Sample Rev2way.
                                                               (line  12)
 * rewind() user-defined function:        Rewind Function.     (line  15)
-* right angle bracket (>), > operator:   Comparison Operators.
-                                                              (line  11)
-* right angle bracket (>), > operator <1>: Precedence.        (line  64)
 * right angle bracket (>), > operator (I/O): Redirection.     (line  22)
+* right angle bracket (>), >> operator (I/O): Redirection.    (line  50)
 * right angle bracket (>), >= operator:  Comparison Operators.
                                                               (line  11)
+* right angle bracket (>), > operator:   Comparison Operators.
+                                                              (line  11)
 * right angle bracket (>), >= operator <1>: Precedence.       (line  64)
-* right angle bracket (>), >> operator (I/O): Redirection.    (line  50)
+* right angle bracket (>), > operator <1>: Precedence.        (line  64)
 * right angle bracket (>), >> operator (I/O) <1>: Precedence. (line  64)
-* right shift:                           Bitwise Functions.   (line  54)
 * right shift, bitwise:                  Bitwise Functions.   (line  32)
 * Ritchie, Dennis:                       Basic Data Typing.   (line  54)
 * RLENGTH variable:                      Auto-set.            (line 335)
 * RLENGTH variable, match() function and: String Functions.   (line 228)
+* Robbins, Miriam:                       Acknowledgments.     (line  94)
+* Robbins, Jean:                         Acknowledgments.     (line  94)
+* Robbins, Harry:                        Acknowledgments.     (line  94)
 * Robbins, Arnold:                       Command Line Field Separator.
                                                               (line  71)
+* Robbins, Bill:                         Getline/Pipe.        (line  40)
+* Robbins, Miriam <1>:                   Getline/Pipe.        (line  40)
 * Robbins, Arnold <1>:                   Getline/Pipe.        (line  40)
 * Robbins, Arnold <2>:                   Passwd Functions.    (line  90)
+* Robbins, Miriam <2>:                   Passwd Functions.    (line  90)
 * Robbins, Arnold <3>:                   Alarm Program.       (line   6)
 * Robbins, Arnold <4>:                   General Data Types.  (line   6)
 * Robbins, Arnold <5>:                   Contributors.        (line 152)
 * Robbins, Arnold <6>:                   Maintainers.         (line  14)
 * Robbins, Arnold <7>:                   Future Extensions.   (line   6)
-* Robbins, Bill:                         Getline/Pipe.        (line  40)
-* Robbins, Harry:                        Acknowledgments.     (line  94)
-* Robbins, Jean:                         Acknowledgments.     (line  94)
-* Robbins, Miriam:                       Acknowledgments.     (line  94)
-* Robbins, Miriam <1>:                   Getline/Pipe.        (line  40)
-* Robbins, Miriam <2>:                   Passwd Functions.    (line  90)
 * Rommel, Kai Uwe:                       Contributors.        (line  43)
 * round to nearest integer:              Numeric Functions.   (line  24)
 * round() user-defined function:         Round Function.      (line  16)
@@ -36411,8 +36502,8 @@ Index
 * ROUNDMODE variable <1>:                Setting the rounding mode.
                                                               (line   6)
 * RS variable:                           awk split records.   (line  12)
-* RS variable <1>:                       User-modified.       (line 136)
 * RS variable, multiline records and:    Multiple Line.       (line  17)
+* RS variable <1>:                       User-modified.       (line 136)
 * rshift:                                Bitwise Functions.   (line  54)
 * RSTART variable:                       Auto-set.            (line 341)
 * RSTART variable, match() function and: String Functions.    (line 228)
@@ -36442,14 +36533,14 @@ Index
 * Schreiber, Bert:                       Acknowledgments.     (line  38)
 * Schreiber, Rita:                       Acknowledgments.     (line  38)
 * search and replace in strings:         String Functions.    (line  89)
-* search in string:                      String Functions.    (line 156)
-* search paths:                          Programs Exercises.  (line  70)
-* search paths <1>:                      PC Using.            (line  13)
-* search paths <2>:                      VMS Running.         (line  57)
-* search paths, for loadable extensions: AWKLIBPATH Variable. (line   6)
+* search for substring:                  String Functions.    (line 156)
 * search paths, for source files:        AWKPATH Variable.    (line   6)
+* search paths, for loadable extensions: AWKLIBPATH Variable. (line   6)
+* search paths:                          Programs Exercises.  (line  70)
 * search paths, for source files <1>:    Programs Exercises.  (line  70)
+* search paths <1>:                      PC Using.            (line  13)
 * search paths, for source files <2>:    PC Using.            (line  13)
+* search paths <2>:                      VMS Running.         (line  57)
 * search paths, for source files <3>:    VMS Running.         (line  57)
 * searching, files for regular expressions: Egrep Program.    (line   6)
 * searching, for words:                  Dupword Program.     (line   6)
@@ -36457,24 +36548,26 @@ Index
 * sed utility <1>:                       Simple Sed.          (line   6)
 * sed utility <2>:                       Glossary.            (line  16)
 * seeding random number generator:       Numeric Functions.   (line  64)
-* semicolon (;), AWKPATH variable and:   PC Using.            (line  13)
-* semicolon (;), separating rules:       Statements/Lines.    (line  90)
 * semicolon (;), separating statements in actions: Statements/Lines.
                                                               (line  90)
+* semicolon (;), separating rules:       Statements/Lines.    (line  90)
 * semicolon (;), separating statements in actions <1>: Action Overview.
                                                               (line  19)
 * semicolon (;), separating statements in actions <2>: Statements.
                                                               (line  10)
-* separators, field:                     User-modified.       (line  53)
-* separators, field <1>:                 User-modified.       (line 116)
-* separators, field, FIELDWIDTHS variable and: User-modified. (line  37)
-* separators, field, FPAT variable and:  User-modified.       (line  46)
+* semicolon (;), AWKPATH variable and:   PC Using.            (line  13)
 * separators, for records:               awk split records.   (line   6)
 * separators, for records <1>:           awk split records.   (line  85)
-* separators, for records <2>:           User-modified.       (line 136)
 * separators, for records, regular expressions as: awk split records.
                                                               (line 131)
+* separators, field, FS variable and:    Default Field Splitting.
+                                                              (line   6)
 * separators, for statements in actions: Action Overview.     (line  19)
+* separators, field, FIELDWIDTHS variable and: User-modified. (line  37)
+* separators, field, FPAT variable and:  User-modified.       (line  46)
+* separators, field:                     User-modified.       (line  53)
+* separators, field <1>:                 User-modified.       (line 116)
+* separators, for records <2>:           User-modified.       (line 136)
 * separators, subscript:                 User-modified.       (line 149)
 * set breakpoint:                        Breakpoint Control.  (line  11)
 * set debugger command:                  Viewing And Changing Data.
@@ -36483,81 +36576,92 @@ Index
 * set watchpoint:                        Viewing And Changing Data.
                                                               (line  70)
 * shadowing of variable values:          Definition Syntax.   (line  77)
+* shell function, gawkpath_default:      Shell Startup Files. (line  12)
+* shell function, gawkpath_prepend:      Shell Startup Files. (line  15)
+* shell function, gawkpath_append:       Shell Startup Files. (line  19)
+* shell function, gawklibpath_default:   Shell Startup Files. (line  22)
+* shell function, gawklibpath_prepend:   Shell Startup Files. (line  25)
+* shell function, gawklibpath_append:    Shell Startup Files. (line  29)
 * shell quoting, rules for:              Quoting.             (line   6)
-* shells, piping commands into:          Redirection.         (line 136)
-* shells, quoting:                       Using Shell Variables.
-                                                              (line  12)
-* shells, quoting, rules for:            Quoting.             (line  18)
 * shells, scripts:                       One-shot.            (line  22)
+* shells, quoting, rules for:            Quoting.             (line  18)
 * shells, sea:                           Undocumented.        (line   9)
+* shells, piping commands into:          Redirection.         (line 136)
 * shells, variables:                     Using Shell Variables.
                                                               (line   6)
+* shells, quoting:                       Using Shell Variables.
+                                                              (line  12)
 * shift, bitwise:                        Bitwise Functions.   (line  32)
 * short-circuit operators:               Boolean Ops.         (line  59)
-* show all source files, in debugger:    Debugger Info.       (line  45)
-* show breakpoints:                      Debugger Info.       (line  21)
-* show function arguments, in debugger:  Debugger Info.       (line  18)
-* show local variables, in debugger:     Debugger Info.       (line  34)
-* show name of current source file, in debugger: Debugger Info.
+* show in debugger, function arguments:  Debugger Info.       (line  18)
+* show in debugger, breakpoints:         Debugger Info.       (line  21)
+* show in debugger, local variables:     Debugger Info.       (line  34)
+* show in debugger, name of current source file: Debugger Info.
                                                               (line  37)
-* show watchpoints:                      Debugger Info.       (line  51)
+* show in debugger, all source files:    Debugger Info.       (line  45)
+* show in debugger, watchpoints:         Debugger Info.       (line  51)
 * si debugger command (alias for stepi): Debugger Execution Control.
                                                               (line  75)
+* side effects, FILENAME variable:       Getline Notes.       (line  19)
 * side effects:                          Concatenation.       (line  41)
+* side effects, assignment expressions:  Assignment Ops.      (line  22)
 * side effects <1>:                      Increment Ops.       (line  11)
+* side effects, decrement/increment operators: Increment Ops. (line  11)
 * side effects <2>:                      Increment Ops.       (line  75)
-* side effects, array indexing:          Reference to Elements.
-                                                              (line  43)
-* side effects, asort() function:        Array Sorting Functions.
-                                                              (line  24)
-* side effects, assignment expressions:  Assignment Ops.      (line  22)
 * side effects, Boolean operators:       Boolean Ops.         (line  30)
 * side effects, conditional expressions: Conditional Exp.     (line  22)
-* side effects, decrement/increment operators: Increment Ops. (line  11)
-* side effects, FILENAME variable:       Getline Notes.       (line  19)
 * side effects, function calls:          Function Calls.      (line  57)
 * side effects, statements:              Action Overview.     (line  32)
-* sidebar, A Constant's Base Does Not Affect Its Value: Nondecimal-numbers.
-                                                              (line  63)
+* side effects, array indexing:          Reference to Elements.
+                                                              (line  43)
+* side effects, match() function:        String Functions.    (line 228)
+* side effects, sub() function:          String Functions.    (line 468)
+* side effects, gsub() function:         String Functions.    (line 468)
+* side effects, asort() function:        Array Sorting Functions.
+                                                              (line  24)
+* side effects, asorti() function:       Array Sorting Functions.
+                                                              (line  24)
+* sidebar, Recipe for a Programming Language: History.        (line   6)
+* sidebar, Understanding #!:             Executable Scripts.  (line  31)
 * sidebar, Backslash Before Regular Characters: Escape Sequences.
                                                               (line 106)
-* sidebar, Beware The Smoke and Mirrors!: Bitwise Functions.  (line 127)
-* sidebar, Changing FS Does Not Affect the Fields: Full Line Fields.
-                                                              (line  14)
-* sidebar, Changing NR and FNR:          Auto-set.            (line 407)
-* sidebar, Controlling Output Buffering with system(): I/O Functions.
-                                                              (line 166)
 * sidebar, Escape Sequences for Metacharacters: Escape Sequences.
                                                               (line 138)
+* sidebar, Using \n in Bracket Expressions of Dynamic Regexps: Computed 
Regexps.
+                                                              (line  58)
+* sidebar, RS = "\0" Is Not Portable:    gawk split records.  (line  63)
+* sidebar, Understanding $0:             Changing Fields.     (line 135)
+* sidebar, Changing FS Does Not Affect the Fields: Full Line Fields.
+                                                              (line  14)
 * sidebar, FS and IGNORECASE:            Field Splitting Summary.
                                                               (line  37)
-* sidebar, Interactive Versus Noninteractive Buffering: I/O Functions.
-                                                              (line  74)
-* sidebar, Matching the Null String:     String Functions.    (line 540)
-* sidebar, Operator Evaluation Order:    Increment Ops.       (line  58)
 * sidebar, Piping into sh:               Redirection.         (line 134)
+* sidebar, Using close()'s Return Value: Close Files And Pipes.
+                                                              (line 130)
+* sidebar, A Constant's Base Does Not Affect Its Value: Nondecimal-numbers.
+                                                              (line  63)
 * sidebar, Pre-POSIX awk Used OFMT for String Conversion: Strings And Numbers.
                                                               (line  54)
-* sidebar, Recipe for a Programming Language: History.        (line   6)
-* sidebar, Rounding Modes and Conversion: Setting the rounding mode.
-                                                              (line  65)
-* sidebar, RS = "\0" Is Not Portable:    gawk split records.  (line  63)
-* sidebar, So Why Does gawk Have BEGINFILE and ENDFILE?: Filetrans Function.
-                                                              (line  83)
 * sidebar, Syntactic Ambiguities Between /= and Regular Expressions: 
Assignment Ops.
                                                               (line 147)
-* sidebar, Understanding #!:             Executable Scripts.  (line  31)
-* sidebar, Understanding $0:             Changing Fields.     (line 135)
-* sidebar, Using close()'s Return Value: Close Files And Pipes.
-                                                              (line 130)
-* sidebar, Using \n in Bracket Expressions of Dynamic Regexps: Computed 
Regexps.
-                                                              (line  58)
+* sidebar, Operator Evaluation Order:    Increment Ops.       (line  58)
+* sidebar, Changing NR and FNR:          Auto-set.            (line 407)
+* sidebar, Matching the Null String:     String Functions.    (line 540)
+* sidebar, Interactive Versus Noninteractive Buffering: I/O Functions.
+                                                              (line  74)
+* sidebar, Controlling Output Buffering with system(): I/O Functions.
+                                                              (line 166)
+* sidebar, Beware The Smoke and Mirrors!: Bitwise Functions.  (line 127)
+* sidebar, So Why Does gawk Have BEGINFILE and ENDFILE?: Filetrans Function.
+                                                              (line  83)
+* sidebar, Rounding Modes and Conversion: Setting the rounding mode.
+                                                              (line  65)
 * SIGHUP signal, for dynamic profiling:  Profiling.           (line 211)
 * SIGINT signal (MS-Windows):            Profiling.           (line 214)
+* signals, USR1/SIGUSR1, for profiling:  Profiling.           (line 188)
 * signals, HUP/SIGHUP, for profiling:    Profiling.           (line 211)
 * signals, INT/SIGINT (MS-Windows):      Profiling.           (line 214)
 * signals, QUIT/SIGQUIT (MS-Windows):    Profiling.           (line 214)
-* signals, USR1/SIGUSR1, for profiling:  Profiling.           (line 188)
 * signature program:                     Signature Program.   (line   6)
 * SIGQUIT signal (MS-Windows):           Profiling.           (line 214)
 * SIGUSR1 signal, for dynamic profiling: Profiling.           (line 188)
@@ -36566,9 +36670,9 @@ Index
 * sin:                                   Numeric Functions.   (line  75)
 * sine:                                  Numeric Functions.   (line  75)
 * single quote ('):                      One-shot.            (line  15)
-* single quote (') in gawk command lines: Long.               (line  35)
-* single quote ('), in shell commands:   Quoting.             (line  48)
+* single quote ('), in gawk command lines: Long.              (line  35)
 * single quote ('), vs. apostrophe:      Comments.            (line  27)
+* single quote ('), in shell commands:   Quoting.             (line  48)
 * single quote ('), with double quotes:  Quoting.             (line  73)
 * single records, treating files as:     gawk split records.  (line  92)
 * single-character fields:               Single Character Fields.
@@ -36589,22 +36693,24 @@ Index
 * sort utility, coprocesses and:         Two-way I/O.         (line  66)
 * sorting characters in different languages: Explaining gettext.
                                                               (line  94)
-* source code, awka:                     Other Versions.      (line  64)
+* source code, mixing:                   Options.             (line 121)
+* source code, gawk:                     Gawk Distribution.   (line   6)
 * source code, Brian Kernighan's awk:    Other Versions.      (line  13)
+* source code, mawk:                     Other Versions.      (line  39)
+* source code, awka:                     Other Versions.      (line  64)
+* source code, pawk (profiling version of Brian Kernighan's awk): Other 
Versions.
+                                                              (line  78)
 * source code, BusyBox Awk:              Other Versions.      (line  88)
-* source code, embeddable awk interpreter: Other Versions.    (line 132)
-* source code, gawk:                     Gawk Distribution.   (line   6)
-* source code, goawk:                    Other Versions.      (line 113)
+* source code, Solaris awk:              Other Versions.      (line  96)
 * source code, Illumos awk:              Other Versions.      (line 105)
+* source code, goawk:                    Other Versions.      (line 113)
 * source code, jawk:                     Other Versions.      (line 121)
 * source code, libmawk:                  Other Versions.      (line 129)
-* source code, mawk:                     Other Versions.      (line  39)
-* source code, mixing:                   Options.             (line 121)
-* source code, pawk:                     Other Versions.      (line  78)
+* source code, embeddable awk interpreter: Other Versions.    (line 132)
 * source code, pawk (Python version):    Other Versions.      (line 137)
 * source code, QSE awk:                  Other Versions.      (line 143)
 * source code, QuikTrim Awk:             Other Versions.      (line 147)
-* source code, Solaris awk:              Other Versions.      (line  96)
+* source file, show in debugger:         Debugger Info.       (line  37)
 * source files, search path for:         Programs Exercises.  (line  70)
 * sparse arrays:                         Array Intro.         (line  76)
 * Spencer, Henry:                        Glossary.            (line  16)
@@ -36634,9 +36740,9 @@ Index
 * starting the debugger:                 Debugger Invocation. (line   6)
 * stat() extension function:             Extension Sample File Functions.
                                                               (line  18)
-* statements, compound, control statements and: Statements.   (line  10)
-* statements, control, in actions:       Statements.          (line   6)
 * statements, multiple:                  Statements/Lines.    (line  90)
+* statements, control, in actions:       Statements.          (line   6)
+* statements, compound, control statements and: Statements.   (line  10)
 * step debugger command:                 Debugger Execution Control.
                                                               (line  68)
 * stepi debugger command:                Debugger Execution Control.
@@ -36646,31 +36752,31 @@ Index
 * stream editors:                        Full Line Fields.    (line  22)
 * stream editors <1>:                    Simple Sed.          (line   6)
 * strftime:                              Time Functions.      (line  50)
-* string constants:                      Scalar Constants.    (line  15)
-* string constants, vs. regexp constants: Computed Regexps.   (line  40)
-* string extraction (internationalization): String Extraction.
+* string, constants, vs. regexp constants: Computed Regexps.  (line  40)
+* string, constants:                     Scalar Constants.    (line  15)
+* string, operators:                     Concatenation.       (line   9)
+* string, length:                        String Functions.    (line 171)
+* string, regular expression match of:   String Functions.    (line 211)
+* string, extraction (internationalization): String Extraction.
                                                               (line   6)
-* string length:                         String Functions.    (line 171)
-* string operators:                      Concatenation.       (line   9)
-* string, regular expression match:      String Functions.    (line 211)
 * string-manipulation functions:         String Functions.    (line   6)
 * string-matching operators:             Regexp Usage.        (line  19)
 * string-translation functions:          I18N Functions.      (line   6)
-* strings splitting, example:            String Functions.    (line 337)
+* strings, empty:                        awk split records.   (line 121)
+* strings, null:                         Regexp Field Splitting.
+                                                              (line  43)
+* strings, length limitations:           Scalar Constants.    (line  20)
 * strings, continuation across lines:    Scalar Constants.    (line  53)
 * strings, converting:                   Strings And Numbers. (line   6)
-* strings, converting <1>:               Bitwise Functions.   (line 109)
-* strings, converting letter case:       String Functions.    (line 528)
+* strings, numeric:                      Variable Typing.     (line  67)
 * strings, converting, numbers to:       User-modified.       (line  30)
 * strings, converting, numbers to <1>:   User-modified.       (line 107)
-* strings, empty, See null strings:      awk split records.   (line 121)
-* strings, extracting:                   String Extraction.   (line   6)
-* strings, for localization:             Programmer i18n.     (line  13)
-* strings, length limitations:           Scalar Constants.    (line  20)
+* strings, splitting, example:           String Functions.    (line 337)
+* strings, converting letter case:       String Functions.    (line 528)
+* strings, converting <1>:               Bitwise Functions.   (line 109)
 * strings, merging arrays into:          Join Function.       (line   6)
-* strings, null:                         Regexp Field Splitting.
-                                                              (line  43)
-* strings, numeric:                      Variable Typing.     (line  67)
+* strings, for localization:             Programmer i18n.     (line  13)
+* strings, extracting:                   String Extraction.   (line   6)
 * strtonum:                              String Functions.    (line 396)
 * strtonum() function (gawk), --non-decimal-data option and: Nondecimal Data.
                                                               (line  35)
@@ -36680,13 +36786,13 @@ Index
 * sub() function, arguments of:          String Functions.    (line 468)
 * sub() function, escape processing:     Gory Details.        (line   6)
 * subscript separators:                  User-modified.       (line 149)
-* subscripts in arrays, multidimensional: Multidimensional.   (line  10)
-* subscripts in arrays, multidimensional, scanning: Multiscanning.
-                                                              (line  11)
 * subscripts in arrays, numbers as:      Numeric Array Subscripts.
                                                               (line   6)
 * subscripts in arrays, uninitialized variables as: Uninitialized Subscripts.
                                                               (line   6)
+* subscripts in arrays, multidimensional: Multidimensional.   (line  10)
+* subscripts in arrays, multidimensional, scanning: Multiscanning.
+                                                              (line  11)
 * SUBSEP variable:                       User-modified.       (line 149)
 * SUBSEP variable, multidimensional arrays and: Multidimensional.
                                                               (line  16)
@@ -36704,8 +36810,8 @@ Index
 * t debugger command (alias for tbreak): Breakpoint Control.  (line  90)
 * tbreak debugger command:               Breakpoint Control.  (line  90)
 * Tcl:                                   Library Names.       (line  58)
-* TCP/IP:                                TCP/IP Networking.   (line   6)
 * TCP/IP, support for:                   Special Network.     (line   6)
+* TCP/IP:                                TCP/IP Networking.   (line   6)
 * tee utility:                           Tee Program.         (line   6)
 * tee.awk program:                       Tee Program.         (line  26)
 * temporary breakpoint:                  Breakpoint Control.  (line  90)
@@ -36714,16 +36820,16 @@ Index
 * testext extension:                     Extension Sample API Tests.
                                                               (line   6)
 * Texinfo:                               Conventions.         (line   6)
+* Texinfo, chapter beginnings in files:  Regexp Operator Details.
+                                                              (line  18)
 * Texinfo <1>:                           Library Functions.   (line  33)
 * Texinfo <2>:                           Dupword Program.     (line  17)
+* Texinfo, extracting programs from source files: Extract Program.
+                                                              (line   6)
 * Texinfo <3>:                           Extract Program.     (line  12)
 * Texinfo <4>:                           Distribution contents.
                                                               (line  83)
 * Texinfo <5>:                           Adding Code.         (line 100)
-* Texinfo, chapter beginnings in files:  Regexp Operator Details.
-                                                              (line  18)
-* Texinfo, extracting programs from source files: Extract Program.
-                                                              (line   6)
 * text, printing:                        Print.               (line  22)
 * text, printing, unduplicated lines of: Uniq Program.        (line   6)
 * TEXTDOMAIN variable:                   User-modified.       (line 155)
@@ -36741,12 +36847,12 @@ Index
                                                               (line  98)
 * tilde (~), ~ operator <6>:             Precedence.          (line  79)
 * tilde (~), ~ operator <7>:             Expression Patterns. (line  24)
-* time functions:                        Time Functions.      (line   6)
-* time, alarm clock example program:     Alarm Program.       (line  11)
-* time, localization and:                Explaining gettext.  (line 112)
+* time, retrieving:                      Time Functions.      (line  17)
 * time, managing:                        Getlocaltime Function.
                                                               (line   6)
-* time, retrieving:                      Time Functions.      (line  17)
+* time, alarm clock example program:     Alarm Program.       (line  11)
+* time, localization and:                Explaining gettext.  (line 112)
+* time functions:                        Time Functions.      (line   6)
 * timeout, reading input:                Read Timeout.        (line   6)
 * timestamps:                            Time Functions.      (line   6)
 * timestamps <1>:                        Time Functions.      (line  68)
@@ -36762,56 +36868,57 @@ Index
 * translate string:                      I18N Functions.      (line  21)
 * translate.awk program:                 Translate Program.   (line  55)
 * treating files, as single records:     gawk split records.  (line  92)
+* troubleshooting, typographical errors, global variables: Options.
+                                                              (line 103)
 * troubleshooting, --non-decimal-data option: Options.        (line 236)
-* troubleshooting, == operator:          Comparison Operators.
-                                                              (line  37)
-* troubleshooting, awk uses FS not IFS:  Field Separators.    (line  29)
 * troubleshooting, backslash before nonspecial character: Escape Sequences.
                                                               (line 108)
-* troubleshooting, division:             Arithmetic Ops.      (line  44)
+* troubleshooting, regexp constants vs. string constants: Computed Regexps.
+                                                              (line  40)
+* troubleshooting, awk uses FS not IFS:  Field Separators.    (line  29)
 * troubleshooting, fatal errors, field widths, specifying: Fixed width data.
                                                               (line  17)
+* troubleshooting, print statement, omitting commas: Print Examples.
+                                                              (line  30)
 * troubleshooting, fatal errors, printf format strings: Format Modifiers.
                                                               (line 157)
-* troubleshooting, fflush() function:    I/O Functions.       (line  63)
+* troubleshooting, printing:             Redirection.         (line 112)
+* troubleshooting, quotes with file names: Special FD.        (line  62)
+* troubleshooting, division:             Arithmetic Ops.      (line  44)
+* troubleshooting, string concatenation: Concatenation.       (line  27)
+* troubleshooting, == operator:          Comparison Operators.
+                                                              (line  37)
 * troubleshooting, function call syntax: Function Calls.      (line  30)
-* troubleshooting, gawk:                 Compatibility Mode.  (line   6)
-* troubleshooting, gawk, bug reports:    Bugs.                (line   9)
 * troubleshooting, gawk, fatal errors, function arguments: Calling Built-in.
                                                               (line  16)
-* troubleshooting, getline function:     File Checking.       (line  25)
-* troubleshooting, gsub()/sub() functions: String Functions.  (line 478)
 * troubleshooting, match() function:     String Functions.    (line 292)
-* troubleshooting, print statement, omitting commas: Print Examples.
-                                                              (line  30)
-* troubleshooting, printing:             Redirection.         (line 112)
-* troubleshooting, quotes with file names: Special FD.        (line  62)
-* troubleshooting, readable data files:  File Checking.       (line   6)
-* troubleshooting, regexp constants vs. string constants: Computed Regexps.
-                                                              (line  40)
-* troubleshooting, string concatenation: Concatenation.       (line  27)
+* troubleshooting, gsub()/sub() functions: String Functions.  (line 478)
 * troubleshooting, substr() function:    String Functions.    (line 505)
+* troubleshooting, fflush() function:    I/O Functions.       (line  63)
 * troubleshooting, system() function:    I/O Functions.       (line 128)
-* troubleshooting, typographical errors, global variables: Options.
-                                                              (line 103)
+* troubleshooting, readable data files:  File Checking.       (line   6)
+* troubleshooting, getline command:      File Checking.       (line  25)
+* troubleshooting, gawk, bug reports:    Bugs.                (line   9)
+* troubleshooting, gawk:                 Compatibility Mode.  (line   6)
 * true, logical:                         Truth Values.        (line   6)
 * Trueman, David:                        History.             (line  30)
 * Trueman, David <1>:                    Acknowledgments.     (line  47)
 * Trueman, David <2>:                    Contributors.        (line  31)
 * trunc-mod operation:                   Arithmetic Ops.      (line  66)
 * truth values:                          Truth Values.        (line   6)
-* type conversion:                       Strings And Numbers. (line  21)
-* type, of variable:                     Type Functions.      (line  14)
+* type, conversion:                      Strings And Numbers. (line  21)
+* type, of variable, typeof() function (gawk): Type Functions.
+                                                              (line  14)
 * typeof:                                Type Functions.      (line  14)
 * u debugger command (alias for until):  Debugger Execution Control.
                                                               (line  82)
 * unassigned array elements:             Reference to Elements.
                                                               (line  18)
 * undefined functions:                   Function Caveats.    (line   6)
-* underscore (_), C macro:               Explaining gettext.  (line  71)
 * underscore (_), in names of private variables: Library Names.
                                                               (line  29)
-* underscore (_), translatable string:   Programmer i18n.     (line  69)
+* underscore (_), C macro:               Explaining gettext.  (line  71)
+* underscore (_), translatable strings:  Programmer i18n.     (line  69)
 * undisplay debugger command:            Viewing And Changing Data.
                                                               (line  83)
 * undocumented features:                 Undocumented.        (line   6)
@@ -36822,14 +36929,14 @@ Index
                                                               (line   6)
 * uniq utility:                          Uniq Program.        (line   6)
 * uniq.awk program:                      Uniq Program.        (line  65)
+* Unix, awk scripts and:                 Executable Scripts.  (line   6)
 * Unix:                                  Glossary.            (line 746)
 * Unix awk, backslashes in escape sequences: Escape Sequences.
                                                               (line 121)
-* Unix awk, close() function and:        Close Files And Pipes.
-                                                              (line 132)
 * Unix awk, password files, field separators and: Command Line Field Separator.
                                                               (line  62)
-* Unix, awk scripts and:                 Executable Scripts.  (line   6)
+* Unix awk, close() function and:        Close Files And Pipes.
+                                                              (line 132)
 * unsigned integers:                     Computer Arithmetic. (line  41)
 * until debugger command:                Debugger Execution Control.
                                                               (line  82)
@@ -36838,26 +36945,56 @@ Index
 * up debugger command:                   Execution Stack.     (line  36)
 * uppercase names, namespace for:        Default Namespace.   (line  10)
 * user database, reading:                Passwd Functions.    (line   6)
-* user-defined functions:                User-defined.        (line   6)
-* user-defined, functions, counts, in a profile: Profiling.   (line 137)
 * user-defined, variables:               Variables.           (line   6)
+* user-defined, function, bits2str():    Bitwise Functions.   (line  69)
+* user-defined, functions:               User-defined.        (line   6)
+* user-defined, function, rev():         Function Example.    (line  54)
+* user-defined, function, ctime():       Function Example.    (line  74)
+* user-defined, function, assert():      Assert Function.     (line  28)
+* user-defined, function, round():       Round Function.      (line  16)
+* user-defined, function, cliff_rand():  Cliff Random Function.
+                                                              (line  12)
+* user-defined, function, ord():         Ordinal Functions.   (line  16)
+* user-defined, function, chr():         Ordinal Functions.   (line  16)
+* user-defined, function, _ord_init():   Ordinal Functions.   (line  16)
+* user-defined, function, join():        Join Function.       (line  18)
+* user-defined, function, getlocaltime(): Getlocaltime Function.
+                                                              (line  16)
+* user-defined, function, readfile():    Readfile Function.   (line  30)
+* user-defined, function, beginfile():   Filetrans Function.  (line  62)
+* user-defined, function, endfile():     Filetrans Function.  (line  62)
+* user-defined, function, rewind():      Rewind Function.     (line  15)
+* user-defined, function, getopt():      Getopt Function.     (line 108)
+* user-defined, function, getopt() <1>:  Getopt Function.     (line 134)
+* user-defined, function, getpwent():    Passwd Functions.    (line  16)
+* user-defined, function, _pw_init():    Passwd Functions.    (line 105)
+* user-defined, function, getpwnam():    Passwd Functions.    (line 180)
+* user-defined, function, getpwuid():    Passwd Functions.    (line 190)
+* user-defined, function, getpwent() <1>: Passwd Functions.   (line 200)
+* user-defined, function, endpwent():    Passwd Functions.    (line 211)
+* user-defined, function, getgrent():    Group Functions.     (line   6)
+* user-defined, function, _gr_init():    Group Functions.     (line  83)
+* user-defined, function, getgrnam():    Group Functions.     (line 178)
+* user-defined, function, getgrgid():    Group Functions.     (line 187)
+* user-defined, function, getgruser():   Group Functions.     (line 196)
+* user-defined, function, getgrent() <1>: Group Functions.    (line 205)
+* user-defined, function, endgrent():    Group Functions.     (line 216)
+* user-defined, function, walk_array():  Walking Arrays.      (line  14)
+* user-defined, functions, counts, in a profile: Profiling.   (line 137)
 * user-modifiable variables:             User-modified.       (line   6)
-* users, information about, printing:    Id Program.          (line   6)
 * users, information about, retrieving:  Passwd Functions.    (line  16)
+* users, information about, printing:    Id Program.          (line   6)
 * USR1 signal, for dynamic profiling:    Profiling.           (line 188)
-* values, numeric:                       Basic Data Typing.   (line  13)
 * values, regexp:                        Strong Regexp Constants.
                                                               (line  24)
+* values, numeric:                       Basic Data Typing.   (line  13)
 * values, string:                        Basic Data Typing.   (line  13)
 * variable assignments and input files:  Other Arguments.     (line  32)
-* variable type:                         Type Functions.      (line  14)
-* variable typing:                       Typing and Comparison.
-                                                              (line   9)
+* variable type, typeof() function (gawk): Type Functions.    (line  14)
 * variables:                             Other Features.      (line   6)
-* variables <1>:                         Basic Data Typing.   (line   6)
-* variables, assigning on command line:  Assignment Options.  (line   6)
-* variables, built-in:                   Using Variables.     (line  23)
-* variables, flag:                       Boolean Ops.         (line  69)
+* variables, setting:                    Options.             (line  36)
+* variables, predefined, -v option, setting with: Options.    (line  45)
+* variables, global, printing list of:   Options.             (line  98)
 * variables, getline command into, using: Getline/Variable.   (line   6)
 * variables, getline command into, using <1>: Getline/Variable/File.
                                                               (line   6)
@@ -36865,35 +37002,36 @@ Index
                                                               (line   6)
 * variables, getline command into, using <3>: Getline/Variable/Coprocess.
                                                               (line   6)
-* variables, global, for library functions: Library Names.    (line  11)
-* variables, global, printing list of:   Options.             (line  98)
+* variables, user-defined:               Variables.           (line   6)
+* variables, built-in:                   Using Variables.     (line  23)
 * variables, initializing:               Using Variables.     (line  23)
-* variables, local to a function:        Variable Scope.      (line   6)
-* variables, predefined:                 Built-in Variables.  (line   6)
-* variables, predefined, -v option, setting with: Options.    (line  45)
-* variables, predefined, conveying information: Auto-set.     (line   6)
-* variables, private:                    Library Names.       (line  11)
-* variables, setting:                    Options.             (line  36)
-* variables, shadowing:                  Definition Syntax.   (line  77)
+* variables, assigning on command line:  Assignment Options.  (line   6)
 * variables, types of:                   Assignment Ops.      (line  39)
 * variables, types of, comparison expressions and: Typing and Comparison.
                                                               (line   9)
+* variables, flag:                       Boolean Ops.         (line  69)
+* variables, predefined:                 Built-in Variables.  (line   6)
+* variables, predefined, conveying information: Auto-set.     (line   6)
 * variables, uninitialized, as array subscripts: Uninitialized Subscripts.
                                                               (line   6)
-* variables, user-defined:               Variables.           (line   6)
-* version of gawk:                       Auto-set.            (line 262)
-* version of gawk extension API:         Auto-set.            (line 287)
-* version of GNU MP library:             Auto-set.            (line 270)
-* version of GNU MPFR library:           Auto-set.            (line 272)
+* variables, shadowing:                  Definition Syntax.   (line  77)
+* variables, local to a function:        Variable Scope.      (line   6)
+* variables, global, for library functions: Library Names.    (line  11)
+* variables, private:                    Library Names.       (line  11)
+* variables <1>:                         Basic Data Typing.   (line   6)
+* version of, gawk:                      Auto-set.            (line 262)
+* version of, GNU MP library:            Auto-set.            (line 270)
+* version of, GNU MPFR library:          Auto-set.            (line 272)
+* version of, gawk extension API:        Auto-set.            (line 287)
 * vertical bar (|):                      Regexp Operator Details.
                                                               (line  66)
 * vertical bar (|), | operator (I/O):    Getline/Pipe.        (line  10)
-* vertical bar (|), | operator (I/O) <1>: Precedence.         (line  64)
 * vertical bar (|), |& operator (I/O):   Getline/Coprocess.   (line   6)
-* vertical bar (|), |& operator (I/O) <1>: Precedence.        (line  64)
-* vertical bar (|), |& operator (I/O) <2>: Two-way I/O.       (line  27)
 * vertical bar (|), || operator:         Boolean Ops.         (line  59)
+* vertical bar (|), | operator (I/O) <1>: Precedence.         (line  64)
+* vertical bar (|), |& operator (I/O) <1>: Precedence.        (line  64)
 * vertical bar (|), || operator <1>:     Precedence.          (line  88)
+* vertical bar (|), |& operator (I/O) <2>: Two-way I/O.       (line  27)
 * Vinschen, Corinna:                     Acknowledgments.     (line  60)
 * w debugger command (alias for watch):  Viewing And Changing Data.
                                                               (line  70)
@@ -36910,18 +37048,19 @@ Index
 * watch debugger command:                Viewing And Changing Data.
                                                               (line  70)
 * watchpoint (debugger):                 Debugging Terms.     (line  42)
+* watchpoints, show in debugger:         Debugger Info.       (line  51)
 * wc utility:                            Wc Program.          (line   6)
 * wc.awk program:                        Wc Program.          (line  46)
 * Weinberger, Peter:                     History.             (line  17)
 * Weinberger, Peter <1>:                 Contributors.        (line  12)
 * where debugger command (alias for backtrace): Execution Stack.
                                                               (line  13)
-* while statement:                       While Statement.     (line   6)
 * while statement, use of regexps in:    Regexp Usage.        (line  19)
+* while statement:                       While Statement.     (line   6)
+* whitespace, newlines as:               Options.             (line 289)
 * whitespace, as field separators:       Default Field Splitting.
                                                               (line   6)
 * whitespace, functions, calling:        Calling Built-in.    (line  10)
-* whitespace, newlines as:               Options.             (line 289)
 * Williams, Kent:                        Contributors.        (line  35)
 * Woehlke, Matthew:                      Contributors.        (line  82)
 * Woods, John:                           Contributors.        (line  28)
@@ -36991,557 +37130,562 @@ Node: Intro Summary116373
 Node: Invoking Gawk117257
 Node: Command Line118771
 Node: Options119569
-Ref: Options-Footnote-1137023
-Ref: Options-Footnote-2137254
-Node: Other Arguments137279
-Node: Naming Standard Input140460
-Node: Environment Variables141670
-Node: AWKPATH Variable142228
-Ref: AWKPATH Variable-Footnote-1145640
-Ref: AWKPATH Variable-Footnote-2145674
-Node: AWKLIBPATH Variable145935
-Node: Other Environment Variables147593
-Node: Exit Status151414
-Node: Include Files152091
-Node: Loading Shared Libraries155781
-Node: Obsolete157209
-Node: Undocumented157901
-Node: Invoking Summary158198
-Node: Regexp161039
-Node: Regexp Usage162493
-Node: Escape Sequences164530
-Node: Regexp Operators170762
-Node: Regexp Operator Details171247
-Ref: Regexp Operator Details-Footnote-1177679
-Node: Interval Expressions177826
-Ref: Interval Expressions-Footnote-1179261
-Node: Bracket Expressions179359
-Ref: table-char-classes181835
-Node: Leftmost Longest185161
-Node: Computed Regexps186464
-Node: GNU Regexp Operators189891
-Node: Case-sensitivity193570
-Ref: Case-sensitivity-Footnote-1196436
-Ref: Case-sensitivity-Footnote-2196671
-Node: Regexp Summary196779
-Node: Reading Files198245
-Node: Records200514
-Node: awk split records201589
-Node: gawk split records206864
-Ref: gawk split records-Footnote-1211450
-Node: Fields211487
-Node: Nonconstant Fields214228
-Ref: Nonconstant Fields-Footnote-1216464
-Node: Changing Fields216668
-Node: Field Separators222699
-Node: Default Field Splitting225397
-Node: Regexp Field Splitting226515
-Node: Single Character Fields229868
-Node: Command Line Field Separator230928
-Node: Full Line Fields234146
-Ref: Full Line Fields-Footnote-1235668
-Ref: Full Line Fields-Footnote-2235714
-Node: Field Splitting Summary235815
-Node: Constant Size237889
-Node: Fixed width data238621
-Node: Skipping intervening242088
-Node: Allowing trailing data242886
-Node: Fields with fixed data243923
-Node: Splitting By Content245441
-Ref: Splitting By Content-Footnote-1249091
-Node: Testing field creation249254
-Node: Multiple Line250879
-Node: Getline257156
-Node: Plain Getline259625
-Node: Getline/Variable262198
-Node: Getline/File263349
-Node: Getline/Variable/File264737
-Ref: Getline/Variable/File-Footnote-1266342
-Node: Getline/Pipe266430
-Node: Getline/Variable/Pipe269134
-Node: Getline/Coprocess270269
-Node: Getline/Variable/Coprocess271536
-Node: Getline Notes272278
-Node: Getline Summary275075
-Ref: table-getline-variants275499
-Node: Read Timeout276247
-Ref: Read Timeout-Footnote-1280153
-Node: Retrying Input280211
-Node: Command-line directories281410
-Node: Input Summary282316
-Node: Input Exercises285488
-Node: Printing285922
-Node: Print287756
-Node: Print Examples289213
-Node: Output Separators291993
-Node: OFMT294010
-Node: Printf295366
-Node: Basic Printf296151
-Node: Control Letters297725
-Node: Format Modifiers302889
-Node: Printf Examples308904
-Node: Redirection311390
-Node: Special FD318231
-Ref: Special FD-Footnote-1321399
-Node: Special Files321473
-Node: Other Inherited Files322090
-Node: Special Network323091
-Node: Special Caveats323951
-Node: Close Files And Pipes324900
-Ref: table-close-pipe-return-values331807
-Ref: Close Files And Pipes-Footnote-1332620
-Ref: Close Files And Pipes-Footnote-2332768
-Node: Nonfatal332920
-Node: Output Summary335258
-Node: Output Exercises336480
-Node: Expressions337159
-Node: Values338347
-Node: Constants339025
-Node: Scalar Constants339716
-Ref: Scalar Constants-Footnote-1342240
-Node: Nondecimal-numbers342490
-Node: Regexp Constants345491
-Node: Using Constant Regexps346017
-Node: Standard Regexp Constants346639
-Node: Strong Regexp Constants349827
-Node: Variables352785
-Node: Using Variables353442
-Node: Assignment Options355352
-Node: Conversion357819
-Node: Strings And Numbers358343
-Ref: Strings And Numbers-Footnote-1361406
-Node: Locale influences conversions361515
-Ref: table-locale-affects364273
-Node: All Operators364891
-Node: Arithmetic Ops365520
-Node: Concatenation368026
-Ref: Concatenation-Footnote-1370873
-Node: Assignment Ops370980
-Ref: table-assign-ops375971
-Node: Increment Ops377284
-Node: Truth Values and Conditions380744
-Node: Truth Values381818
-Node: Typing and Comparison382866
-Node: Variable Typing383686
-Ref: Variable Typing-Footnote-1390149
-Ref: Variable Typing-Footnote-2390221
-Node: Comparison Operators390298
-Ref: table-relational-ops390717
-Node: POSIX String Comparison394212
-Ref: POSIX String Comparison-Footnote-1395907
-Ref: POSIX String Comparison-Footnote-2396046
-Node: Boolean Ops396130
-Ref: Boolean Ops-Footnote-1400612
-Node: Conditional Exp400704
-Node: Function Calls402440
-Node: Precedence406317
-Node: Locales409976
-Node: Expressions Summary411608
-Node: Patterns and Actions414181
-Node: Pattern Overview415301
-Node: Regexp Patterns416978
-Node: Expression Patterns417520
-Node: Ranges421301
-Node: BEGIN/END424409
-Node: Using BEGIN/END425170
-Ref: Using BEGIN/END-Footnote-1427906
-Node: I/O And BEGIN/END428012
-Node: BEGINFILE/ENDFILE430326
-Node: Empty433239
-Node: Using Shell Variables433556
-Node: Action Overview435830
-Node: Statements438155
-Node: If Statement440003
-Node: While Statement441498
-Node: Do Statement443526
-Node: For Statement444674
-Node: Switch Statement447845
-Node: Break Statement450231
-Node: Continue Statement452323
-Node: Next Statement454150
-Node: Nextfile Statement456533
-Node: Exit Statement459185
-Node: Built-in Variables461588
-Node: User-modified462721
-Node: Auto-set470488
-Ref: Auto-set-Footnote-1487295
-Ref: Auto-set-Footnote-2487501
-Node: ARGC and ARGV487557
-Node: Pattern Action Summary491770
-Node: Arrays494200
-Node: Array Basics495529
-Node: Array Intro496373
-Ref: figure-array-elements498348
-Ref: Array Intro-Footnote-1501052
-Node: Reference to Elements501180
-Node: Assigning Elements503644
-Node: Array Example504135
-Node: Scanning an Array505894
-Node: Controlling Scanning508916
-Ref: Controlling Scanning-Footnote-1514315
-Node: Numeric Array Subscripts514631
-Node: Uninitialized Subscripts516815
-Node: Delete518434
-Ref: Delete-Footnote-1521186
-Node: Multidimensional521243
-Node: Multiscanning524338
-Node: Arrays of Arrays525929
-Node: Arrays Summary530697
-Node: Functions532790
-Node: Built-in533828
-Node: Calling Built-in534909
-Node: Numeric Functions536905
-Ref: Numeric Functions-Footnote-1540933
-Ref: Numeric Functions-Footnote-2541581
-Ref: Numeric Functions-Footnote-3541629
-Node: String Functions541901
-Ref: String Functions-Footnote-1565759
-Ref: String Functions-Footnote-2565887
-Ref: String Functions-Footnote-3566135
-Node: Gory Details566222
-Ref: table-sub-escapes568013
-Ref: table-sub-proposed569532
-Ref: table-posix-sub570895
-Ref: table-gensub-escapes572436
-Ref: Gory Details-Footnote-1573259
-Node: I/O Functions573413
-Ref: table-system-return-values579881
-Ref: I/O Functions-Footnote-1581961
-Ref: I/O Functions-Footnote-2582109
-Node: Time Functions582229
-Ref: Time Functions-Footnote-1592900
-Ref: Time Functions-Footnote-2592968
-Ref: Time Functions-Footnote-3593126
-Ref: Time Functions-Footnote-4593237
-Ref: Time Functions-Footnote-5593349
-Ref: Time Functions-Footnote-6593576
-Node: Bitwise Functions593842
-Ref: table-bitwise-ops594436
-Ref: Bitwise Functions-Footnote-1600499
-Ref: Bitwise Functions-Footnote-2600672
-Node: Type Functions600863
-Node: I18N Functions603726
-Node: User-defined605377
-Node: Definition Syntax606189
-Ref: Definition Syntax-Footnote-1611876
-Node: Function Example611947
-Ref: Function Example-Footnote-1614869
-Node: Function Calling614891
-Node: Calling A Function615479
-Node: Variable Scope616437
-Node: Pass By Value/Reference619431
-Node: Function Caveats622075
-Ref: Function Caveats-Footnote-1624122
-Node: Return Statement624242
-Node: Dynamic Typing627221
-Node: Indirect Calls628151
-Ref: Indirect Calls-Footnote-1638403
-Node: Functions Summary638531
-Node: Library Functions641236
-Ref: Library Functions-Footnote-1644843
-Ref: Library Functions-Footnote-2644986
-Node: Library Names645157
-Ref: Library Names-Footnote-1648824
-Ref: Library Names-Footnote-2649047
-Node: General Functions649133
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+Ref: FP Math Caution-Footnote-1953883
+Node: Inexactness of computations954252
+Node: Inexact representation955212
+Node: Comparing FP Values956572
+Node: Errors accumulate957813
+Node: Getting Accuracy959246
+Node: Try To Round961956
+Node: Setting precision962855
+Ref: table-predefined-precision-strings963552
+Node: Setting the rounding mode965382
+Ref: table-gawk-rounding-modes965756
+Ref: Setting the rounding mode-Footnote-1969687
+Node: Arbitrary Precision Integers969866
+Ref: Arbitrary Precision Integers-Footnote-1973041
+Node: Checking for MPFR973190
+Node: POSIX Floating Point Problems974664
+Ref: POSIX Floating Point Problems-Footnote-1978949
+Node: Floating point summary978987
+Node: Dynamic Extensions981177
+Node: Extension Intro982730
+Node: Plugin License983996
+Node: Extension Mechanism Outline984793
+Ref: figure-load-extension985232
+Ref: figure-register-new-function986797
+Ref: figure-call-new-function987889
+Node: Extension API Description989951
+Node: Extension API Functions Introduction991593
+Ref: table-api-std-headers993429
+Node: General Data Types997294
+Ref: General Data Types-Footnote-11005655
+Node: Memory Allocation Functions1005954
+Ref: Memory Allocation Functions-Footnote-11010164
+Node: Constructor Functions1010263
+Node: Registration Functions1013849
+Node: Extension Functions1014534
+Node: Exit Callback Functions1019856
+Node: Extension Version String1021106
+Node: Input Parsers1021769
+Node: Output Wrappers1034490
+Node: Two-way processors1039002
+Node: Printing Messages1041267
+Ref: Printing Messages-Footnote-11042438
+Node: Updating ERRNO1042591
+Node: Requesting Values1043330
+Ref: table-value-types-returned1044067
+Node: Accessing Parameters1045003
+Node: Symbol Table Access1046238
+Node: Symbol table by name1046750
+Ref: Symbol table by name-Footnote-11049774
+Node: Symbol table by cookie1049902
+Ref: Symbol table by cookie-Footnote-11054087
+Node: Cached values1054151
+Ref: Cached values-Footnote-11057687
+Node: Array Manipulation1057840
+Ref: Array Manipulation-Footnote-11058931
+Node: Array Data Types1058968
+Ref: Array Data Types-Footnote-11061626
+Node: Array Functions1061718
+Node: Flattening Arrays1066216
+Node: Creating Arrays1073192
+Node: Redirection API1077959
+Node: Extension API Variables1080792
+Node: Extension Versioning1081503
+Ref: gawk-api-version1081932
+Node: Extension GMP/MPFR Versioning1083663
+Node: Extension API Informational Variables1085291
+Node: Extension API Boilerplate1086364
+Node: Changes from API V11090338
+Node: Finding Extensions1091910
+Node: Extension Example1092469
+Node: Internal File Description1093267
+Node: Internal File Ops1097347
+Ref: Internal File Ops-Footnote-11108697
+Node: Using Internal File Ops1108837
+Ref: Using Internal File Ops-Footnote-11111220
+Node: Extension Samples1111494
+Node: Extension Sample File Functions1113023
+Node: Extension Sample Fnmatch1120672
+Node: Extension Sample Fork1122159
+Node: Extension Sample Inplace1123377
+Node: Extension Sample Ord1127002
+Node: Extension Sample Readdir1127838
+Ref: table-readdir-file-types1128727
+Node: Extension Sample Revout1129532
+Node: Extension Sample Rev2way1130121
+Node: Extension Sample Read write array1130861
+Node: Extension Sample Readfile1132803
+Node: Extension Sample Time1133898
+Node: Extension Sample API Tests1135246
+Node: gawkextlib1135738
+Node: Extension summary1138656
+Node: Extension Exercises1142358
+Node: Language History1143600
+Node: V7/SVR3.11145256
+Node: SVR41147408
+Node: POSIX1148842
+Node: BTL1150222
+Node: POSIX/GNU1150951
+Node: Feature History1156729
+Node: Common Extensions1172922
+Node: Ranges and Locales1174205
+Ref: Ranges and Locales-Footnote-11178821
+Ref: Ranges and Locales-Footnote-21178848
+Ref: Ranges and Locales-Footnote-31179083
+Node: Contributors1179304
+Node: History summary1185257
+Node: Installation1186637
+Node: Gawk Distribution1187581
+Node: Getting1188065
+Node: Extracting1189028
+Node: Distribution contents1190666
+Node: Unix Installation1197146
+Node: Quick Installation1197828
+Node: Shell Startup Files1200242
+Node: Additional Configuration Options1201331
+Node: Configuration Philosophy1203646
+Node: Non-Unix Installation1206015
+Node: PC Installation1206475
+Node: PC Binary Installation1207313
+Node: PC Compiling1207748
+Node: PC Using1208865
+Node: Cygwin1212418
+Node: MSYS1213642
+Node: VMS Installation1214143
+Node: VMS Compilation1214934
+Ref: VMS Compilation-Footnote-11216163
+Node: VMS Dynamic Extensions1216221
+Node: VMS Installation Details1217906
+Node: VMS Running1220159
+Node: VMS GNV1224438
+Node: VMS Old Gawk1225173
+Node: Bugs1225644
+Node: Bug address1226307
+Node: Usenet1229289
+Node: Maintainers1230293
+Node: Other Versions1231554
+Node: Installation summary1238642
+Node: Notes1239844
+Node: Compatibility Mode1240638
+Node: Additions1241420
+Node: Accessing The Source1242345
+Node: Adding Code1243782
+Node: New Ports1250001
+Node: Derived Files1254376
+Ref: Derived Files-Footnote-11260036
+Ref: Derived Files-Footnote-21260071
+Ref: Derived Files-Footnote-31260669
+Node: Future Extensions1260783
+Node: Implementation Limitations1261441
+Node: Extension Design1262624
+Node: Old Extension Problems1263768
+Ref: Old Extension Problems-Footnote-11265286
+Node: Extension New Mechanism Goals1265343
+Ref: Extension New Mechanism Goals-Footnote-11268707
+Node: Extension Other Design Decisions1268896
+Node: Extension Future Growth1271009
+Node: Notes summary1271845
+Node: Basic Concepts1273003
+Node: Basic High Level1273684
+Ref: figure-general-flow1273966
+Ref: figure-process-flow1274651
+Ref: Basic High Level-Footnote-11277952
+Node: Basic Data Typing1278137
+Node: Glossary1281465
+Node: Copying1313303
+Node: GNU Free Documentation License1350846
+Node: Index1375966
 
 End Tag Table
+
+
+Local Variables:
+coding: utf-8
+End:
diff --git a/doc/gawk.texi b/doc/gawk.texi
index f27d301..2d0c5bc 100644
--- a/doc/gawk.texi
+++ b/doc/gawk.texi
@@ -59,7 +59,7 @@
 @c applies to and all the info about who's publishing this edition
 
 @c These apply across the board.
-@set UPDATE-MONTH July, 2019
+@set UPDATE-MONTH September, 2019
 @set VERSION 5.1
 @set PATCHLEVEL 0
 
@@ -1317,6 +1317,7 @@ October 2014
    </prefaceinfo>
 @end docbook
 
+@cindex @command{awk}
 Several kinds of tasks occur repeatedly when working with text files.
 You might want to extract certain lines and discard the rest.  Or you
 may need to make changes wherever certain patterns appear, but leave the
@@ -1324,6 +1325,7 @@ rest of the file alone.  Such jobs are often easy with 
@command{awk}.
 The @command{awk} utility interprets a special-purpose programming
 language that makes it easy to handle simple data-reformatting jobs.
 
+@cindex @command{gawk}
 The GNU implementation of @command{awk} is called @command{gawk}; if you
 invoke it with the proper options or environment variables,
 it is fully compatible with
@@ -1337,12 +1339,12 @@ properly written @command{awk} programs should work 
with @command{gawk}.
 So most of the time, we don't distinguish between @command{gawk} and other
 @command{awk} implementations.
 
-@cindex @command{awk}, POSIX and, See Also POSIX @command{awk}
-@cindex @command{awk}, POSIX and
-@cindex POSIX, @command{awk} and
-@cindex @command{gawk}, @command{awk} and
-@cindex @command{awk}, @command{gawk} and
-@cindex @command{awk}, uses for
+@cindex @command{awk} @subentry POSIX and @seealso{POSIX @command{awk}}
+@cindex @command{awk} @subentry POSIX and
+@cindex POSIX @subentry @command{awk} and
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry @command{awk} and
+@cindex @command{awk} @subentry @command{gawk} and
+@cindex @command{awk} @subentry uses for
 Using @command{awk} you can:
 
 @itemize @value{BULLET}
@@ -1363,9 +1365,9 @@ Experiment with algorithms that you can adapt later to 
other computer
 languages
 @end itemize
 
-@cindex @command{awk}, See Also @command{gawk}
-@cindex @command{gawk}, See Also @command{awk}
-@cindex @command{gawk}, uses for
+@cindex @command{awk} @seealso{@command{gawk}}
+@cindex @command{gawk} @seealso{@command{awk}}
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry uses for
 In addition,
 @command{gawk}
 provides facilities that make it easy to:
@@ -1395,7 +1397,7 @@ Unix-based systems. If you are using some other operating 
system, you still need
 be familiar with the ideas of I/O redirection and pipes.} as well as basic 
shell
 facilities, such as input/output (I/O) redirection and pipes.
 
-@cindex GNU @command{awk}, See @command{gawk}
+@cindex GNU @command{awk} @seeentry{@command{gawk}}
 Implementations of the @command{awk} language are available for many
 different computing environments.  This @value{DOCUMENT}, while describing
 the @command{awk} language in general, also describes the particular
@@ -1427,7 +1429,7 @@ has been removed.}
 @unnumberedsec History of @command{awk} and @command{gawk}
 @cindex recipe for a programming language
 @cindex programming language, recipe for
-@cindex sidebar, Recipe for a Programming Language
+@cindex sidebar @subentry Recipe for a Programming Language
 @ifdocbook
 @docbook
 <sidebar><title>Recipe for a Programming Language</title>
@@ -1472,7 +1474,7 @@ more parts C.  Document very well and release.
 @cindex Aho, Alfred
 @cindex Weinberger, Peter
 @cindex Kernighan, Brian
-@cindex @command{awk}, history of
+@cindex @command{awk} @subentry history of
 The name @command{awk} comes from the initials of its designers: Alfred V.@:
 Aho, Peter J.@: Weinberger, and Brian W.@: Kernighan.  The original version of
 @command{awk} was written in 1977 at AT&T Bell Laboratories.
@@ -1519,7 +1521,7 @@ for a full list of those who have made important 
contributions to @command{gawk}
 @node Names
 @unnumberedsec A Rose by Any Other Name
 
-@cindex @command{awk}, new vs.@: old
+@cindex @command{awk} @subentry new vs.@: old
 The @command{awk} language has evolved over the years. Full details are
 provided in @ref{Language History}.
 The language described in this @value{DOCUMENT}
@@ -1554,7 +1556,7 @@ specific to the GNU implementation, we use the term 
@command{gawk}.
 
 @node This Manual
 @unnumberedsec Using This Book
-@cindex @command{awk}, terms describing
+@cindex @command{awk} @subentry terms describing
 
 The term @command{awk} refers to a particular program as well as to the 
language you
 use to tell this program what to do.  When we need to be careful, we call
@@ -1566,8 +1568,8 @@ run the @command{awk} utility.
 The term ``@command{awk} program'' refers to a program written by you in
 the @command{awk} programming language.
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, @command{awk} and
-@cindex @command{awk}, @command{gawk} and
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry @command{awk} and
+@cindex @command{awk} @subentry @command{gawk} and
 @cindex POSIX @command{awk}
 Primarily, this @value{DOCUMENT} explains the features of @command{awk}
 as defined in the POSIX standard.  It does so in the context of the
@@ -1926,7 +1928,7 @@ you illuminate, there's always a smaller but darker one.}
 @author Brian Kernighan
 @end quotation
 
-@cindex d.c., See dark corner
+@cindex d.c. @seeentry{dark corner}
 @cindex dark corner
 Until the POSIX standard (and @cite{@value{TITLE}}),
 many features of @command{awk} were either poorly documented or not
@@ -1946,7 +1948,7 @@ They also appear in the index under the heading ``dark 
corner.''
 But, as noted by the opening quote, any coverage of dark
 corners is by definition incomplete.
 
-@cindex c.e., See common extensions
+@cindex c.e. @seeentry{common extensions}
 Extensions to the standard @command{awk} language that are supported by
 more than one @command{awk} implementation are marked
 @ifclear FOR_PRINT
@@ -1970,8 +1972,9 @@ Emacs editor.  GNU Emacs is the most widely used version 
of Emacs today.
 
 @cindex GNU Project
 @cindex GPL (General Public License)
-@cindex General Public License, See GPL
-@cindex documentation, online
+@cindex GNU General Public License @seeentry{GPL}
+@cindex General Public License @seeentry{GPL}
+@cindex documentation @subentry online
 The GNU@footnote{GNU stands for ``GNU's Not Unix.''}
 Project is an ongoing effort on the part of the Free Software
 Foundation to create a complete, freely distributable, POSIX-compliant
@@ -2001,9 +2004,9 @@ freely available.  The GNU operating
 system kernel (the HURD), has been released but remains in an early
 stage of development.
 
-@cindex Linux
+@cindex Linux @seeentry{GNU/Linux}
 @cindex GNU/Linux
-@cindex operating systems, BSD-based
+@cindex operating systems @subentry BSD-based
 Until the GNU operating system is more fully developed, you should
 consider using GNU/Linux, a freely distributable, Unix-like operating
 system for Intel,
@@ -2167,10 +2170,10 @@ convincing me @emph{not} to title this @value{DOCUMENT}
 @cite{How to Gawk Politely}.
 Karl Berry helped significantly with the @TeX{} part of Texinfo.
 
-@cindex Hartholz, Marshall
-@cindex Hartholz, Elaine
-@cindex Schreiber, Bert
-@cindex Schreiber, Rita
+@cindex Hartholz @subentry Marshall
+@cindex Hartholz @subentry Elaine
+@cindex Schreiber @subentry Bert
+@cindex Schreiber @subentry Rita
 I would like to thank Marshall and Elaine Hartholz of Seattle and
 Dr.@: Bert and Rita Schreiber of Detroit for large amounts of quiet vacation
 time in their homes, which allowed me to make significant progress on
@@ -2284,9 +2287,9 @@ and for being a role model to me for close to 30 years!
 Having him as a reviewer is an exciting privilege. It has also
 been extremely humbling@enddots{}
 
-@cindex Robbins, Miriam
-@cindex Robbins, Jean
-@cindex Robbins, Harry
+@cindex Robbins @subentry Miriam
+@cindex Robbins @subentry Jean
+@cindex Robbins @subentry Harry
 @cindex G-d
 I must thank my wonderful wife, Miriam, for her patience through
 the many versions of this project, for her proofreading,
@@ -2353,7 +2356,7 @@ following chapters:
 @c @cindex rule, definition of
 @c @cindex program, definition of
 @c @cindex basic function of @command{awk}
-@cindex @command{awk}, function of
+@cindex @command{awk} @subentry function of
 
 The basic function of @command{awk} is to search files for lines (or other
 units of text) that contain certain patterns.  When a line matches one
@@ -2361,8 +2364,8 @@ of the patterns, @command{awk} performs specified actions 
on that line.
 @command{awk} continues to process input lines in this way until it reaches
 the end of the input files.
 
-@cindex @command{awk}, uses for
-@cindex programming languages@comma{} data-driven vs.@: procedural
+@cindex @command{awk} @subentry uses for
+@cindex programming languages @subentry data-driven vs.@: procedural
 @cindex @command{awk} programs
 Programs in @command{awk} are different from programs in most other languages,
 because @command{awk} programs are @dfn{data driven} (i.e., you describe
@@ -2415,7 +2418,7 @@ program looks like this:
 @node Running gawk
 @section How to Run @command{awk} Programs
 
-@cindex @command{awk} programs, running
+@cindex @command{awk} programs @subentry running
 There are several ways to run an @command{awk} program.  If the program is
 short, it is easiest to include it in the command that runs @command{awk},
 like this:
@@ -2424,7 +2427,7 @@ like this:
 awk '@var{program}' @var{input-file1} @var{input-file2} @dots{}
 @end example
 
-@cindex command line, formats
+@cindex command line @subentry formats
 When the program is long, it is usually more convenient to put it in a file
 and run it with a command like this:
 
@@ -2473,8 +2476,8 @@ characters.  The quotes also cause the shell to treat all 
of @var{program} as
 a single argument for @command{awk}, and allow @var{program} to be more
 than one line long.
 
-@cindex shells, scripts
-@cindex @command{awk} programs, running, from shell scripts
+@cindex shells @subentry scripts
+@cindex @command{awk} programs @subentry running @subentry from shell scripts
 This format is also useful for running short or medium-sized @command{awk}
 programs from shell scripts, because it avoids the need for a separate
 file for the @command{awk} program.  A self-contained shell script is more
@@ -2492,8 +2495,8 @@ self-contained programs.
 @subsection Running @command{awk} Without Input Files
 
 @cindex standard input
-@cindex input, standard
-@cindex input files, running @command{awk} without
+@cindex input @subentry standard
+@cindex input files @subentry running @command{awk} without
 You can also run @command{awk} without any input files.  If you type the
 following command line:
 
@@ -2507,9 +2510,9 @@ which usually means whatever you type on the keyboard.  
This continues
 until you indicate end-of-file by typing @kbd{Ctrl-d}.
 (On non-POSIX operating systems, the end-of-file character may be different.)
 
-@cindex files, input, See input files
-@cindex input files, running @command{awk} without
-@cindex @command{awk} programs, running, without input files
+@cindex files @subentry input @seeentry{input files}
+@cindex input files @subentry running @command{awk} without
+@cindex @command{awk} programs @subentry running @subentry without input files
 As an example, the following program prints a friendly piece of advice
 (from Douglas Adams's @cite{The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy}),
 to keep you from worrying about the complexities of computer
@@ -2555,9 +2558,9 @@ $ @kbd{awk '@{ print @}'}
 @node Long
 @subsection Running Long Programs
 
-@cindex @command{awk} programs, running
-@cindex @command{awk} programs, lengthy
-@cindex files, @command{awk} programs in
+@cindex @command{awk} programs @subentry running
+@cindex @command{awk} programs @subentry lengthy
+@cindex files @subentry @command{awk} programs in
 Sometimes @command{awk} programs are very long.  In these cases, it is
 more convenient to put the program into a separate file.  In order to tell
 @command{awk} to use that file for its program, you type:
@@ -2567,7 +2570,7 @@ awk -f @var{source-file} @var{input-file1} 
@var{input-file2} @dots{}
 @end example
 
 @cindex @option{-f} option
-@cindex command line, option @option{-f}
+@cindex command line @subentry option @option{-f}
 The @option{-f} instructs the @command{awk} utility to get the
 @command{awk} program from the file @var{source-file} (@pxref{Options}).
 Any @value{FN} can be used for @var{source-file}.  For example, you
@@ -2591,7 +2594,7 @@ does the same thing as this one:
 awk 'BEGIN @{ print "Don\47t Panic!" @}'
 @end example
 
-@cindex quoting, in @command{gawk} command lines
+@cindex quoting @subentry in @command{gawk} command lines
 @noindent
 This was explained earlier
 (@pxref{Read Terminal}).
@@ -2603,8 +2606,8 @@ for programs that are provided on the @command{awk} 
command line.
 (Also, placing the program in a file allows us to use a literal single quote 
in the program
 text, instead of the magic @samp{\47}.)
 
-@cindex single quote (@code{'}) in @command{gawk} command lines
-@cindex @code{'} (single quote) in @command{gawk} command lines
+@cindex single quote (@code{'}) @subentry in @command{gawk} command lines
+@cindex @code{'} (single quote) @subentry in @command{gawk} command lines
 If you want to clearly identify an @command{awk} program file as such,
 you can add the extension @file{.awk} to the @value{FN}.  This doesn't
 affect the execution of the @command{awk} program but it does make
@@ -2613,9 +2616,9 @@ affect the execution of the @command{awk} program but it 
does make
 @node Executable Scripts
 @subsection Executable @command{awk} Programs
 @cindex @command{awk} programs
-@cindex @code{#} (number sign), @code{#!} (executable scripts)
-@cindex Unix, @command{awk} scripts and
-@cindex number sign (@code{#}), @code{#!} (executable scripts)
+@cindex @code{#} (number sign) @subentry @code{#!} (executable scripts)
+@cindex Unix @subentry @command{awk} scripts and
+@cindex number sign (@code{#}) @subentry @code{#!} (executable scripts)
 
 Once you have learned @command{awk}, you may want to write self-contained
 @command{awk} scripts, using the @samp{#!} script mechanism.  You can do
@@ -2650,13 +2653,13 @@ Self-contained @command{awk} scripts are useful when 
you want to write a
 program that users can invoke without their having to know that the program is
 written in @command{awk}.
 
-@cindex sidebar, Understanding @samp{#!}
+@cindex sidebar @subentry Understanding @samp{#!}
 @ifdocbook
 @docbook
 <sidebar><title>Understanding @samp{#!}</title>
 @end docbook
 
-@cindex portability, @code{#!} (executable scripts)
+@cindex portability @subentry @code{#!} (executable scripts)
 
 @command{awk} is an @dfn{interpreted} language. This means that the
 @command{awk} utility reads your program and then processes your data
@@ -2685,9 +2688,9 @@ treats the rest of the line as a single argument and 
passes it to @command{awk}.
 Doing this leads to confusing behavior---most likely a usage diagnostic
 of some sort from @command{awk}.
 
-@cindex @code{ARGC}/@code{ARGV} variables, portability and
-@cindex portability, @code{ARGV} variable
-@cindex dark corner, @code{ARGV} variable, value of
+@cindex @code{ARGC}/@code{ARGV} variables @subentry portability and
+@cindex portability @subentry @code{ARGV} variable
+@cindex dark corner @subentry @code{ARGV} variable, value of
 Finally, the value of @code{ARGV[0]}
 (@pxref{Built-in Variables})
 varies depending upon your operating system.
@@ -2707,7 +2710,7 @@ to provide your script name.
 @center @b{Understanding @samp{#!}}
 
 
-@cindex portability, @code{#!} (executable scripts)
+@cindex portability @subentry @code{#!} (executable scripts)
 
 @command{awk} is an @dfn{interpreted} language. This means that the
 @command{awk} utility reads your program and then processes your data
@@ -2736,9 +2739,9 @@ treats the rest of the line as a single argument and 
passes it to @command{awk}.
 Doing this leads to confusing behavior---most likely a usage diagnostic
 of some sort from @command{awk}.
 
-@cindex @code{ARGC}/@code{ARGV} variables, portability and
-@cindex portability, @code{ARGV} variable
-@cindex dark corner, @code{ARGV} variable, value of
+@cindex @code{ARGC}/@code{ARGV} variables @subentry portability and
+@cindex portability @subentry @code{ARGV} variable
+@cindex dark corner @subentry @code{ARGV} variable, value of
 Finally, the value of @code{ARGV[0]}
 (@pxref{Built-in Variables})
 varies depending upon your operating system.
@@ -2752,10 +2755,10 @@ to provide your script name.
 
 @node Comments
 @subsection Comments in @command{awk} Programs
-@cindex @code{#} (number sign), commenting
-@cindex number sign (@code{#}), commenting
+@cindex @code{#} (number sign) @subentry commenting
+@cindex number sign (@code{#}) @subentry commenting
 @cindex commenting
-@cindex @command{awk} programs, documenting
+@cindex @command{awk} programs @subentry documenting
 
 A @dfn{comment} is some text that is included in a program for the sake
 of human readers; it is not really an executable part of the program.  Comments
@@ -2780,9 +2783,9 @@ programs, but this usually isn't very useful; the purpose 
of a
 comment is to help you or another person understand the program
 when reading it at a later time.
 
-@cindex quoting, for small awk programs
-@cindex single quote (@code{'}), vs.@: apostrophe
-@cindex @code{'} (single quote), vs.@: apostrophe
+@cindex quoting @subentry for small awk programs
+@cindex single quote (@code{'}) @subentry vs.@: apostrophe
+@cindex @code{'} (single quote) @subentry vs.@: apostrophe
 @quotation CAUTION
 As mentioned in
 @ref{One-shot},
@@ -2838,7 +2841,7 @@ the shell prompt, or writing it as part of a larger shell 
script:
 awk '@var{program text}' @var{input-file1} @var{input-file2} @dots{}
 @end example
 
-@cindex shells, quoting, rules for
+@cindex shells @subentry quoting @subentry rules for
 @cindex Bourne shell, quoting rules for
 Once you are working with the shell, it is helpful to have a basic
 knowledge of shell quoting rules.  The following rules apply only to
@@ -2877,10 +2880,10 @@ that character.  The shell removes the backslash and 
passes the quoted
 character on to the command.
 
 @item
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), in shell commands
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), in shell commands
-@cindex single quote (@code{'}), in shell commands
-@cindex @code{'} (single quote), in shell commands
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry in shell commands
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry in shell commands
+@cindex single quote (@code{'}) @subentry in shell commands
+@cindex @code{'} (single quote) @subentry in shell commands
 Single quotes protect everything between the opening and closing quotes.
 The shell does no interpretation of the quoted text, passing it on verbatim
 to the command.
@@ -2890,8 +2893,8 @@ Refer back to
 for an example of what happens if you try.
 
 @item
-@cindex double quote (@code{"}), in shell commands
-@cindex @code{"} (double quote), in shell commands
+@cindex double quote (@code{"}) @subentry in shell commands
+@cindex @code{"} (double quote) @subentry in shell commands
 Double quotes protect most things between the opening and closing quotes.
 The shell does at least variable and command substitution on the quoted text.
 Different shells may do additional kinds of processing on double-quoted text.
@@ -2919,8 +2922,8 @@ $ @kbd{awk "BEGIN @{ print \"Don't Panic!\" @}"}
 @print{} Don't Panic!
 @end example
 
-@cindex single quote (@code{'}), with double quotes
-@cindex @code{'} (single quote), with double quotes
+@cindex single quote (@code{'}) @subentry with double quotes
+@cindex @code{'} (single quote) @subentry with double quotes
 Note that the single quote is not special within double quotes.
 
 @item
@@ -2934,7 +2937,7 @@ awk -F "" '@var{program}' @var{files} # correct
 @end example
 
 @noindent
-@cindex null strings in @command{gawk} arguments, quoting and
+@cindex null strings @subentry in @command{gawk} arguments, quoting and
 Don't use this:
 
 @example
@@ -2947,7 +2950,7 @@ as the value of @code{FS}, and the first @value{FN} as 
the text of the program!
 This results in syntax errors at best, and confusing behavior at worst.
 @end itemize
 
-@cindex quoting, in @command{gawk} command lines, tricks for
+@cindex quoting @subentry in @command{gawk} command lines @subentry tricks for
 Mixing single and double quotes is difficult.  You have to resort
 to shell quoting tricks, like this:
 
@@ -3109,7 +3112,7 @@ double-quote don't need duplication.
 @node Sample Data Files
 @section @value{DDF}s for the Examples
 
-@cindex input files, examples
+@cindex input files @subentry examples
 @cindex @code{mail-list} file
 Many of the examples in this @value{DOCUMENT} take their input from two sample
 @value{DF}s.  The first, @file{mail-list}, represents a list of peoples' names
@@ -3222,21 +3225,21 @@ $ @kbd{awk '/li/ @{ print $0 @}' mail-list}
 @print{} Samuel       555-3430     samuel.lanceolis@@shu.edu        A
 @end example
 
-@cindex actions, default
-@cindex patterns, default
+@cindex actions @subentry default
+@cindex patterns @subentry default
 In an @command{awk} rule, either the pattern or the action can be omitted,
 but not both.  If the pattern is omitted, then the action is performed
 for @emph{every} input line.  If the action is omitted, the default
 action is to print all lines that match the pattern.
 
-@cindex actions, empty
+@cindex actions @subentry empty
 Thus, we could leave out the action (the @code{print} statement and the
 braces) in the previous example and the result would be the same:
 @command{awk} prints all lines matching the pattern @samp{li}.  By comparison,
 omitting the @code{print} statement but retaining the braces makes an
 empty action that does nothing (i.e., no lines are printed).
 
-@cindex @command{awk} programs, one-line examples
+@cindex @command{awk} programs @subentry one-line examples
 Many practical @command{awk} programs are just a line or two long.  Following 
is a
 collection of useful, short programs to get you started.  Some of these
 programs contain constructs that haven't been covered yet. (The description
@@ -3441,7 +3444,7 @@ the file was last modified. Its output looks like this:
 @end example
 
 @noindent
-@cindex line continuations, with C shell
+@cindex line continuations @subentry with C shell
 The first field contains read-write permissions, the second field contains
 the number of links to the file, and the third field identifies the file's 
owner.
 The fourth field identifies the file's group.
@@ -3487,7 +3490,7 @@ awk '/12/  @{ print $0 @}
      /21/  @{ print $0 @}' mail-list inventory-shipped
 @end example
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, newlines in
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry newlines in
 However, @command{gawk} ignores newlines after any of the following
 symbols and keywords:
 
@@ -3504,8 +3507,8 @@ Splitting lines after @samp{?} and @samp{:} is a minor 
@command{gawk}
 extension; if @option{--posix} is specified
 (@pxref{Options}), then this extension is disabled.}
 
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), continuing lines and
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), continuing lines and
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry continuing lines and
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry continuing lines and
 If you would like to split a single statement into two lines at a point
 where a newline would terminate it, you can @dfn{continue} it by ending the
 first line with a backslash character (@samp{\}).  The backslash must be
@@ -3519,7 +3522,7 @@ awk '/This regular expression is too long, so continue it\
 @end example
 
 @noindent
-@cindex portability, backslash continuation and
+@cindex portability @subentry backslash continuation and
 We have generally not used backslash continuation in our sample programs.
 @command{gawk} places no limit on the
 length of a line, so backslash continuation is never strictly necessary;
@@ -3537,8 +3540,8 @@ lines in the middle of a regular expression or a string.
 @c solaris 2.7 nawk does not. Solaris /usr/xpg4/bin/awk does though!  sigh.
 
 @cindex @command{csh} utility
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), continuing lines and, in @command{csh}
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), continuing lines and, in @command{csh}
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry continuing lines and @subentry in 
@command{csh}
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry continuing lines and @subentry in 
@command{csh}
 @quotation CAUTION
 @emph{Backslash continuation does not work as described
 with the C shell.}  It works for @command{awk} programs in files and
@@ -3576,9 +3579,9 @@ begin on the same line as the pattern.  To have the 
pattern and action
 on separate lines, you @emph{must} use backslash continuation; there
 is no other option.
 
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), continuing lines and, comments and
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), continuing lines and, comments and
-@cindex commenting, backslash continuation and
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry continuing lines and @subentry comments 
and
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry continuing lines and @subentry comments 
and
+@cindex commenting @subentry backslash continuation and
 Another thing to keep in mind is that backslash continuation and
 comments do not mix. As soon as @command{awk} sees the @samp{#} that
 starts a comment, it ignores @emph{everything} on the rest of the
@@ -3600,11 +3603,11 @@ next line. However, the backslash-newline combination 
is never even
 noticed because it is ``hidden'' inside the comment. Thus, the
 @code{BEGIN} is noted as a syntax error.
 
-@cindex statements, multiple
-@cindex @code{;} (semicolon), separating statements in actions
-@cindex semicolon (@code{;}), separating statements in actions
-@cindex @code{;} (semicolon), separating rules
-@cindex semicolon (@code{;}), separating rules
+@cindex statements @subentry multiple
+@cindex @code{;} (semicolon) @subentry separating statements in actions
+@cindex semicolon (@code{;}) @subentry separating statements in actions
+@cindex @code{;} (semicolon) @subentry separating rules
+@cindex semicolon (@code{;}) @subentry separating rules
 When @command{awk} statements within one rule are short, you might want to put
 more than one of them on a line.  This is accomplished by separating the 
statements
 with a semicolon (@samp{;}).
@@ -3647,7 +3650,7 @@ systematically in @ref{Built-in Variables} and in
 @node When
 @section When to Use @command{awk}
 
-@cindex @command{awk}, uses for
+@cindex @command{awk} @subentry uses for
 Now that you've seen some of what @command{awk} can do,
 you might wonder how @command{awk} could be useful for you.  By using
 utility programs, advanced patterns, field separators, arithmetic
@@ -3678,7 +3681,7 @@ computer.
 The original @command{awk}'s capabilities were strained by tasks
 of such complexity, but modern versions are more capable.
 
-@cindex @command{awk} programs, complex
+@cindex @command{awk} programs @subentry complex
 If you find yourself writing @command{awk} scripts of more than, say,
 a few hundred lines, you might consider using a different programming
 language.  The shell is good at string and pattern matching; in addition,
@@ -3758,10 +3761,10 @@ things in this @value{CHAPTER} that don't interest you 
right now.
 
 @node Command Line
 @section Invoking @command{awk}
-@cindex command line, invoking @command{awk} from
-@cindex @command{awk}, invoking
-@cindex arguments, command-line, invoking @command{awk}
-@cindex options, command-line, invoking @command{awk}
+@cindex command line @subentry invoking @command{awk} from
+@cindex @command{awk} @subentry invoking
+@cindex arguments @subentry command-line @subentry invoking @command{awk}
+@cindex options @subentry command-line @subentry invoking @command{awk}
 
 There are two ways to run @command{awk}---with an explicit program or with
 one or more program files.  Here are templates for both of them; items
@@ -3774,12 +3777,12 @@ enclosed in [@dots{}] in these templates are optional:
 
 @cindex GNU long options
 @cindex long options
-@cindex options, long
+@cindex options @subentry long
 In addition to traditional one-letter POSIX-style options, @command{gawk} also
 supports GNU long options.
 
-@cindex dark corner, invoking @command{awk}
-@cindex lint checking, empty programs
+@cindex dark corner @subentry invoking @command{awk}
+@cindex lint checking @subentry empty programs
 It is possible to invoke @command{awk} with an empty program:
 
 @example
@@ -3787,7 +3790,7 @@ awk '' datafile1 datafile2
 @end example
 
 @cindex @option{--lint} option
-@cindex dark corner, empty programs
+@cindex dark corner @subentry empty programs
 @noindent
 Doing so makes little sense, though; @command{awk} exits
 silently when given an empty program.
@@ -3798,10 +3801,10 @@ warning that the program is empty.
 
 @node Options
 @section Command-Line Options
-@cindex options, command-line
-@cindex command line, options
+@cindex options @subentry command-line
+@cindex command line @subentry options
 @cindex GNU long options
-@cindex options, long
+@cindex options @subentry long
 
 Options begin with a dash and consist of a single character.
 GNU-style long options consist of two dashes and a keyword.
@@ -3813,7 +3816,7 @@ by whitespace.
 If a particular option with a value is given more than once, it is the
 last value that counts.
 
-@cindex POSIX @command{awk}, GNU long options and
+@cindex POSIX @command{awk} @subentry GNU long options and
 Each long option for @command{gawk} has a corresponding
 POSIX-style short option.
 The long and short options are
@@ -3825,7 +3828,7 @@ The following list describes options mandated by the 
POSIX standard:
 @itemx --field-separator @var{fs}
 @cindex @option{-F} option
 @cindex @option{--field-separator} option
-@cindex @code{FS} variable, @code{--field-separator} option and
+@cindex @code{FS} variable @subentry @code{--field-separator} option and
 Set the @code{FS} variable to @var{fs}
 (@pxref{Field Separators}).
 
@@ -3833,7 +3836,7 @@ Set the @code{FS} variable to @var{fs}
 @itemx --file @var{source-file}
 @cindex @option{-f} option
 @cindex @option{--file} option
-@cindex @command{awk} programs, location of
+@cindex @command{awk} programs @subentry location of
 Read the @command{awk} program source from @var{source-file}
 instead of in the first nonoption argument.
 This option may be given multiple times; the @command{awk}
@@ -3847,7 +3850,7 @@ at their beginning. @xref{Changing The Namespace}, for 
more information.
 @itemx --assign @var{var}=@var{val}
 @cindex @option{-v} option
 @cindex @option{--assign} option
-@cindex variables, setting
+@cindex variables @subentry setting
 Set the variable @var{var} to the value @var{val} @emph{before}
 execution of the program begins.  Such variable values are available
 inside the @code{BEGIN} rule
@@ -3857,8 +3860,8 @@ The @option{-v} option can only set one variable, but it 
can be used
 more than once, setting another variable each time, like this:
 @samp{awk @w{-v foo=1} @w{-v bar=2} @dots{}}.
 
-@cindex predefined variables, @code{-v} option@comma{} setting with
-@cindex variables, predefined, @code{-v} option@comma{} setting with
+@cindex predefined variables @subentry @code{-v} option, setting with
+@cindex variables @subentry predefined @subentry @code{-v} option, setting with
 @quotation CAUTION
 Using @option{-v} to set the values of the built-in
 variables may lead to surprising results.  @command{awk} will reset the
@@ -3877,15 +3880,15 @@ the abbreviations remain unique.
 The full list of @command{gawk}-specific options is provided next.
 
 @item --
-@cindex command line, options, end of
-@cindex options, command-line, end of
+@cindex command line @subentry options @subentry end of
+@cindex options @subentry command-line @subentry end of
 Signal the end of the command-line options.  The following arguments
 are not treated as options even if they begin with @samp{-}.  This
 interpretation of @option{--} follows the POSIX argument parsing
 conventions.
 
-@cindex @code{-} (hyphen), file names beginning with
-@cindex hyphen (@code{-}), file names beginning with
+@cindex @code{-} (hyphen) @subentry file names beginning with
+@cindex hyphen (@code{-}) @subentry file names beginning with
 This is useful if you have @value{FN}s that start with @samp{-},
 or in shell scripts, if you have @value{FN}s that will be specified
 by the user that could start with @samp{-}.
@@ -3916,7 +3919,7 @@ multibyte characters. This option is an easy way to tell 
@command{gawk},
 @itemx @option{--traditional}
 @cindex @option{-c} option
 @cindex @option{--traditional} option
-@cindex compatibility mode (@command{gawk}), specifying
+@cindex compatibility mode (@command{gawk}) @subentry specifying
 Specify @dfn{compatibility mode}, in which the GNU extensions to
 the @command{awk} language are disabled, so that @command{gawk} behaves just
 like BWK @command{awk}.
@@ -3931,7 +3934,7 @@ Also see
 @itemx @option{--copyright}
 @cindex @option{-C} option
 @cindex @option{--copyright} option
-@cindex GPL (General Public License), printing
+@cindex GPL (General Public License) @subentry printing
 Print the short version of the General Public License and then exit.
 
 @item @option{-d}[@var{file}]
@@ -3940,15 +3943,15 @@ Print the short version of the General Public License 
and then exit.
 @cindex @option{--dump-variables} option
 @cindex dump all variables of a program
 @cindex @file{awkvars.out} file
-@cindex files, @file{awkvars.out}
-@cindex variables, global, printing list of
+@cindex files @subentry @file{awkvars.out}
+@cindex variables @subentry global @subentry printing list of
 Print a sorted list of global variables, their types, and final values
 to @var{file}.  If no @var{file} is provided, print this
 list to a file named @file{awkvars.out} in the current directory.
 No space is allowed between the @option{-d} and @var{file}, if
 @var{file} is supplied.
 
-@cindex troubleshooting, typographical errors@comma{} global variables
+@cindex troubleshooting @subentry typographical errors, global variables
 Having a list of all global variables is a good way to look for
 typographical errors in your programs.
 You would also use this option if you have a large program with a lot of
@@ -3961,7 +3964,7 @@ names like @code{i}, @code{j}, etc.)
 @itemx @option{--debug}[@code{=}@var{file}]
 @cindex @option{-D} option
 @cindex @option{--debug} option
-@cindex @command{awk} debugging, enabling
+@cindex @command{awk} programs @subentry debugging, enabling
 Enable debugging of @command{awk} programs
 (@pxref{Debugging}).
 By default, the debugger reads commands interactively from the keyboard
@@ -3975,7 +3978,7 @@ No space is allowed between the @option{-D} and 
@var{file}, if
 @itemx @option{--source} @var{program-text}
 @cindex @option{-e} option
 @cindex @option{--source} option
-@cindex source code, mixing
+@cindex source code @subentry mixing
 Provide program source code in the @var{program-text}.
 This option allows you to mix source code in files with source
 code that you enter on the command line.
@@ -4010,7 +4013,7 @@ for more information.
 @itemx @option{--exec} @var{file}
 @cindex @option{-E} option
 @cindex @option{--exec} option
-@cindex @command{awk} programs, location of
+@cindex @command{awk} programs @subentry location of
 @cindex CGI, @command{awk} scripts for
 Similar to @option{-f}, read @command{awk} program text from @var{file}.
 There are two differences from @option{-f}:
@@ -4047,8 +4050,8 @@ with @samp{#!} scripts (@pxref{Executable Scripts}), like 
so:
 @itemx @option{--gen-pot}
 @cindex @option{-g} option
 @cindex @option{--gen-pot} option
-@cindex portable object files, generating
-@cindex files, portable object, generating
+@cindex portable object @subentry files @subentry generating
+@cindex files @subentry portable object @subentry generating
 Analyze the source program and
 generate a GNU @command{gettext} portable object template file on standard
 output for all string constants that have been marked for translation.
@@ -4059,9 +4062,9 @@ for information about this option.
 @itemx @option{--help}
 @cindex @option{-h} option
 @cindex @option{--help} option
-@cindex GNU long options, printing list of
-@cindex options, printing list of
-@cindex printing, list of options
+@cindex GNU long options @subentry printing list of
+@cindex options @subentry printing list of
+@cindex printing @subentry list of options
 Print a ``usage'' message summarizing the short- and long-style options
 that @command{gawk} accepts and then exit.
 
@@ -4069,7 +4072,7 @@ that @command{gawk} accepts and then exit.
 @itemx @option{--include} @var{source-file}
 @cindex @option{-i} option
 @cindex @option{--include} option
-@cindex @command{awk} programs, location of
+@cindex @command{awk} programs @subentry location of
 Read an @command{awk} source library from @var{source-file}.  This option
 is completely equivalent to using the @code{@@include} directive inside
 your program.  It is very similar to the @option{-f} option,
@@ -4089,7 +4092,7 @@ at their beginning.  @xref{Changing The Namespace}, for 
more information.
 @itemx @option{--load} @var{ext}
 @cindex @option{-l} option
 @cindex @option{--load} option
-@cindex loading, extensions
+@cindex loading extensions
 Load a dynamic extension named @var{ext}. Extensions
 are stored as system shared libraries.
 This option searches for the library using the @env{AWKLIBPATH}
@@ -4103,7 +4106,7 @@ a shared library.  This advanced feature is described in 
detail in @ref{Dynamic
 @itemx @option{--lint}[@code{=}@var{value}]
 @cindex @option{-l} option
 @cindex @option{--lint} option
-@cindex lint checking, issuing warnings
+@cindex lint checking @subentry issuing warnings
 @cindex warnings, issuing
 Warn about constructs that are dubious or nonportable to
 other @command{awk} implementations.
@@ -4138,9 +4141,9 @@ if @command{gawk} is not compiled to use the GNU MPFR and 
MP libraries
 @itemx @option{--non-decimal-data}
 @cindex @option{-n} option
 @cindex @option{--non-decimal-data} option
-@cindex hexadecimal values@comma{} enabling interpretation of
-@cindex octal values@comma{} enabling interpretation of
-@cindex troubleshooting, @code{--non-decimal-data} option
+@cindex hexadecimal values, enabling interpretation of
+@cindex octal values, enabling interpretation of
+@cindex troubleshooting @subentry @code{--non-decimal-data} option
 Enable automatic interpretation of octal and hexadecimal
 values in input data
 (@pxref{Nondecimal Data}).
@@ -4193,7 +4196,7 @@ be used to cancel the effect of an earlier @option{-s} 
option
 @itemx @option{--profile}[@code{=}@var{file}]
 @cindex @option{-p} option
 @cindex @option{--profile} option
-@cindex @command{awk} profiling, enabling
+@cindex @command{awk} @subentry profiling, enabling
 Enable profiling of @command{awk} programs
 (@pxref{Profiling}).
 Implies @option{--no-optimize}.
@@ -4211,7 +4214,7 @@ in the left margin, and function call counts for each 
function.
 @cindex @option{-P} option
 @cindex @option{--posix} option
 @cindex POSIX mode
-@cindex @command{gawk}, extensions@comma{} disabling
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry extensions, disabling
 Operate in strict POSIX mode.  This disables all @command{gawk}
 extensions (just like @option{--traditional}) and
 disables all extensions not allowed by POSIX.
@@ -4224,13 +4227,13 @@ restrictions apply:
 @itemize @value{BULLET}
 
 @cindex newlines
-@cindex whitespace, newlines as
+@cindex whitespace @subentry newlines as
 @item
 Newlines are not allowed after @samp{?} or @samp{:}
 (@pxref{Conditional Exp}).
 
 
-@cindex @code{FS} variable, TAB character as
+@cindex @code{FS} variable @subentry TAB character as
 @item
 Specifying @samp{-Ft} on the command line does not set the value
 of @code{FS} to be a single TAB character
@@ -4245,8 +4248,8 @@ data (@pxref{Locales}).
 
 @c @cindex automatic warnings
 @c @cindex warnings, automatic
-@cindex @option{--traditional} option, @code{--posix} option and
-@cindex @option{--posix} option, @code{--traditional} option and
+@cindex @option{--traditional} option @subentry @code{--posix} option and
+@cindex @option{--posix} option @subentry @code{--traditional} option and
 If you supply both @option{--traditional} and @option{--posix} on the
 command line, @option{--posix} takes precedence. @command{gawk}
 issues a warning if both options are supplied.
@@ -4255,7 +4258,7 @@ issues a warning if both options are supplied.
 @itemx @option{--re-interval}
 @cindex @option{-r} option
 @cindex @option{--re-interval} option
-@cindex regular expressions, interval expressions and
+@cindex regular expressions @subentry interval expressions and
 Allow interval expressions
 (@pxref{Regexp Operators})
 in regexps.
@@ -4298,27 +4301,34 @@ Warn about constructs that are not available in the 
original version of
 @itemx @option{--version}
 @cindex @option{-V} option
 @cindex @option{--version} option
-@cindex @command{gawk}, versions of, information about@comma{} printing
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry version of @subentry printing information 
about
 Print version information for this particular copy of @command{gawk}.
 This allows you to determine if your copy of @command{gawk} is up to date
 with respect to whatever the Free Software Foundation is currently
 distributing.
 It is also useful for bug reports
 (@pxref{Bugs}).
+
+@cindex @code{-} (hyphen) @subentry @code{--} end of options marker
+@cindex hyphen (@code{-}) @subentry @code{--} end of options marker
+@item @code{--}
+Mark the end of all options.
+Any command-line arguments following @code{--} are placed in @code{ARGV},
+even if they start with a minus sign.
 @end table
 
 As long as program text has been supplied,
 any other options are flagged as invalid with a warning message but
 are otherwise ignored.
 
-@cindex @option{-F} option, @option{-Ft} sets @code{FS} to TAB
+@cindex @option{-F} option @subentry @option{-Ft} sets @code{FS} to TAB
 In compatibility mode, as a special case, if the value of @var{fs} supplied
 to the @option{-F} option is @samp{t}, then @code{FS} is set to the TAB
 character (@code{"\t"}).  This is true only for @option{--traditional} and not
 for @option{--posix}
 (@pxref{Field Separators}).
 
-@cindex @option{-f} option, multiple uses
+@cindex @option{-f} option @subentry multiple uses
 The @option{-f} option may be used more than once on the command line.
 If it is, @command{awk} reads its program source from all of the named files, 
as
 if they had been concatenated together into one big file.  This is
@@ -4355,7 +4365,8 @@ the command line that follow the program text are entered 
into the
 command line looking for options.
 
 @cindex @env{POSIXLY_CORRECT} environment variable
-@cindex lint checking, @env{POSIXLY_CORRECT} environment variable
+@cindex environment variables @subentry @env{POSIXLY_CORRECT}
+@cindex lint checking @subentry @env{POSIXLY_CORRECT} environment variable
 @cindex POSIX mode
 If the environment variable @env{POSIXLY_CORRECT} exists,
 then @command{gawk} behaves in strict POSIX mode, exactly as if
@@ -4377,7 +4388,7 @@ POSIXLY_CORRECT=true
 export POSIXLY_CORRECT
 @end example
 
-@cindex @command{csh} utility, @env{POSIXLY_CORRECT} environment variable
+@cindex @command{csh} utility @subentry @env{POSIXLY_CORRECT} environment 
variable
 For a C shell-compatible
 shell,@footnote{Not recommended.}
 you would add this line to the @file{.login} file in your home directory:
@@ -4386,15 +4397,15 @@ you would add this line to the @file{.login} file in 
your home directory:
 setenv POSIXLY_CORRECT true
 @end example
 
-@cindex portability, @env{POSIXLY_CORRECT} environment variable
+@cindex portability @subentry @env{POSIXLY_CORRECT} environment variable
 Having @env{POSIXLY_CORRECT} set is not recommended for daily use,
 but it is good for testing the portability of your programs to other
 environments.
 
 @node Other Arguments
 @section Other Command-Line Arguments
-@cindex command line, arguments
-@cindex arguments, command-line
+@cindex command line @subentry arguments
+@cindex arguments @subentry command-line
 
 Any additional arguments on the command line are normally treated as
 input files to be processed in the order specified.   However, an
@@ -4416,10 +4427,10 @@ a variable assignment), precede the file name with 
@samp{./}, like so:
 awk -f program.awk file1 ./count=1 file2
 @end example
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, @code{ARGIND} variable in
-@cindex @code{ARGIND} variable, command-line arguments
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry @code{ARGIND} variable in
+@cindex @code{ARGIND} variable @subentry command-line arguments
 @cindex @code{ARGV} array, indexing into
-@cindex @code{ARGC}/@code{ARGV} variables, command-line arguments
+@cindex @code{ARGC}/@code{ARGV} variables @subentry command-line arguments
 All the command-line arguments are made available to your @command{awk} 
program in the
 @code{ARGV} array (@pxref{Built-in Variables}).  Command-line options
 and the program text (if present) are omitted from @code{ARGV}.
@@ -4433,7 +4444,7 @@ Changing @code{ARGC} and @code{ARGV} in your 
@command{awk} program lets
 you control how @command{awk} processes the input files; this is described
 in more detail in @ref{ARGC and ARGV}.
 
-@cindex input files, variable assignments and
+@cindex input files @subentry variable assignments and
 @cindex variable assignments and input files
 The distinction between @value{FN} arguments and variable-assignment
 arguments is made when @command{awk} is about to open the next input file.
@@ -4448,7 +4459,7 @@ variables assigned in this fashion are @emph{not} 
available inside a
 (@pxref{BEGIN/END}),
 because such rules are run before @command{awk} begins scanning the argument 
list.
 
-@cindex dark corner, escape sequences
+@cindex dark corner @subentry escape sequences
 The variable values given on the command line are processed for escape
 sequences (@pxref{Escape Sequences}).
 @value{DARKCORNER}
@@ -4469,7 +4480,7 @@ output formats, before scanning the @value{DF}s.  It is 
also useful for
 controlling state if multiple passes are needed over a @value{DF}.  For
 example:
 
-@cindex files, multiple passes over
+@cindex files @subentry multiple passes over
 @example
 awk 'pass == 1  @{ @var{pass 1 stuff} @}
      pass == 2  @{ @var{pass 2 stuff} @}' pass=1 mydata pass=2 mydata
@@ -4514,7 +4525,7 @@ this @value{FN} itself.)
 
 @node Environment Variables
 @section The Environment Variables @command{gawk} Uses
-@cindex environment variables used by @command{gawk}
+@cindex environment variables @subentry used by @command{gawk}
 
 A number of environment variables influence how @command{gawk}
 behaves.
@@ -4530,9 +4541,10 @@ behaves.
 @node AWKPATH Variable
 @subsection The @env{AWKPATH} Environment Variable
 @cindex @env{AWKPATH} environment variable
-@cindex directories, searching for source files
-@cindex search paths, for source files
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, @env{AWKPATH} 
environment variable
+@cindex environment variables @subentry @env{AWKPATH}
+@cindex directories @subentry searching @subentry for source files
+@cindex search paths @subentry for source files
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry 
@env{AWKPATH} environment variable
 @ifinfo
 The previous @value{SECTION} described how @command{awk} program files can be 
named
 on the command line with the @option{-f} option.
@@ -4616,9 +4628,10 @@ found, and @command{gawk} no longer needs to use 
@env{AWKPATH}.
 @node AWKLIBPATH Variable
 @subsection The @env{AWKLIBPATH} Environment Variable
 @cindex @env{AWKLIBPATH} environment variable
-@cindex directories, searching for loadable extensions
-@cindex search paths, for loadable extensions
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, @code{AWKLIBPATH} 
environment variable
+@cindex environment variables @subentry @env{AWKLIBPATH}
+@cindex directories @subentry searching @subentry for loadable extensions
+@cindex search paths @subentry for loadable extensions
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry 
@code{AWKLIBPATH} environment variable
 
 The @env{AWKLIBPATH} environment variable is similar to the @env{AWKPATH}
 variable, but it is used to search for loadable extensions (stored as
@@ -4772,9 +4785,11 @@ to @code{EXIT_FAILURE}.
 
 This @value{SECTION} describes a feature that is specific to @command{gawk}.
 
-@cindex @code{@@include} directive
+@cindex @code{@@} (at-sign) @subentry @code{@@include} directive
+@cindex at-sign (@code{@@}) @subentry @code{@@include} directive
 @cindex file inclusion, @code{@@include} directive
 @cindex including files, @code{@@include} directive
+@cindex @code{@@include} directive @sortas{include directive}
 The @code{@@include} keyword can be used to read external @command{awk} source
 files.  This gives you the ability to split large @command{awk} source files
 into smaller, more manageable pieces, and also lets you reuse common 
@command{awk}
@@ -4900,9 +4915,11 @@ at their beginning.  @xref{Changing The Namespace}, for 
more information.
 
 This @value{SECTION} describes a feature that is specific to @command{gawk}.
 
-@cindex @code{@@load} directive
-@cindex loading extensions, @code{@@load} directive
-@cindex extensions, loading, @code{@@load} directive
+@cindex @code{@@} (at-sign) @subentry @code{@@load} directive
+@cindex at-sign (@code{@@}) @subentry @code{@@load} directive
+@cindex loading extensions @subentry @code{@@load} directive
+@cindex extensions @subentry loadable @subentry loading, @code{@@load} 
directive
+@cindex @code{@@load} directive @sortas{load directive}
 The @code{@@load} keyword can be used to read external @command{awk} extensions
 (stored as system shared libraries).
 This allows you to link in compiled code that may offer superior
@@ -4945,8 +4962,8 @@ It also describes the @code{ordchr} extension.
 
 @c update this section for each release!
 
-@cindex options, deprecated
-@cindex features, deprecated
+@cindex options @subentry deprecated
+@cindex features @subentry deprecated
 @cindex obsolete features
 This @value{SECTION} describes features and/or command-line options from
 previous releases of @command{gawk} that either are not available in the
@@ -4968,7 +4985,7 @@ in case some option becomes obsolete in a future version 
of @command{gawk}.
 @node Undocumented
 @section Undocumented Options and Features
 @cindex undocumented features
-@cindex features, undocumented
+@cindex features @subentry undocumented
 @cindex Skywalker, Luke
 @cindex Kenobi, Obi-Wan
 @cindex jedi knights
@@ -4978,7 +4995,7 @@ in case some option becomes obsolete in a future version 
of @command{gawk}.
 @author Obi-Wan
 @end quotation
 
-@cindex shells, sea
+@cindex shells @subentry sea
 This @value{SECTION} intentionally left
 blank.
 
@@ -5162,8 +5179,8 @@ set of strings.
 Because regular expressions are such a fundamental part of @command{awk}
 programming, their format and use deserve a separate @value{CHAPTER}.
 
-@cindex forward slash (@code{/}) to enclose regular expressions
-@cindex @code{/} (forward slash) to enclose regular expressions
+@cindex forward slash (@code{/}) @subentry to enclose regular expressions
+@cindex @code{/} (forward slash) @subentry to enclose regular expressions
 A regular expression enclosed in slashes (@samp{/})
 is an @command{awk} pattern that matches every input record whose text
 belongs to that set.
@@ -5195,8 +5212,8 @@ regular expressions work, we present more complicated 
instances.
 @node Regexp Usage
 @section How to Use Regular Expressions
 
-@cindex patterns, regular expressions as
-@cindex regular expressions, as patterns
+@cindex patterns @subentry regexp constants as
+@cindex regular expressions @subentry as patterns
 A regular expression can be used as a pattern by enclosing it in
 slashes.  Then the regular expression is tested against the
 entire text of each record.  (Normally, it only needs
@@ -5212,18 +5229,18 @@ $ @kbd{awk '/li/ @{ print $2 @}' mail-list}
 @print{} 555-3430
 @end example
 
-@cindex regular expressions, operators
-@cindex operators, string-matching
+@cindex regular expressions @subentry operators
+@cindex operators @subentry string-matching
 @c @cindex operators, @code{~}
 @cindex string-matching operators
 @cindex @code{~} (tilde), @code{~} operator
 @cindex tilde (@code{~}), @code{~} operator
-@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point), @code{!~} operator
-@cindex exclamation point (@code{!}), @code{!~} operator
+@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point) @subentry @code{!~} operator
+@cindex exclamation point (@code{!}) @subentry @code{!~} operator
 @c @cindex operators, @code{!~}
-@cindex @code{if} statement, use of regexps in
-@cindex @code{while} statement, use of regexps in
-@cindex @code{do}-@code{while} statement, use of regexps in
+@cindex @code{if} statement @subentry use of regexps in
+@cindex @code{while} statement @subentry use of regexps in
+@cindex @code{do}-@code{while} statement @subentry use of regexps in
 @c @cindex statements, @code{if}
 @c @cindex statements, @code{while}
 @c @cindex statements, @code{do}
@@ -5281,8 +5298,8 @@ $ @kbd{awk '$1 !~ /J/' inventory-shipped}
 @end example
 
 @cindex regexp constants
-@cindex constant regexps
-@cindex regular expressions, constants, See regexp constants
+@cindex constants @subentry regexp
+@cindex regular expressions, constants @seeentry{regexp constants}
 When a regexp is enclosed in slashes, such as @code{/foo/}, we call it
 a @dfn{regexp constant}, much like @code{5.27} is a numeric constant and
 @code{"foo"} is a string constant.
@@ -5290,9 +5307,10 @@ a @dfn{regexp constant}, much like @code{5.27} is a 
numeric constant and
 @node Escape Sequences
 @section Escape Sequences
 
-@cindex escape sequences, in strings
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), in escape sequences
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), in escape sequences
+@cindex escape sequences
+@cindex escape sequences @seealso{backslash}
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry in escape sequences
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry in escape sequences
 Some characters cannot be included literally in string constants
 (@code{"foo"}) or regexp constants (@code{/foo/}).
 Instead, they should be represented with @dfn{escape sequences},
@@ -5322,50 +5340,51 @@ all the escape sequences used in @command{awk} and
 what they represent. Unless noted otherwise, all these escape
 sequences apply to both string constants and regexp constants:
 
+@cindex ASCII
 @table @code
 @item \\
 A literal backslash, @samp{\}.
 
 @c @cindex @command{awk} language, V.4 version
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), @code{\a} escape sequence
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), @code{\a} escape sequence
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry @code{\a} escape sequence
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry @code{\a} escape sequence
 @item \a
 The ``alert'' character, @kbd{Ctrl-g}, ASCII code 7 (BEL).
 (This often makes some sort of audible noise.)
 
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), @code{\b} escape sequence
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), @code{\b} escape sequence
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry @code{\b} escape sequence
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry @code{\b} escape sequence
 @item \b
 Backspace, @kbd{Ctrl-h}, ASCII code 8 (BS).
 
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), @code{\f} escape sequence
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), @code{\f} escape sequence
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry @code{\f} escape sequence
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry @code{\f} escape sequence
 @item \f
 Formfeed, @kbd{Ctrl-l}, ASCII code 12 (FF).
 
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), @code{\n} escape sequence
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), @code{\n} escape sequence
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry @code{\n} escape sequence
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry @code{\n} escape sequence
 @item \n
 Newline, @kbd{Ctrl-j}, ASCII code 10 (LF).
 
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), @code{\r} escape sequence
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), @code{\r} escape sequence
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry @code{\r} escape sequence
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry @code{\r} escape sequence
 @item \r
 Carriage return, @kbd{Ctrl-m}, ASCII code 13 (CR).
 
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), @code{\t} escape sequence
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), @code{\t} escape sequence
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry @code{\t} escape sequence
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry @code{\t} escape sequence
 @item \t
 Horizontal TAB, @kbd{Ctrl-i}, ASCII code 9 (HT).
 
 @c @cindex @command{awk} language, V.4 version
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), @code{\v} escape sequence
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), @code{\v} escape sequence
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry @code{\v} escape sequence
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry @code{\v} escape sequence
 @item \v
 Vertical TAB, @kbd{Ctrl-k}, ASCII code 11 (VT).
 
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), @code{\}@var{nnn} escape sequence
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), @code{\}@var{nnn} escape sequence
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry @code{\}@var{nnn} escape sequence
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry @code{\}@var{nnn} escape sequence
 @item \@var{nnn}
 The octal value @var{nnn}, where @var{nnn} stands for 1 to 3 digits
 between @samp{0} and @samp{7}.  For example, the code for the ASCII ESC
@@ -5373,10 +5392,10 @@ between @samp{0} and @samp{7}.  For example, the code 
for the ASCII ESC
 
 @c @cindex @command{awk} language, V.4 version
 @c @cindex @command{awk} language, POSIX version
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), @code{\x} escape sequence
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), @code{\x} escape sequence
-@cindex common extensions, @code{\x} escape sequence
-@cindex extensions, common@comma{} @code{\x} escape sequence
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry @code{\x} escape sequence
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry @code{\x} escape sequence
+@cindex common extensions @subentry @code{\x} escape sequence
+@cindex extensions @subentry common @subentry @code{\x} escape sequence
 @item \x@var{hh}@dots{}
 The hexadecimal value @var{hh}, where @var{hh} stands for a sequence
 of hexadecimal digits (@samp{0}--@samp{9}, and either @samp{A}--@samp{F}
@@ -5397,8 +5416,8 @@ As of @value{PVERSION} 4.2, only two digits
 are processed.
 @end quotation
 
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), @code{\/} escape sequence
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), @code{\/} escape sequence
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry @code{\/} escape sequence
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry @code{\/} escape sequence
 @item \/
 A literal slash (necessary for regexp constants only).
 This sequence is used when you want to write a regexp
@@ -5409,8 +5428,8 @@ Because the regexp is delimited by
 slashes, you need to escape any slash that is part of the pattern,
 in order to tell @command{awk} to keep processing the rest of the regexp.
 
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), @code{\"} escape sequence
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), @code{\"} escape sequence
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry @code{\"} escape sequence
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry @code{\"} escape sequence
 @item \"
 A literal double quote (necessary for string constants only).
 This sequence is used when you want to write a string
@@ -5432,25 +5451,25 @@ means that the next character should be taken 
literally, even if it would
 normally be a regexp operator.  For example, @code{/a\+b/} matches the three
 characters @samp{a+b}.
 
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), in escape sequences
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), in escape sequences
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry in escape sequences
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry in escape sequences
 @cindex portability
 For complete portability, do not use a backslash before any character not
 shown in the previous list or that is not an operator.
 
 @c 11/2014: Moved so as to not stack sidebars
-@cindex sidebar, Backslash Before Regular Characters
+@cindex sidebar @subentry Backslash Before Regular Characters
 @ifdocbook
 @docbook
 <sidebar><title>Backslash Before Regular Characters</title>
 @end docbook
 
-@cindex portability, backslash in escape sequences
-@cindex POSIX @command{awk}, backslashes in string constants
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), in escape sequences, POSIX and
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), in escape sequences, POSIX and
+@cindex portability @subentry backslash in escape sequences
+@cindex POSIX @command{awk} @subentry backslashes in string constants
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry in escape sequences @subentry POSIX and
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry in escape sequences @subentry POSIX and
 
-@cindex troubleshooting, backslash before nonspecial character
+@cindex troubleshooting @subentry backslash before nonspecial character
 If you place a backslash in a string constant before something that is
 not one of the characters previously listed, POSIX @command{awk} purposely
 leaves what happens as undefined.  There are two choices:
@@ -5469,8 +5488,9 @@ surrounded by whitespace as the field separator. There 
should be
 two backslashes in the string: @samp{FS = @w{"[ \t]+\\|[ \t]+"}}.)
 @c I did this!  This is why I added the warning.
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, escape sequences
-@cindex Unix @command{awk}, backslashes in escape sequences
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry escape sequences
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry escape sequences @seealso{backslash}
+@cindex Unix @command{awk} @subentry backslashes in escape sequences
 @cindex @command{mawk} utility
 @item Leave the backslash alone
 Some other @command{awk} implementations do this.
@@ -5488,12 +5508,12 @@ In such implementations, typing @code{"a\qc"} is the 
same as typing
 @center @b{Backslash Before Regular Characters}
 
 
-@cindex portability, backslash in escape sequences
-@cindex POSIX @command{awk}, backslashes in string constants
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), in escape sequences, POSIX and
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), in escape sequences, POSIX and
+@cindex portability @subentry backslash in escape sequences
+@cindex POSIX @command{awk} @subentry backslashes in string constants
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry in escape sequences @subentry POSIX and
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry in escape sequences @subentry POSIX and
 
-@cindex troubleshooting, backslash before nonspecial character
+@cindex troubleshooting @subentry backslash before nonspecial character
 If you place a backslash in a string constant before something that is
 not one of the characters previously listed, POSIX @command{awk} purposely
 leaves what happens as undefined.  There are two choices:
@@ -5512,8 +5532,9 @@ surrounded by whitespace as the field separator. There 
should be
 two backslashes in the string: @samp{FS = @w{"[ \t]+\\|[ \t]+"}}.)
 @c I did this!  This is why I added the warning.
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, escape sequences
-@cindex Unix @command{awk}, backslashes in escape sequences
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry escape sequences
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry escape sequences @seealso{backslash}
+@cindex Unix @command{awk} @subentry backslashes in escape sequences
 @cindex @command{mawk} utility
 @item Leave the backslash alone
 Some other @command{awk} implementations do this.
@@ -5542,13 +5563,13 @@ A backslash before any other character means to treat 
that character
 literally.
 @end itemize
 
-@cindex sidebar, Escape Sequences for Metacharacters
+@cindex sidebar @subentry Escape Sequences for Metacharacters
 @ifdocbook
 @docbook
 <sidebar><title>Escape Sequences for Metacharacters</title>
 @end docbook
 
-@cindex metacharacters, escape sequences for
+@cindex metacharacters @subentry escape sequences for
 
 Suppose you use an octal or hexadecimal
 escape to represent a regexp metacharacter.
@@ -5556,7 +5577,7 @@ escape to represent a regexp metacharacter.
 Does @command{awk} treat the character as a literal character or as a regexp
 operator?
 
-@cindex dark corner, escape sequences, for metacharacters
+@cindex dark corner @subentry escape sequences @subentry for metacharacters
 Historically, such characters were taken literally.
 @value{DARKCORNER}
 However, the POSIX standard indicates that they should be treated
@@ -5576,7 +5597,7 @@ escape sequences literally when used in regexp constants. 
Thus,
 @center @b{Escape Sequences for Metacharacters}
 
 
-@cindex metacharacters, escape sequences for
+@cindex metacharacters @subentry escape sequences for
 
 Suppose you use an octal or hexadecimal
 escape to represent a regexp metacharacter.
@@ -5584,7 +5605,7 @@ escape to represent a regexp metacharacter.
 Does @command{awk} treat the character as a literal character or as a regexp
 operator?
 
-@cindex dark corner, escape sequences, for metacharacters
+@cindex dark corner @subentry escape sequences @subentry for metacharacters
 Historically, such characters were taken literally.
 @value{DARKCORNER}
 However, the POSIX standard indicates that they should be treated
@@ -5598,8 +5619,8 @@ escape sequences literally when used in regexp constants. 
Thus,
 
 @node Regexp Operators
 @section Regular Expression Operators
-@cindex regular expressions, operators
-@cindex metacharacters in regular expressions
+@cindex regular expressions @subentry operators
+@cindex metacharacters @subentry in regular expressions
 
 You can combine regular expressions with special characters,
 called @dfn{regular expression operators} or @dfn{metacharacters}, to
@@ -5627,17 +5648,17 @@ sequences and that are not listed here stand for 
themselves:
 
 @c Use @asis so the docbook comes out ok. Sigh.
 @table @asis
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), regexp operator
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), regexp operator
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry regexp operator
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry regexp operator
 @item @code{\}
 This suppresses the special meaning of a character when
 matching.  For example, @samp{\$}
 matches the character @samp{$}.
 
-@cindex regular expressions, anchors in
-@cindex Texinfo, chapter beginnings in files
-@cindex @code{^} (caret), regexp operator
-@cindex caret (@code{^}), regexp operator
+@cindex regular expressions @subentry anchors in
+@cindex Texinfo @subentry chapter beginnings in files
+@cindex @code{^} (caret) @subentry regexp operator
+@cindex caret (@code{^}) @subentry regexp operator
 @item @code{^}
 This matches the beginning of a string.  @samp{^@@chapter}
 matches @samp{@@chapter} at the beginning of a string,
@@ -5654,8 +5675,8 @@ The condition is not true in the following example:
 if ("line1\nLINE 2" ~ /^L/) @dots{}
 @end example
 
-@cindex @code{$} (dollar sign), regexp operator
-@cindex dollar sign (@code{$}), regexp operator
+@cindex @code{$} (dollar sign) @subentry regexp operator
+@cindex dollar sign (@code{$}) @subentry regexp operator
 @item @code{$}
 This is similar to @samp{^}, but it matches only at the end of a string.
 For example, @samp{p$}
@@ -5679,7 +5700,8 @@ concatenation, we can make a regular expression such as 
@samp{U.A}, which
 matches any three-character sequence that begins with @samp{U} and ends
 with @samp{A}.
 
-@cindex POSIX @command{awk}, period (@code{.})@comma{} using
+@cindex POSIX mode
+@cindex POSIX @command{awk} @subentry period (@code{.}), using
 In strict POSIX mode (@pxref{Options}),
 @samp{.} does not match the @sc{nul}
 character, which is a character with all bits equal to zero.
@@ -5689,9 +5711,9 @@ may not be able to match the @sc{nul} character.
 @cindex @code{[]} (square brackets), regexp operator
 @cindex square brackets (@code{[]}), regexp operator
 @cindex bracket expressions
-@cindex character sets, See Also bracket expressions
-@cindex character lists, See bracket expressions
-@cindex character classes, See bracket expressions
+@cindex character sets (in regular expressions) @seeentry{bracket expressions}
+@cindex character lists @seeentry{bracket expressions}
+@cindex character classes @seeentry{bracket expressions}
 @item @code{[}@dots{}@code{]}
 This is called a @dfn{bracket expression}.@footnote{In other literature,
 you may see a bracket expression referred to as either a
@@ -5703,7 +5725,7 @@ discussion of what can be inside the square brackets of a 
bracket expression
 is given in
 @ref{Bracket Expressions}.
 
-@cindex bracket expressions, complemented
+@cindex bracket expressions @subentry complemented
 @item @code{[^}@dots{}@code{]}
 This is a @dfn{complemented bracket expression}.  The first character after
 the @samp{[} @emph{must} be a @samp{^}.  It matches any characters
@@ -5723,8 +5745,8 @@ a lowercase English vowel.
 
 The alternation applies to the largest possible regexps on either side.
 
-@cindex @code{()} (parentheses), regexp operator
-@cindex parentheses @code{()}, regexp operator
+@cindex @code{()} (parentheses) @subentry regexp operator
+@cindex parentheses @code{()} @subentry regexp operator
 @item @code{(}@dots{}@code{)}
 Parentheses are used for grouping in regular expressions, as in
 arithmetic.  They can be used to concatenate regular expressions
@@ -5739,8 +5761,8 @@ one literally, precede it with a backslash. However, the 
right or
 closing parenthesis is only special when paired with a left parenthesis;
 an unpaired right parenthesis is (silently) treated as a regular character.
 
-@cindex @code{*} (asterisk), @code{*} operator, as regexp operator
-@cindex asterisk (@code{*}), @code{*} operator, as regexp operator
+@cindex @code{*} (asterisk) @subentry @code{*} operator @subentry as regexp 
operator
+@cindex asterisk (@code{*}) @subentry @code{*} operator @subentry as regexp 
operator
 @item @code{*}
 This symbol means that the preceding regular expression should be
 repeated as many times as necessary to find a match.  For example, @samp{ph*}
@@ -5758,21 +5780,23 @@ Second, @samp{*} finds as many repetitions as possible. 
If the text
 to be matched is @samp{phhhhhhhhhhhhhhooey}, @samp{ph*} matches all of
 the @samp{h}s.
 
-@cindex @code{+} (plus sign), regexp operator
-@cindex plus sign (@code{+}), regexp operator
+@cindex @code{+} (plus sign) @subentry regexp operator
+@cindex plus sign (@code{+}) @subentry regexp operator
 @item @code{+}
 This symbol is similar to @samp{*}, except that the preceding expression must 
be
 matched at least once.  This means that @samp{wh+y}
 would match @samp{why} and @samp{whhy}, but not @samp{wy}, whereas
 @samp{wh*y} would match all three.
 
-@cindex @code{?} (question mark), regexp operator
-@cindex question mark (@code{?}), regexp operator
+@cindex @code{?} (question mark) @subentry regexp operator
+@cindex question mark (@code{?}) @subentry regexp operator
 @item @code{?}
 This symbol is similar to @samp{*}, except that the preceding expression can be
 matched either once or not at all.  For example, @samp{fe?d}
 matches @samp{fed} and @samp{fd}, but nothing else.
 
+@cindex @code{@{@}} (braces) @subentry regexp operator
+@cindex braces (@code{@{@}}) @subentry regexp operator
 @cindex interval expressions, regexp operator
 @item @code{@{}@var{n}@code{@}}
 @itemx @code{@{}@var{n}@code{,@}}
@@ -5797,16 +5821,16 @@ Matches @samp{whhy}, @samp{whhhy}, and so on.
 @end table
 @end table
 
-@cindex precedence, regexp operators
-@cindex regular expressions, operators, precedence of
+@cindex precedence @subentry regexp operators
+@cindex regular expressions @subentry operators @subentry precedence of
 In regular expressions, the @samp{*}, @samp{+}, and @samp{?} operators,
 as well as the braces @samp{@{} and @samp{@}},
 have
 the highest precedence, followed by concatenation, and finally by @samp{|}.
 As in arithmetic, parentheses can change how operators are grouped.
 
-@cindex POSIX @command{awk}, regular expressions and
-@cindex @command{gawk}, regular expressions, precedence
+@cindex POSIX @command{awk} @subentry regular expressions and
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry regular expressions @subentry precedence
 In POSIX @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, the @samp{*}, @samp{+}, and
 @samp{?} operators stand for themselves when there is nothing in the
 regexp that precedes them.  For example, @code{/+/} matches a literal
@@ -5816,12 +5840,12 @@ usage as a syntax error.
 @node Interval Expressions
 @subsection Some Notes On Interval Expressions
 
-@cindex POSIX @command{awk}, interval expressions in
+@cindex POSIX @command{awk} @subentry interval expressions in
 Interval expressions were not traditionally available in @command{awk}.
 They were added as part of the POSIX standard to make @command{awk}
 and @command{egrep} consistent with each other.
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, interval expressions and
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry interval expressions and
 Initially, because old programs may use @samp{@{} and @samp{@}} in regexp
 constants,
 @command{gawk} did @emph{not} match interval expressions
@@ -5854,9 +5878,9 @@ when in compatibility mode (@pxref{Options}).
 @node Bracket Expressions
 @section Using Bracket Expressions
 @cindex bracket expressions
-@cindex bracket expressions, range expressions
+@cindex bracket expressions @subentry range expressions
 @cindex range expressions (regexps)
-@cindex character lists in regular expressions
+@cindex bracket expressions @subentry character lists
 
 As mentioned earlier, a bracket expression matches any character among
 those listed between the opening and closing square brackets.
@@ -5878,12 +5902,12 @@ the range 0--256).  To match a range of characters 
where the endpoints
 of the range are larger than 256, enter the multibyte encodings of
 the characters directly.
 
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), in bracket expressions
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), in bracket expressions
-@cindex @code{^} (caret), in bracket expressions
-@cindex caret (@code{^}), in bracket expressions
-@cindex @code{-} (hyphen), in bracket expressions
-@cindex hyphen (@code{-}), in bracket expressions
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry in bracket expressions
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry in bracket expressions
+@cindex @code{^} (caret) @subentry in bracket expressions
+@cindex caret (@code{^}) @subentry in bracket expressions
+@cindex @code{-} (hyphen) @subentry in bracket expressions
+@cindex hyphen (@code{-}) @subentry in bracket expressions
 To include one of the characters @samp{\}, @samp{]}, @samp{-}, or @samp{^} in a
 bracket expression, put a @samp{\} in front of it.  For example:
 
@@ -5897,7 +5921,7 @@ Additionally, if you place @samp{]} right after the 
opening
 @samp{[}, the closing bracket is treated as one of the
 characters to be matched.
 
-@cindex POSIX @command{awk}, bracket expressions and
+@cindex POSIX @command{awk} @subentry bracket expressions and
 @cindex Extended Regular Expressions (EREs)
 @cindex EREs (Extended Regular Expressions)
 @cindex @command{egrep} utility
@@ -5909,8 +5933,8 @@ of the POSIX specification for Extended Regular 
Expressions (EREs).
 POSIX EREs are based on the regular expressions accepted by the
 traditional @command{egrep} utility.
 
-@cindex bracket expressions, character classes
-@cindex POSIX @command{awk}, bracket expressions and, character classes
+@cindex bracket expressions @subentry character classes
+@cindex POSIX @command{awk} @subentry bracket expressions and @subentry 
character classes
 @dfn{Character classes} are a feature introduced in the POSIX standard.
 A character class is a special notation for describing
 lists of characters that have a specific attribute, but the
@@ -5978,6 +6002,7 @@ depends on various factors out of our control.
 @c Thanks to
 @c Date: Tue, 01 Jul 2014 07:39:51 +0200
 @c From: Hermann Peifer <address@hidden>
+@cindex ASCII
 Some utilities that match regular expressions provide a nonstandard
 @samp{[:ascii:]} character class; @command{awk} does not. However, you
 can simulate such a construct using @samp{[\x00-\x7F]}.  This matches
@@ -5992,8 +6017,8 @@ treat @code{[:blank:]} like @code{[:space:]}, incorrectly 
matching
 more characters than they should.  Caveat Emptor.
 @end quotation
 
-@cindex bracket expressions, collating elements
-@cindex bracket expressions, non-ASCII
+@cindex bracket expressions @subentry collating elements
+@cindex bracket expressions @subentry non-ASCII
 @cindex collating elements
 Two additional special sequences can appear in bracket expressions.
 These apply to non-ASCII character sets, which can have single symbols
@@ -6004,7 +6029,7 @@ and a grave-accented ``@`e'' are equivalent.)
 These sequences are:
 
 @table @asis
-@cindex bracket expressions, collating symbols
+@cindex bracket expressions @subentry collating symbols
 @cindex collating symbols
 @item Collating symbols
 Multicharacter collating elements enclosed between
@@ -6012,7 +6037,7 @@ Multicharacter collating elements enclosed between
 then @samp{[[.ch.]]} is a regexp that matches this collating element, whereas
 @samp{[ch]} is a regexp that matches either @samp{c} or @samp{h}.
 
-@cindex bracket expressions, equivalence classes
+@cindex bracket expressions @subentry equivalence classes
 @item Equivalence classes
 Locale-specific names for a list of
 characters that are equal. The name is enclosed between
@@ -6024,9 +6049,9 @@ that matches any of @samp{e}, @samp{@^e}, @samp{@'e}, or 
@samp{@`e}.
 
 These features are very valuable in non-English-speaking locales.
 
-@cindex internationalization, localization, character classes
-@cindex @command{gawk}, character classes and
-@cindex POSIX @command{awk}, bracket expressions and, character classes
+@cindex internationalization @subentry localization @subentry character classes
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry character classes and
+@cindex POSIX @command{awk} @subentry bracket expressions and @subentry 
character classes
 @quotation CAUTION
 The library functions that @command{gawk} uses for regular
 expression matching currently recognize only POSIX character classes;
@@ -6041,7 +6066,7 @@ taken literally. This is also true of @samp{.} and 
@samp{*}.
 @node Leftmost Longest
 @section How Much Text Matches?
 
-@cindex regular expressions, leftmost longest match
+@cindex regular expressions @subentry leftmost longest match
 @c @cindex matching, leftmost longest
 Consider the following:
 
@@ -6080,12 +6105,12 @@ and also @pxref{Field Separators}).
 @node Computed Regexps
 @section Using Dynamic Regexps
 
-@cindex regular expressions, computed
-@cindex regular expressions, dynamic
+@cindex regular expressions @subentry computed
+@cindex regular expressions @subentry dynamic
 @cindex @code{~} (tilde), @code{~} operator
 @cindex tilde (@code{~}), @code{~} operator
-@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point), @code{!~} operator
-@cindex exclamation point (@code{!}), @code{!~} operator
+@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point) @subentry @code{!~} operator
+@cindex exclamation point (@code{!}) @subentry @code{!~} operator
 @c @cindex operators, @code{~}
 @c @cindex operators, @code{!~}
 The righthand side of a @samp{~} or @samp{!~} operator need not be a
@@ -6116,11 +6141,11 @@ on the right.  This is true of any string-valued 
expression (such as
 @code{digits_regexp}, shown in the previous example), not just string 
constants.
 @end quotation
 
-@cindex regexp constants, slashes vs.@: quotes
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), in regexp constants
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), in regexp constants
-@cindex @code{"} (double quote), in regexp constants
-@cindex double quote (@code{"}), in regexp constants
+@cindex regexp constants @subentry slashes vs.@: quotes
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry in regexp constants
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry in regexp constants
+@cindex @code{"} (double quote) @subentry in regexp constants
+@cindex double quote (@code{"}) @subentry in regexp constants
 What difference does it make if the string is
 scanned twice? The answer has to do with escape sequences, and particularly
 with backslashes.  To get a backslash into a regular expression inside a
@@ -6132,9 +6157,9 @@ you have to type @code{"\\*"}.  The first backslash 
escapes the
 second one so that the string actually contains the
 two characters @samp{\} and @samp{*}.
 
-@cindex troubleshooting, regexp constants vs.@: string constants
-@cindex regexp constants, vs.@: string constants
-@cindex string constants, vs.@: regexp constants
+@cindex troubleshooting @subentry regexp constants vs.@: string constants
+@cindex regexp constants @subentry vs.@: string constants
+@cindex string @subentry constants @subentry vs.@: regexp constants
 Given that you can use both regexp and string constants to describe
 regular expressions, which should you use?  The answer is ``regexp
 constants,'' for several reasons:
@@ -6158,14 +6183,14 @@ Using regexp constants is better form; it shows clearly 
that you
 intend a regexp match.
 @end itemize
 
-@cindex sidebar, Using @code{\n} in Bracket Expressions of Dynamic Regexps
+@cindex sidebar @subentry Using @code{\n} in Bracket Expressions of Dynamic 
Regexps
 @ifdocbook
 @docbook
 <sidebar><title>Using @code{\n} in Bracket Expressions of Dynamic 
Regexps</title>
 @end docbook
 
-@cindex regular expressions, dynamic, with embedded newlines
-@cindex newlines, in dynamic regexps
+@cindex regular expressions @subentry dynamic @subentry with embedded newlines
+@cindex newlines @subentry in dynamic regexps
 
 Some older versions of @command{awk} do not allow the newline
 character to be used inside a bracket expression for a dynamic regexp:
@@ -6179,7 +6204,7 @@ $ @kbd{awk '$0 ~ "[ \t\n]"'}
 @error{}        $0 ~ "[ >>>  \t\n]" <<<
 @end example
 
-@cindex newlines, in regexp constants
+@cindex newlines @subentry in regexp constants
 But a newline in a regexp constant works with no problem:
 
 @example
@@ -6202,8 +6227,8 @@ occur often in practice, but it's worth noting for future 
reference.
 @center @b{Using @code{\n} in Bracket Expressions of Dynamic Regexps}
 
 
-@cindex regular expressions, dynamic, with embedded newlines
-@cindex newlines, in dynamic regexps
+@cindex regular expressions @subentry dynamic @subentry with embedded newlines
+@cindex newlines @subentry in dynamic regexps
 
 Some older versions of @command{awk} do not allow the newline
 character to be used inside a bracket expression for a dynamic regexp:
@@ -6217,7 +6242,7 @@ $ @kbd{awk '$0 ~ "[ \t\n]"'}
 @error{}        $0 ~ "[ >>>  \t\n]" <<<
 @end example
 
-@cindex newlines, in regexp constants
+@cindex newlines @subentry in regexp constants
 But a newline in a regexp constant works with no problem:
 
 @example
@@ -6237,10 +6262,10 @@ occur often in practice, but it's worth noting for 
future reference.
 
 @c This section adapted (long ago) from the regex-0.12 manual
 
-@cindex regular expressions, operators, @command{gawk}
-@cindex @command{gawk}, regular expressions, operators
-@cindex operators, GNU-specific
-@cindex regular expressions, operators, for words
+@cindex regular expressions @subentry operators @subentry @command{gawk}
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry regular expressions @subentry operators
+@cindex operators @subentry GNU-specific
+@cindex regular expressions @subentry operators @subentry for words
 @cindex word, regexp definition of
 GNU software that deals with regular expressions provides a number of
 additional regexp operators.  These operators are described in this
@@ -6252,64 +6277,64 @@ or underscores (@samp{_}):
 
 @table @code
 @c @cindex operators, @code{\s} (@command{gawk})
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), @code{\s} operator (@command{gawk})
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), @code{\s} operator (@command{gawk})
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry @code{\s} operator (@command{gawk})
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry @code{\s} operator (@command{gawk})
 @item \s
 Matches any whitespace character.
 Think of it as shorthand for
 @w{@samp{[[:space:]]}}.
 
 @c @cindex operators, @code{\S} (@command{gawk})
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), @code{\S} operator (@command{gawk})
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), @code{\S} operator (@command{gawk})
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry @code{\S} operator (@command{gawk})
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry @code{\S} operator (@command{gawk})
 @item \S
 Matches any character that is not whitespace.
 Think of it as shorthand for
 @w{@samp{[^[:space:]]}}.
 
 @c @cindex operators, @code{\w} (@command{gawk})
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), @code{\w} operator (@command{gawk})
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), @code{\w} operator (@command{gawk})
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry @code{\w} operator (@command{gawk})
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry @code{\w} operator (@command{gawk})
 @item \w
 Matches any word-constituent character---that is, it matches any
 letter, digit, or underscore. Think of it as shorthand for
 @w{@samp{[[:alnum:]_]}}.
 
 @c @cindex operators, @code{\W} (@command{gawk})
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), @code{\W} operator (@command{gawk})
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), @code{\W} operator (@command{gawk})
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry @code{\W} operator (@command{gawk})
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry @code{\W} operator (@command{gawk})
 @item \W
 Matches any character that is not word-constituent.
 Think of it as shorthand for
 @w{@samp{[^[:alnum:]_]}}.
 
 @c @cindex operators, @code{\<} (@command{gawk})
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), @code{\<} operator (@command{gawk})
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), @code{\<} operator (@command{gawk})
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry @code{\<} operator (@command{gawk})
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry @code{\<} operator (@command{gawk})
 @item \<
 Matches the empty string at the beginning of a word.
 For example, @code{/\<away/} matches @samp{away} but not
 @samp{stowaway}.
 
 @c @cindex operators, @code{\>} (@command{gawk})
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), @code{\>} operator (@command{gawk})
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), @code{\>} operator (@command{gawk})
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry @code{\>} operator (@command{gawk})
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry @code{\>} operator (@command{gawk})
 @item \>
 Matches the empty string at the end of a word.
 For example, @code{/stow\>/} matches @samp{stow} but not @samp{stowaway}.
 
 @c @cindex operators, @code{\y} (@command{gawk})
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), @code{\y} operator (@command{gawk})
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), @code{\y} operator (@command{gawk})
-@cindex word boundaries@comma{} matching
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry @code{\y} operator (@command{gawk})
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry @code{\y} operator (@command{gawk})
+@cindex word boundaries, matching
 @item \y
 Matches the empty string at either the beginning or the
 end of a word (i.e., the word boundar@strong{y}).  For example, 
@samp{\yballs?\y}
 matches either @samp{ball} or @samp{balls}, as a separate word.
 
 @c @cindex operators, @code{\B} (@command{gawk})
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), @code{\B} operator (@command{gawk})
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), @code{\B} operator (@command{gawk})
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry @code{\B} operator (@command{gawk})
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry @code{\B} operator (@command{gawk})
 @item \B
 Matches the empty string that occurs between two
 word-constituent characters. For example,
@@ -6317,9 +6342,9 @@ word-constituent characters. For example,
 @samp{\B} is essentially the opposite of @samp{\y}.
 @end table
 
-@cindex buffers, operators for
-@cindex regular expressions, operators, for buffers
-@cindex operators, string-matching, for buffers
+@cindex buffers @subentry operators for
+@cindex regular expressions @subentry operators @subentry for buffers
+@cindex operators @subentry string-matching @subentry for buffers
 There are two other operators that work on buffers.  In Emacs, a
 @dfn{buffer} is, naturally, an Emacs buffer.
 Other GNU programs, including @command{gawk},
@@ -6329,31 +6354,31 @@ The operators are:
 @table @code
 @item \`
 @c @cindex operators, @code{\`} (@command{gawk})
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), @code{\`} operator (@command{gawk})
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), @code{\`} operator (@command{gawk})
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry @code{\`} operator (@command{gawk})
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry @code{\`} operator (@command{gawk})
 Matches the empty string at the
 beginning of a buffer (string)
 
 @c @cindex operators, @code{\'} (@command{gawk})
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), @code{\'} operator (@command{gawk})
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), @code{\'} operator (@command{gawk})
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry @code{\'} operator (@command{gawk})
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry @code{\'} operator (@command{gawk})
 @item \'
 Matches the empty string at the
 end of a buffer (string)
 @end table
 
-@cindex @code{^} (caret), regexp operator
-@cindex caret (@code{^}), regexp operator
-@cindex @code{?} (question mark), regexp operator
-@cindex question mark (@code{?}), regexp operator
+@cindex @code{^} (caret) @subentry regexp operator
+@cindex caret (@code{^}) @subentry regexp operator
+@cindex @code{?} (question mark) @subentry regexp operator
+@cindex question mark (@code{?}) @subentry regexp operator
 Because @samp{^} and @samp{$} always work in terms of the beginning
 and end of strings, these operators don't add any new capabilities
 for @command{awk}.  They are provided for compatibility with other
 GNU software.
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, word-boundary operator
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry word-boundary operator
 @cindex word-boundary operator (@command{gawk})
-@cindex operators, word-boundary (@command{gawk})
+@cindex operators @subentry word-boundary (@command{gawk})
 In other GNU software, the word-boundary operator is @samp{\b}. However,
 that conflicts with the @command{awk} language's definition of @samp{\b}
 as backspace, so @command{gawk} uses a different letter.
@@ -6362,8 +6387,8 @@ GNU operators, but this was deemed too confusing. The 
current
 method of using @samp{\y} for the GNU @samp{\b} appears to be the
 lesser of two evils.
 
-@cindex regular expressions, @command{gawk}, command-line options
-@cindex @command{gawk}, command-line options, and regular expressions
+@cindex regular expressions @subentry @command{gawk}, command-line options
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry command-line options, regular expressions and
 The various command-line options
 (@pxref{Options})
 control how @command{gawk} interprets characters in regexps:
@@ -6406,8 +6431,8 @@ Otherwise, interval expressions are available by default.
 @node Case-sensitivity
 @section Case Sensitivity in Matching
 
-@cindex regular expressions, case sensitivity
-@cindex case sensitivity, regexps and
+@cindex regular expressions @subentry case sensitivity
+@cindex case sensitivity @subentry regexps and
 Case is normally significant in regular expressions, both when matching
 ordinary characters (i.e., not metacharacters) and inside bracket
 expressions.  Thus, a @samp{w} in a regular expression matches only a lowercase
@@ -6433,15 +6458,15 @@ tolower($1) ~ /foo/  @{ @dots{} @}
 converts the first field to lowercase before matching against it.
 This works in any POSIX-compliant @command{awk}.
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, regular expressions, case sensitivity
-@cindex case sensitivity, @command{gawk}
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, regular expressions
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry regular expressions @subentry case sensitivity
+@cindex case sensitivity @subentry @command{gawk}
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry regular 
expressions
 @cindex @code{~} (tilde), @code{~} operator
 @cindex tilde (@code{~}), @code{~} operator
-@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point), @code{!~} operator
-@cindex exclamation point (@code{!}), @code{!~} operator
-@cindex @code{IGNORECASE} variable, with @code{~} and @code{!~} operators
-@cindex @command{gawk}, @code{IGNORECASE} variable in
+@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point) @subentry @code{!~} operator
+@cindex exclamation point (@code{!}) @subentry @code{!~} operator
+@cindex @code{IGNORECASE} variable @subentry with @code{~} and @code{!~} 
operators
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry @code{IGNORECASE} variable in
 @c @cindex variables, @code{IGNORECASE}
 Another method, specific to @command{gawk}, is to set the variable
 @code{IGNORECASE} to a nonzero value (@pxref{Built-in Variables}).
@@ -6546,7 +6571,7 @@ versions, use @code{tolower()} or @code{toupper()}.
 @chapter Reading Input Files
 
 @cindex reading input files
-@cindex input files, reading
+@cindex input files @subentry reading
 @cindex input files
 @cindex @code{FILENAME} variable
 In the typical @command{awk} program,
@@ -6598,8 +6623,8 @@ used with it do not have to be named on the @command{awk} 
command line
 @node Records
 @section How Input Is Split into Records
 
-@cindex input, splitting into records
-@cindex records, splitting input into
+@cindex input @subentry splitting into records
+@cindex records @subentry splitting input into
 @cindex @code{NR} variable
 @cindex @code{FNR} variable
 @command{awk} divides the input for your program into records and fields.
@@ -6624,7 +6649,7 @@ This mechanism is explained in greater detail shortly.
 @node awk split records
 @subsection Record Splitting with Standard @command{awk}
 
-@cindex separators, for records
+@cindex separators @subentry for records
 @cindex record separators
 Records are separated by a character called the @dfn{record separator}.
 By default, the record separator is the newline character.
@@ -6632,8 +6657,8 @@ This is why records are, by default, single lines.
 To use a different character for the record separator,
 simply assign that character to the predefined variable @code{RS}.
 
-@cindex record separators, newlines as
-@cindex newlines, as record separators
+@cindex record separators @subentry newlines as
+@cindex newlines @subentry as record separators
 @cindex @code{RS} variable
 Like any other variable,
 the value of @code{RS} can be changed in the @command{awk} program
@@ -6725,8 +6750,8 @@ the newline separating them in the output
 is the original newline in the @value{DF}, not the one added by
 @command{awk} when it printed the record!
 
-@cindex record separators, changing
-@cindex separators, for records
+@cindex record separators @subentry changing
+@cindex separators @subentry for records
 Another way to change the record separator is on the command line,
 using the variable-assignment feature
 (@pxref{Other Arguments}):
@@ -6767,14 +6792,14 @@ variable @code{NF} is the number of fields in the 
current record.
 printing @samp{0} as the result. Most other versions of @command{awk}
 also act this way.)
 
-@cindex dark corner, input files
+@cindex dark corner @subentry input files
 Reaching the end of an input file terminates the current input record,
 even if the last character in the file is not the character in @code{RS}.
 @value{DARKCORNER}
 
-@cindex empty strings
+@cindex empty strings @seeentry{null strings}
 @cindex null strings
-@cindex strings, empty, See null strings
+@cindex strings @subentry empty @seeentry{null strings}
 The empty string @code{""} (a string without any characters)
 has a special meaning
 as the value of @code{RS}. It means that records are separated
@@ -6786,15 +6811,15 @@ the new value is used to delimit subsequent records, 
but the record
 currently being processed, as well as records already processed, are not
 affected.
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, @code{RT} variable in
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry @code{RT} variable in
 @cindex @code{RT} variable
-@cindex records, terminating
+@cindex records @subentry terminating
 @cindex terminating records
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, record separators
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, @code{RS}/@code{RT} 
variables
-@cindex regular expressions, as record separators
-@cindex record separators, regular expressions as
-@cindex separators, for records, regular expressions as
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry record 
separators
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry 
@code{RS}/@code{RT} variables
+@cindex regular expressions @subentry as record separators
+@cindex record separators @subentry regular expressions as
+@cindex separators @subentry for records @subentry regular expressions as
 After the end of the record has been determined, @command{gawk}
 sets the variable @code{RT} to the text in the input that matched
 @code{RS}.
@@ -6802,8 +6827,8 @@ sets the variable @code{RT} to the text in the input that 
matched
 @node gawk split records
 @subsection Record Splitting with @command{gawk}
 
-@cindex common extensions, @code{RS} as a regexp
-@cindex extensions, common@comma{} @code{RS} as a regexp
+@cindex common extensions @subentry @code{RS} as a regexp
+@cindex extensions @subentry common @subentry @code{RS} as a regexp
 When using @command{gawk}, the value of @code{RS} is not limited to a
 one-character string.  If it contains more than one character, it is
 treated as a regular expression
@@ -6867,9 +6892,9 @@ that happens to contain newline characters.
 It is thus best to avoid anchor metacharacters in the value of @code{RS}.
 @end quotation
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, @code{RT} variable in
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry @code{RT} variable in
 @cindex @code{RT} variable
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, @code{RS}/@code{RT} 
variables
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry 
@code{RS}/@code{RT} variables
 The use of @code{RS} as a regular expression and the @code{RT}
 variable are @command{gawk} extensions; they are not available in
 compatibility mode
@@ -6877,13 +6902,13 @@ compatibility mode
 In compatibility mode, only the first character of the value of
 @code{RS} determines the end of the record.
 
-@cindex sidebar, @code{RS = "\0"} Is Not Portable
+@cindex sidebar @subentry @code{RS = "\0"} Is Not Portable
 @ifdocbook
 @docbook
 <sidebar><title>@code{RS = "\0"} Is Not Portable</title>
 @end docbook
 
-@cindex portability, data files as single record
+@cindex portability @subentry data files as single record
 There are times when you might want to treat an entire @value{DF} as a
 single record.  The only way to make this happen is to give @code{RS}
 a value that you know doesn't occur in the input file.  This is hard
@@ -6898,7 +6923,7 @@ value to use for @code{RS} in this case:
 BEGIN @{ RS = "\0" @}  # whole file becomes one record?
 @end example
 
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, strings, storing
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry strings 
@subentry storing
 @command{gawk} in fact accepts this, and uses the @sc{nul}
 character for the record separator.
 This works for certain special files, such as @file{/proc/environ} on
@@ -6906,7 +6931,7 @@ GNU/Linux systems, where the @sc{nul} character is in 
fact the record separator.
 However, this usage is @emph{not} portable
 to most other @command{awk} implementations.
 
-@cindex dark corner, strings, storing
+@cindex dark corner @subentry strings, storing
 Almost all other @command{awk} implementations@footnote{At least that we know
 about.} store strings internally as C-style strings.  C strings use the
 @sc{nul} character as the string terminator.  In effect, this means that
@@ -6918,7 +6943,7 @@ character as a record separator. However, this is a 
special case:
 @command{mawk} does not allow embedded @sc{nul} characters in strings.
 (This may change in a future version of @command{mawk}.)
 
-@cindex records, treating files as
+@cindex records @subentry treating files as
 @cindex treating files, as single records
 @cindex single records, treating files as
 @xref{Readfile Function} for an interesting way to read
@@ -6935,7 +6960,7 @@ Readfile} for another option.
 @center @b{@code{RS = "\0"} Is Not Portable}
 
 
-@cindex portability, data files as single record
+@cindex portability @subentry data files as single record
 There are times when you might want to treat an entire @value{DF} as a
 single record.  The only way to make this happen is to give @code{RS}
 a value that you know doesn't occur in the input file.  This is hard
@@ -6950,7 +6975,7 @@ value to use for @code{RS} in this case:
 BEGIN @{ RS = "\0" @}  # whole file becomes one record?
 @end example
 
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, strings, storing
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry strings 
@subentry storing
 @command{gawk} in fact accepts this, and uses the @sc{nul}
 character for the record separator.
 This works for certain special files, such as @file{/proc/environ} on
@@ -6958,7 +6983,7 @@ GNU/Linux systems, where the @sc{nul} character is in 
fact the record separator.
 However, this usage is @emph{not} portable
 to most other @command{awk} implementations.
 
-@cindex dark corner, strings, storing
+@cindex dark corner @subentry strings, storing
 Almost all other @command{awk} implementations@footnote{At least that we know
 about.} store strings internally as C-style strings.  C strings use the
 @sc{nul} character as the string terminator.  In effect, this means that
@@ -6970,7 +6995,7 @@ character as a record separator. However, this is a 
special case:
 @command{mawk} does not allow embedded @sc{nul} characters in strings.
 (This may change in a future version of @command{mawk}.)
 
-@cindex records, treating files as
+@cindex records @subentry treating files as
 @cindex treating files, as single records
 @cindex single records, treating files as
 @xref{Readfile Function} for an interesting way to read
@@ -6985,7 +7010,7 @@ Readfile} for another option.
 @cindex examining fields
 @cindex fields
 @cindex accessing fields
-@cindex fields, examining
+@cindex fields @subentry examining
 When @command{awk} reads an input record, the record is
 automatically @dfn{parsed} or separated by the @command{awk} utility into 
chunks
 called @dfn{fields}.  By default, fields are separated by @dfn{whitespace},
@@ -7002,9 +7027,9 @@ operate on the whole record if you want---but fields are 
what make
 simple @command{awk} programs so powerful.
 
 @cindex field operator @code{$}
-@cindex @code{$} (dollar sign), @code{$} field operator
-@cindex dollar sign (@code{$}), @code{$} field operator
-@cindex field operators@comma{} dollar sign as
+@cindex @code{$} (dollar sign) @subentry @code{$} field operator
+@cindex dollar sign (@code{$}) @subentry @code{$} field operator
+@cindex field operators, dollar sign as
 You use a dollar sign (@samp{$})
 to refer to a field in an @command{awk} program,
 followed by the number of the field you want.  Thus, @code{$1}
@@ -7025,7 +7050,7 @@ Here the first field, or @code{$1}, is @samp{This}, the 
second field, or
 field.
 
 @cindex @code{NF} variable
-@cindex fields, number of
+@cindex fields @subentry number of
 @code{NF} is a predefined variable whose value is the number of fields
 in the current record.  @command{awk} automatically updates the value
 of @code{NF} each time it reads a record.  No matter how many fields
@@ -7064,7 +7089,7 @@ $ @kbd{awk '/li/ @{ print $1, $NF @}' mail-list}
 
 @node Nonconstant Fields
 @section Nonconstant Field Numbers
-@cindex fields, numbers
+@cindex fields @subentry numbers
 @cindex field numbers
 
 A field number need not be a constant.  Any expression in
@@ -7121,7 +7146,7 @@ evaluating @code{NF} and using its value as a field 
number.
 @node Changing Fields
 @section Changing the Contents of a Field
 
-@cindex fields, changing contents of
+@cindex fields @subentry changing contents of
 The contents of a field, as seen by @command{awk}, can be changed within an
 @command{awk} program; this changes what @command{awk} perceives as the
 current input record.  (The actual input is untouched; @command{awk} 
@emph{never}
@@ -7181,8 +7206,8 @@ $ @kbd{awk '@{ $6 = ($5 + $4 + $3 + $2)}
 @dots{}
 @end example
 
-@cindex adding, fields
-@cindex fields, adding
+@cindex adding @subentry fields
+@cindex fields @subentry adding
 @noindent
 We've just created @code{$6}, whose value is the sum of fields
 @code{$2}, @code{$3}, @code{$4}, and @code{$5}.  The @samp{+} sign
@@ -7196,8 +7221,8 @@ the appropriate number of field separators between it and 
the previously
 existing fields.
 
 @cindex @code{OFS} variable
-@cindex output field separator, See @code{OFS} variable
-@cindex field separators, See Also @code{OFS}
+@cindex output field separator @seeentry{@code{OFS} variable}
+@cindex field separator @seealso{@code{OFS}}
 This recomputation affects and is affected by
 @code{NF} (the number of fields; @pxref{Fields}).
 For example, the value of @code{NF} is set to the number of the highest
@@ -7254,8 +7279,8 @@ The intervening field, @code{$5}, is created with an 
empty value
 (indicated by the second pair of adjacent colons),
 and @code{NF} is updated with the value six.
 
-@cindex dark corner, @code{NF} variable, decrementing
-@cindex @code{NF} variable, decrementing
+@cindex dark corner @subentry @code{NF} variable, decrementing
+@cindex @code{NF} variable @subentry decrementing
 Decrementing @code{NF} throws away the values of the fields
 after the new value of @code{NF} and recomputes @code{$0}.
 @value{DARKCORNER}
@@ -7268,7 +7293,7 @@ $ @kbd{echo a b c d e f | awk '@{ print "NF =", NF;}
 @print{} a b c
 @end example
 
-@cindex portability, @code{NF} variable@comma{} decrementing
+@cindex portability @subentry @code{NF} variable, decrementing
 @quotation CAUTION
 Some versions of @command{awk} don't
 rebuild @code{$0} when @code{NF} is decremented.
@@ -7299,7 +7324,7 @@ This also applies to any built-in function that updates 
@code{$0},
 such as @code{sub()} and @code{gsub()}
 (@pxref{String Functions}).
 
-@cindex sidebar, Understanding @code{$0}
+@cindex sidebar @subentry Understanding @code{$0}
 @ifdocbook
 @docbook
 <sidebar><title>Understanding @code{$0}</title>
@@ -7361,9 +7386,9 @@ with a statement such as @samp{$1 = $1}, as described 
earlier.
 @end menu
 
 @cindex @code{FS} variable
-@cindex fields, separating
-@cindex field separators
-@cindex fields, separating
+@cindex fields @subentry separating
+@cindex field separator
+@cindex fields @subentry separating
 The @dfn{field separator}, which is either a single character or a regular
 expression, controls the way @command{awk} splits an input record into fields.
 @command{awk} scans the input record for character sequences that
@@ -7382,13 +7407,13 @@ is split into three fields: @samp{m}, 
@samp{@bullet{}g}, and
 @samp{@bullet{}gai@bullet{}pan}.
 Note the leading spaces in the values of the second and third fields.
 
-@cindex troubleshooting, @command{awk} uses @code{FS} not @code{IFS}
+@cindex troubleshooting @subentry @command{awk} uses @code{FS} not @code{IFS}
 The field separator is represented by the predefined variable @code{FS}.
 Shell programmers take note:  @command{awk} does @emph{not} use the
 name @code{IFS} that is used by the POSIX-compliant shells (such as
 the Unix Bourne shell, @command{sh}, or Bash).
 
-@cindex @code{FS} variable, changing value of
+@cindex @code{FS} variable @subentry changing value of
 The value of @code{FS} can be changed in the @command{awk} program with the
 assignment operator, @samp{=} (@pxref{Assignment Ops}).
 Often, the right time to do this is at the beginning of execution
@@ -7415,9 +7440,9 @@ John Q. Smith, 29 Oak St., Walamazoo, MI 42139
 this @command{awk} program extracts and prints the string
 @samp{@bullet{}29@bullet{}Oak@bullet{}St.}.
 
-@cindex field separators, choice of
-@cindex regular expressions, as field separators
-@cindex field separators, regular expressions as
+@cindex field separator @subentry choice of
+@cindex regular expressions @subentry as field separators
+@cindex field separator @subentry regular expression as
 Sometimes the input data contains separator characters that don't
 separate fields the way you thought they would.  For instance, the
 person's name in the example we just used might have a title or
@@ -7440,8 +7465,10 @@ can massage it first with a separate @command{awk} 
program.)
 @node Default Field Splitting
 @subsection Whitespace Normally Separates Fields
 
-@cindex field separators, whitespace as
-@cindex whitespace, as field separators
+@cindex field separator @subentry whitespace as
+@cindex whitespace @subentry as field separators
+@cindex field separator @subentry @code{FS} variable and
+@cindex separators @subentry field @subentry @code{FS} variable and
 Fields are normally separated by whitespace sequences
 (spaces, TABs, and newlines), not by single spaces.  Two spaces in a row do not
 delimit an empty field.  The default value of the field separator @code{FS}
@@ -7462,8 +7489,8 @@ rules.
 @node Regexp Field Splitting
 @subsection Using Regular Expressions to Separate Fields
 
-@cindex regular expressions, as field separators
-@cindex field separators, regular expressions as
+@cindex regular expressions @subentry as field separators
+@cindex field separator @subentry regular expression as
 The previous @value{SUBSECTION}
 discussed the use of single characters or simple strings as the
 value of @code{FS}.
@@ -7518,8 +7545,7 @@ $ @kbd{echo ' a  b  c  d ' | awk 'BEGIN @{ FS = "[ 
\t\n]+" @}}
 
 @noindent
 @cindex null strings
-@cindex strings, null
-@cindex empty strings, See null strings
+@cindex strings @subentry null
 In this case, the first field is null, or empty.
 
 The stripping of leading and trailing whitespace also comes into
@@ -7540,9 +7566,9 @@ Because the leading whitespace was ignored when finding 
@code{$1},
 it is not part of the new @code{$0}.  Finally, the last @code{print}
 statement prints the new @code{$0}.
 
-@cindex @code{FS}, containing @code{^}
-@cindex @code{^} (caret), in @code{FS}
-@cindex dark corner, @code{^}, in @code{FS}
+@cindex @code{FS} variable @subentry containing @code{^}
+@cindex @code{^} (caret) @subentry in @code{FS}
+@cindex dark corner @subentry @code{^}, in @code{FS}
 There is an additional subtlety to be aware of when using regular expressions
 for field splitting.
 It is not well specified in the POSIX standard, or anywhere else, what @samp{^}
@@ -7570,11 +7596,11 @@ $ @kbd{echo 'xxAA  xxBxx  C' |}
 @node Single Character Fields
 @subsection Making Each Character a Separate Field
 
-@cindex common extensions, single character fields
-@cindex extensions, common@comma{} single character fields
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, single-character 
fields
+@cindex common extensions @subentry single character fields
+@cindex extensions @subentry common @subentry single character fields
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry 
single-character fields
 @cindex single-character fields
-@cindex fields, single-character
+@cindex fields @subentry single-character
 There are times when you may want to examine each character
 of a record separately.  This can be done in @command{gawk} by
 simply assigning the null string (@code{""}) to @code{FS}. @value{COMMONEXT}
@@ -7593,8 +7619,8 @@ $ @kbd{echo a b | gawk 'BEGIN @{ FS = "" @}}
 @print{} Field 3 is b
 @end example
 
-@cindex dark corner, @code{FS} as null string
-@cindex @code{FS} variable, as null string
+@cindex dark corner @subentry @code{FS} as null string
+@cindex @code{FS} variable @subentry null string as
 Traditionally, the behavior of @code{FS} equal to @code{""} was not defined.
 In this case, most versions of Unix @command{awk} simply treat the entire 
record
 as only having one field.
@@ -7606,10 +7632,10 @@ behaves this way.
 
 @node Command Line Field Separator
 @subsection Setting @code{FS} from the Command Line
-@cindex @option{-F} option, command-line
-@cindex field separator, on command line
-@cindex command line, @code{FS} on@comma{} setting
-@cindex @code{FS} variable, setting from command line
+@cindex @option{-F} option @subentry command-line
+@cindex field separator @subentry on command line
+@cindex command line @subentry @code{FS} on, setting
+@cindex @code{FS} variable @subentry setting from command line
 
 @code{FS} can be set on the command line.  Use the @option{-F} option to
 do so.  For example:
@@ -7635,9 +7661,9 @@ awk -F\\\\ '@dots{}' files @dots{}
 @end example
 
 @noindent
-@cindex field separator, backslash (@code{\}) as
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), as field separator
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), as field separator
+@cindex field separator @subentry backslash (@code{\}) as
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry as field separator
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry as field separator
 Because @samp{\} is used for quoting in the shell, @command{awk} sees
 @samp{-F\\}.  Then @command{awk} processes the @samp{\\} for escape
 characters (@pxref{Escape Sequences}), finally yielding
@@ -7687,7 +7713,7 @@ separator, instead of the @samp{-} in the phone number 
that was
 originally intended.  This demonstrates why you have to be careful in
 choosing your field and record separators.
 
-@cindex Unix @command{awk}, password files@comma{} field separators and
+@cindex Unix @command{awk} @subentry password files, field separators and
 Perhaps the most common use of a single character as the field separator
 occurs when processing the Unix system password file.  On many Unix
 systems, each user has a separate entry in the system password file, with one
@@ -7697,7 +7723,7 @@ encrypted or shadow password.  (A shadow password is 
indicated by the
 presence of a single @samp{x} in the second field.)  A password file
 entry might look like this:
 
-@cindex Robbins, Arnold
+@cindex Robbins @subentry Arnold
 @example
 arnold:x:2076:10:Arnold Robbins:/home/arnold:/bin/bash
 @end example
@@ -7724,22 +7750,22 @@ awk -F'\n' '@var{program}' @var{files @dots{}}
 @noindent
 When you do this, @code{$1} is the same as @code{$0}.
 
-@cindex sidebar, Changing @code{FS} Does Not Affect the Fields
+@cindex sidebar @subentry Changing @code{FS} Does Not Affect the Fields
 @ifdocbook
 @docbook
 <sidebar><title>Changing @code{FS} Does Not Affect the Fields</title>
 @end docbook
 
 
-@cindex POSIX @command{awk}, field separators and
-@cindex field separator, POSIX and
+@cindex POSIX @command{awk} @subentry field separators and
+@cindex field separator @subentry POSIX and
 According to the POSIX standard, @command{awk} is supposed to behave
 as if each record is split into fields at the time it is read.
 In particular, this means that if you change the value of @code{FS}
 after a record is read, the values of the fields (i.e., how they were split)
 should reflect the old value of @code{FS}, not the new one.
 
-@cindex dark corner, field separators
+@cindex dark corner @subentry field separators
 @cindex @command{sed} utility
 @cindex stream editors
 However, many older implementations of @command{awk} do not work this way.  
Instead,
@@ -7785,15 +7811,15 @@ command prints just the first line of 
@file{/etc/passwd}.)
 
 
 
-@cindex POSIX @command{awk}, field separators and
-@cindex field separator, POSIX and
+@cindex POSIX @command{awk} @subentry field separators and
+@cindex field separator @subentry POSIX and
 According to the POSIX standard, @command{awk} is supposed to behave
 as if each record is split into fields at the time it is read.
 In particular, this means that if you change the value of @code{FS}
 after a record is read, the values of the fields (i.e., how they were split)
 should reflect the old value of @code{FS}, not the new one.
 
-@cindex dark corner, field separators
+@cindex dark corner @subentry field separators
 @cindex @command{sed} utility
 @cindex stream editors
 However, many older implementations of @command{awk} do not work this way.  
Instead,
@@ -7866,7 +7892,7 @@ Each individual character in the record becomes a 
separate field.
 (This is a common extension; it is not specified by the POSIX standard.)
 @end table
 
-@cindex sidebar, @code{FS} and @code{IGNORECASE}
+@cindex sidebar @subentry @code{FS} and @code{IGNORECASE}
 @ifdocbook
 @docbook
 <sidebar><title>@code{FS} and @code{IGNORECASE}</title>
@@ -7930,7 +7956,7 @@ will take effect.
 
 @cindex data, fixed-width
 @cindex fixed-width data
-@cindex advanced features, fixed-width data
+@cindex advanced features @subentry fixed-width data
 
 @c O'Reilly doesn't like it as a note the first thing in the section.
 This @value{SECTION} discusses an advanced
@@ -7963,10 +7989,10 @@ on @code{FS} does not work well in this case.  Although 
a portable
 @code{$0} (@pxref{String Functions}), this is awkward and inefficient
 for a large number of fields.
 
-@cindex troubleshooting, fatal errors, field widths@comma{} specifying
+@cindex troubleshooting @subentry fatal errors @subentry field widths, 
specifying
 @cindex @command{w} utility
 @cindex @code{FIELDWIDTHS} variable
-@cindex @command{gawk}, @code{FIELDWIDTHS} variable in
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry @code{FIELDWIDTHS} variable in
 The splitting of an input record into fixed-width fields is specified by
 assigning a string containing space-separated numbers to the built-in
 variable @code{FIELDWIDTHS}.  Each number specifies the width of the
@@ -8136,7 +8162,7 @@ This @value{SECTION} discusses an advanced
 feature of @command{gawk}.  If you are a novice @command{awk} user,
 you might want to skip it on the first reading.
 
-@cindex advanced features, specifying field content
+@cindex advanced features @subentry specifying field content
 Normally, when using @code{FS}, @command{gawk} defines the fields as the
 parts of the record that occur in between each field separator. In other
 words, @code{FS} defines what a field @emph{is not}, instead of what a field
@@ -8162,7 +8188,7 @@ Robbins,Arnold,"1234 A Pretty Street, 
NE",MyTown,MyState,12345-6789,USA
 @c endfile
 @end example
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, @code{FPAT} variable in
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry @code{FPAT} variable in
 @cindex @code{FPAT} variable
 The @code{FPAT} variable offers a solution for cases like this.
 The value of @code{FPAT} should be a string that provides a regular expression.
@@ -8260,7 +8286,7 @@ available for splitting regular strings (@pxref{String 
Functions}).
 @node Testing field creation
 @section Checking How @command{gawk} Is Splitting Records
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, splitting fields and
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry splitting fields and
 As we've seen, @command{gawk} provides three independent methods to split
 input records into fields.  The mechanism used is based on which of the
 three variables---@code{FS}, @code{FIELDWIDTHS}, or @code{FPAT}---was
@@ -8299,15 +8325,15 @@ example of such a function).
 @section Multiple-Line Records
 
 @cindex multiple-line records
-@cindex records, multiline
-@cindex input, multiline records
-@cindex files, reading, multiline records
-@cindex input, files, See input files
+@cindex records @subentry multiline
+@cindex input @subentry multiline records
+@cindex files @subentry reading @subentry multiline records
+@cindex input, files @seeentry{input files}
 In some databases, a single line cannot conveniently hold all the
 information in one entry.  In such cases, you can use multiline
 records.  The first step in doing this is to choose your data format.
 
-@cindex record separators, with multiline records
+@cindex record separators @subentry with multiline records
 One technique is to use an unusual character or string to separate
 records.  For example, you could use the formfeed character (written
 @samp{\f} in @command{awk}, as in C) to separate them, making each record
@@ -8316,7 +8342,7 @@ a page of the file.  To do this, just set the variable 
@code{RS} to
 other character could equally well be used, as long as it won't be part
 of the data in a record.
 
-@cindex @code{RS} variable, multiline records and
+@cindex @code{RS} variable @subentry multiline records and
 Another technique is to have blank lines separate records.  By a special
 dispensation, an empty string as the value of @code{RS} indicates that
 records are separated by one or more blank lines.  When @code{RS} is set
@@ -8328,7 +8354,7 @@ all act as one record separator.
 whitespace do not count.)
 
 @cindex leftmost longest match
-@cindex matching, leftmost longest
+@cindex matching @subentry leftmost longest
 You can achieve the same effect as @samp{RS = ""} by assigning the
 string @code{"\n\n+"} to @code{RS}. This regexp matches the newline
 at the end of the record and one or more blank lines after the record.
@@ -8339,7 +8365,7 @@ So, the next record doesn't start until
 the first nonblank line that follows---no matter how many blank lines
 appear in a row, they are considered one record separator.
 
-@cindex dark corner, multiline records
+@cindex dark corner @subentry multiline records
 However, there is an important difference between @samp{RS = ""} and
 @samp{RS = "\n\n+"}. In the first case, leading newlines in the input
 @value{DF} are ignored, and if a file ends without extra blank lines
@@ -8347,8 +8373,8 @@ after the last record, the final newline is removed from 
the record.
 In the second case, this special processing is not done.
 @value{DARKCORNER}
 
-@cindex field separator, in multiline records
-@cindex @code{FS}, in multiline records
+@cindex field separator @subentry in multiline records
+@cindex @code{FS} variable @subentry in multiline records
 Now that the input is separated into records, the second step is to
 separate the fields in the records.  One way to do this is to divide each
 of the lines into fields in the normal manner.  This happens by default
@@ -8471,9 +8497,9 @@ Leading and trailing matches of @var{regexp} delimit 
empty records.
 POSIX standard.)
 @end table
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, @code{RT} variable in
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry @code{RT} variable in
 @cindex @code{RT} variable
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, @code{RS}/@code{RT} 
variables
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry 
@code{RS}/@code{RT} variables
 If not in compatibility mode (@pxref{Options}), @command{gawk} sets
 @code{RT} to the input text that matched the value specified by @code{RS}.
 But if the input file ended without any text that matches @code{RS},
@@ -8482,8 +8508,8 @@ then @command{gawk} sets @code{RT} to the null string.
 @node Getline
 @section Explicit Input with @code{getline}
 
-@cindex @code{getline} command, explicit input with
-@cindex input, explicit
+@cindex @code{getline} command @subentry explicit input with
+@cindex input @subentry explicit
 So far we have been getting our input data from @command{awk}'s main
 input stream---either the standard input (usually your keyboard, sometimes
 the output from another program) or the
@@ -8510,11 +8536,11 @@ Parts I and II
 @end ifnotinfo
 and have a good knowledge of how @command{awk} works.
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, @code{ERRNO} variable in
-@cindex @code{ERRNO} variable, with @command{getline} command
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, @code{getline} command
-@cindex @code{getline} command, return values
-@cindex @option{--sandbox} option, input redirection with @code{getline}
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry @code{ERRNO} variable in
+@cindex @code{ERRNO} variable @subentry with @command{getline} command
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry 
@code{getline} command
+@cindex @code{getline} command @subentry return values
+@cindex @option{--sandbox} option @subentry input redirection with 
@code{getline}
 
 The @code{getline} command returns 1 if it finds a record and 0 if
 it encounters the end of the file.  If there is some error in getting
@@ -8637,8 +8663,8 @@ rule in the program.  @xref{Next Statement}.
 
 @node Getline/Variable
 @subsection Using @code{getline} into a Variable
-@cindex @code{getline} into a variable
-@cindex variables, @code{getline} command into@comma{} using
+@cindex @code{getline} command @subentry into a variable
+@cindex variables @subentry @code{getline} command into, using
 
 You can use @samp{getline @var{var}} to read the next record from
 @command{awk}'s input into the variable @var{var}.  No other processing is
@@ -8691,12 +8717,12 @@ the value of @code{NF} do not change.
 @node Getline/File
 @subsection Using @code{getline} from a File
 
-@cindex @code{getline} from a file
+@cindex @code{getline} command @subentry from a file
 @cindex input redirection
-@cindex redirection of input
-@cindex @code{<} (left angle bracket), @code{<} operator (I/O)
-@cindex left angle bracket (@code{<}), @code{<} operator (I/O)
-@cindex operators, input/output
+@cindex redirection @subentry of input
+@cindex @code{<} (left angle bracket) @subentry @code{<} operator (I/O)
+@cindex left angle bracket (@code{<}) @subentry @code{<} operator (I/O)
+@cindex operators @subentry input/output
 Use @samp{getline < @var{file}} to read the next record from @var{file}.
 Here, @var{file} is a string-valued expression that
 specifies the @value{FN}.  @samp{< @var{file}} is called a @dfn{redirection}
@@ -8722,7 +8748,7 @@ the normal manner, so the values of @code{$0} and the 
other fields are
 changed, resulting in a new value of @code{NF}.
 @code{RT} is also set.
 
-@cindex POSIX @command{awk}, @code{<} operator and
+@cindex POSIX @command{awk} @subentry @code{<} operator and
 @c Thanks to Paul Eggert for initial wording here
 According to POSIX, @samp{getline < @var{expression}} is ambiguous if
 @var{expression} contains unparenthesized operators other than
@@ -8733,7 +8759,7 @@ you want your program to be portable to all @command{awk} 
implementations.
 
 @node Getline/Variable/File
 @subsection Using @code{getline} into a Variable from a File
-@cindex variables, @code{getline} command into@comma{} using
+@cindex variables @subentry @code{getline} command into, using
 
 Use @samp{getline @var{var} < @var{file}} to read input
 from the file
@@ -8787,11 +8813,11 @@ Failing that, attention to details would be useful.}
 @author Brian Kernighan
 @end quotation
 
-@cindex @code{|} (vertical bar), @code{|} operator (I/O)
-@cindex vertical bar (@code{|}), @code{|} operator (I/O)
+@cindex @code{|} (vertical bar) @subentry @code{|} operator (I/O)
+@cindex vertical bar (@code{|}) @subentry @code{|} operator (I/O)
 @cindex input pipeline
-@cindex pipe, input
-@cindex operators, input/output
+@cindex pipe @subentry input
+@cindex operators @subentry input/output
 The output of a command can also be piped into @code{getline}, using
 @samp{@var{command} | getline}.  In
 this case, the string @var{command} is run as a shell command and its output
@@ -8838,9 +8864,9 @@ bletch
 @noindent
 the program might produce:
 
-@cindex Robbins, Bill
-@cindex Robbins, Miriam
-@cindex Robbins, Arnold
+@cindex Robbins @subentry Bill
+@cindex Robbins @subentry Miriam
+@cindex Robbins @subentry Arnold
 @example
 foo
 bar
@@ -8861,7 +8887,7 @@ value of @code{NF}, and recomputes the value of 
@code{$0}.  The values of
 @code{NR} and @code{FNR} are not changed.
 @code{RT} is set.
 
-@cindex POSIX @command{awk}, @code{|} I/O operator and
+@cindex POSIX @command{awk} @subentry @code{|} I/O operator and
 @c Thanks to Paul Eggert for initial wording here
 According to POSIX, @samp{@var{expression} | getline} is ambiguous if
 @var{expression} contains unparenthesized operators other than
@@ -8887,7 +8913,7 @@ have to worry.
 
 @node Getline/Variable/Pipe
 @subsection Using @code{getline} into a Variable from a Pipe
-@cindex variables, @code{getline} command into@comma{} using
+@cindex variables @subentry @code{getline} command into, using
 
 When you use @samp{@var{command} | getline @var{var}}, the
 output of @var{command} is sent through a pipe to
@@ -8919,12 +8945,12 @@ program to be portable to other @command{awk} 
implementations.
 
 @node Getline/Coprocess
 @subsection Using @code{getline} from a Coprocess
-@cindex coprocesses, @code{getline} from
-@cindex @code{getline} command, coprocesses@comma{} using from
-@cindex @code{|} (vertical bar), @code{|&} operator (I/O)
-@cindex vertical bar (@code{|}), @code{|&} operator (I/O)
-@cindex operators, input/output
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, input/output operators
+@cindex coprocesses @subentry @code{getline} from
+@cindex @code{getline} command @subentry coprocesses, using from
+@cindex @code{|} (vertical bar) @subentry @code{|&} operator (I/O)
+@cindex vertical bar (@code{|}) @subentry @code{|&} operator (I/O)
+@cindex operators @subentry input/output
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry input/output 
operators
 
 Reading input into @code{getline} from a pipe is a one-way operation.
 The command that is started with @samp{@var{command} | getline} only
@@ -8960,7 +8986,7 @@ where coprocesses are discussed in more detail.
 
 @node Getline/Variable/Coprocess
 @subsection Using @code{getline} into a Variable from a Coprocess
-@cindex variables, @code{getline} command into@comma{} using
+@cindex variables @subentry @code{getline} command into, using
 
 When you use @samp{@var{command} |& getline @var{var}}, the output from
 the coprocess @var{command} is sent through a two-way pipe to @code{getline}
@@ -8990,21 +9016,21 @@ When @code{getline} changes the value of @code{$0} and 
@code{NF},
 program and start testing the new record against every pattern.
 However, the new record is tested against any subsequent rules.
 
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, implementation 
limitations
-@cindex implementation issues, @command{gawk}, limits
-@cindex @command{awk}, implementations, limits
-@cindex @command{gawk}, implementation issues, limits
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry 
implementation limitations
+@cindex implementation issues, @command{gawk} @subentry limits
+@cindex @command{awk} @subentry implementations @subentry limits
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry implementation issues @subentry limits
 @item
 Some very old @command{awk} implementations limit the number of pipelines that 
an @command{awk}
 program may have open to just one.  In @command{gawk}, there is no such limit.
 You can open as many pipelines (and coprocesses) as the underlying operating
 system permits.
 
-@cindex side effects, @code{FILENAME} variable
-@cindex @code{FILENAME} variable, @code{getline}@comma{} setting with
-@cindex dark corner, @code{FILENAME} variable
-@cindex @code{getline} command, @code{FILENAME} variable and
-@cindex @code{BEGIN} pattern, @code{getline} and
+@cindex side effects @subentry @code{FILENAME} variable
+@cindex @code{FILENAME} variable @subentry @code{getline}, setting with
+@cindex dark corner @subentry @code{FILENAME} variable
+@cindex @code{getline} command @subentry @code{FILENAME} variable and
+@cindex @code{BEGIN} pattern @subentry @code{getline} and
 @item
 An interesting side effect occurs if you use @code{getline} without a
 redirection inside a @code{BEGIN} rule. Because an unredirected @code{getline}
@@ -9071,7 +9097,7 @@ know that there is a string value to be assigned.
 
 @node Getline Summary
 @subsection Summary of @code{getline} Variants
-@cindex @code{getline} command, variants
+@cindex @code{getline} command @subentry variants
 
 @ref{table-getline-variants}
 summarizes the eight variants of @code{getline},
@@ -9098,7 +9124,7 @@ Note: for each variant, @command{gawk} sets the @code{RT} 
predefined variable.
 @section Reading Input with a Timeout
 @cindex timeout, reading input
 
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, read timeouts
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry read timeouts
 This @value{SECTION} describes a feature that is specific to @command{gawk}.
 
 You may specify a timeout in milliseconds for reading input from the keyboard,
@@ -9182,6 +9208,8 @@ worth of data the first time. Because of this, changing 
the value
 of timeout like in the preceding example is not very useful.
 @end quotation
 
+@cindex @env{GAWK_READ_TIMEOUT} environment variable
+@cindex environment variables @subentry @env{GAWK_READ_TIMEOUT}
 If the @code{PROCINFO} element is not present and the
 @env{GAWK_READ_TIMEOUT} environment variable exists,
 @command{gawk} uses its value to initialize the timeout value.
@@ -9208,7 +9236,7 @@ indefinitely until some other process opens it for 
writing.
 @section Retrying Reads After Certain Input Errors
 @cindex retrying input
 
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, retrying input
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry retrying 
input
 This @value{SECTION} describes a feature that is specific to @command{gawk}.
 
 When @command{gawk} encounters an error while reading input, by
@@ -9236,9 +9264,9 @@ descriptor has been configured to behave in a 
non-blocking fashion.
 
 @node Command-line directories
 @section Directories on the Command Line
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, command-line 
directories
-@cindex directories, command-line
-@cindex command line, directories on
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry command-line 
directories
+@cindex directories @subentry command-line
+@cindex command line @subentry directories on
 
 According to the POSIX standard, files named on the @command{awk}
 command line must be text files; it is a fatal error if they are not.
@@ -9329,6 +9357,7 @@ from the default input stream, from a file, or from a 
pipe or coprocess.
 Use @code{PROCINFO[@var{file}, "READ_TIMEOUT"]} to cause reads to time out
 for @var{file}.
 
+@cindex POSIX mode
 @item
 Directories on the command line are fatal for standard @command{awk};
 @command{gawk} ignores them if not in POSIX mode.
@@ -9354,7 +9383,7 @@ including abstentions, for each item.
 @chapter Printing Output
 
 @cindex printing
-@cindex output, printing, See printing
+@cindex output, printing @seeentry{printing}
 One of the most common programming actions is to @dfn{print}, or output,
 some or all of the input.  Use the @code{print} statement
 for simple output, and the @code{printf} statement
@@ -9415,8 +9444,8 @@ The items to print can be constant strings or numbers, 
fields of the
 current record (such as @code{$1}), variables, or any @command{awk}
 expression.  Numeric values are converted to strings and then printed.
 
-@cindex records, printing
-@cindex lines, blank, printing
+@cindex records @subentry printing
+@cindex lines @subentry blank, printing
 @cindex text, printing
 The simple statement @samp{print} with no items is equivalent to
 @samp{print $0}: it prints the entire current record.  To print a blank
@@ -9439,7 +9468,7 @@ isn't limited to only one line.  If an item value is a 
string containing a
 newline, the newline is output along with the rest of the string.  A
 single @code{print} statement can make any number of lines this way.
 
-@cindex newlines, printing
+@cindex newlines @subentry printing
 The following is an example of printing a string that contains embedded
 @ifinfo
 newlines
@@ -9466,7 +9495,7 @@ $ @kbd{awk 'BEGIN @{ print "line one\nline two\nline 
three" @}'}
 @end group
 @end example
 
-@cindex fields, printing
+@cindex fields @subentry printing
 The next example, which is run on the @file{inventory-shipped} file,
 prints the first two fields of each input record, with a space between
 them:
@@ -9479,8 +9508,8 @@ $ @kbd{awk '@{ print $1, $2 @}' inventory-shipped}
 @dots{}
 @end example
 
-@cindex @code{print} statement, commas, omitting
-@cindex troubleshooting, @code{print} statement@comma{} omitting commas
+@cindex @code{print} statement @subentry commas, omitting
+@cindex troubleshooting @subentry @code{print} statement, omitting commas
 A common mistake in using the @code{print} statement is to omit the comma
 between two items.  This often has the effect of making the items run
 together in the output, with no space.  The reason for this is that
@@ -9495,7 +9524,7 @@ $ @kbd{awk '@{ print $1 $2 @}' inventory-shipped}
 @dots{}
 @end example
 
-@cindex @code{BEGIN} pattern, headings@comma{} adding
+@cindex @code{BEGIN} pattern @subentry headings, adding
 To someone unfamiliar with the @file{inventory-shipped} file, neither
 example's output makes much sense.  A heading line at the beginning
 would make it clearer.  Let's add some headings to our table of months
@@ -9534,8 +9563,8 @@ awk 'BEGIN @{ print "Month Crates"
 @end group
 @end example
 
-@cindex @code{printf} statement, columns@comma{} aligning
-@cindex columns, aligning
+@cindex @code{printf} statement @subentry columns, aligning
+@cindex columns @subentry aligning
 Lining up columns this way can get pretty
 complicated when there are many columns to fix.  Counting spaces for two
 or three columns is simple, but any more than this can take up
@@ -9543,8 +9572,8 @@ a lot of time. This is why the @code{printf} statement was
 created (@pxref{Printf});
 one of its specialties is lining up columns of data.
 
-@cindex line continuations, in @code{print} statement
-@cindex @code{print} statement, line continuations and
+@cindex line continuations @subentry in @code{print} statement
+@cindex @code{print} statement @subentry line continuations and
 @quotation NOTE
 You can continue either a @code{print} or
 @code{printf} statement simply by putting a newline after any comma
@@ -9570,10 +9599,10 @@ then outputs a string called the @dfn{output record 
separator} (or
 (i.e., a newline character).  Thus, each @code{print} statement normally
 makes a separate line.
 
-@cindex output, records
-@cindex output record separator, See @code{ORS} variable
+@cindex output @subentry records
+@cindex output record separator @seeentry{@code{ORS} variable}
 @cindex @code{ORS} variable
-@cindex @code{BEGIN} pattern, @code{OFS}/@code{ORS} variables, assigning 
values to
+@cindex @code{BEGIN} pattern @subentry @code{OFS}/@code{ORS} variables, 
assigning values to
 In order to change how output fields and records are separated, assign
 new values to the variables @code{OFS} and @code{ORS}.  The usual
 place to do this is in the @code{BEGIN} rule
@@ -9619,8 +9648,8 @@ runs together on a single line.
 
 @node OFMT
 @section Controlling Numeric Output with @code{print}
-@cindex numeric, output format
-@cindex formats@comma{} numeric output
+@cindex numeric @subentry output format
+@cindex formats, numeric output
 When printing numeric values with the @code{print} statement,
 @command{awk} internally converts each number to a string of characters
 and prints that string.  @command{awk} uses the @code{sprintf()} function
@@ -9635,7 +9664,7 @@ more fully in
 
 @cindexawkfunc{sprintf}
 @cindex @code{OFMT} variable
-@cindex output, format specifier@comma{} @code{OFMT}
+@cindex output @subentry format specifier, @code{OFMT}
 The predefined variable @code{OFMT} contains the format specification
 that @code{print} uses with @code{sprintf()} when it wants to convert a
 number to a string for printing.
@@ -9652,9 +9681,9 @@ $ @kbd{awk 'BEGIN @{}
 @end example
 
 @noindent
-@cindex dark corner, @code{OFMT} variable
-@cindex POSIX @command{awk}, @code{OFMT} variable and
-@cindex @code{OFMT} variable, POSIX @command{awk} and
+@cindex dark corner @subentry @code{OFMT} variable
+@cindex POSIX @command{awk} @subentry @code{OFMT} variable and
+@cindex @code{OFMT} variable @subentry POSIX @command{awk} and
 According to the POSIX standard, @command{awk}'s behavior is undefined
 if @code{OFMT} contains anything but a floating-point conversion specification.
 @value{DARKCORNER}
@@ -9663,8 +9692,8 @@ if @code{OFMT} contains anything but a floating-point 
conversion specification.
 @section Using @code{printf} Statements for Fancier Printing
 
 @cindex @code{printf} statement
-@cindex output, formatted
-@cindex formatting output
+@cindex output @subentry formatted
+@cindex formatting @subentry output
 For more precise control over the output format than what is
 provided by @code{print}, use @code{printf}.
 With @code{printf} you can
@@ -9683,7 +9712,7 @@ after the decimal point).
 @node Basic Printf
 @subsection Introduction to the @code{printf} Statement
 
-@cindex @code{printf} statement, syntax of
+@cindex @code{printf} statement @subentry syntax of
 A simple @code{printf} statement looks like this:
 
 @example
@@ -9731,8 +9760,8 @@ the output message.
 
 @node Control Letters
 @subsection Format-Control Letters
-@cindex @code{printf} statement, format-control characters
-@cindex format specifiers, @code{printf} statement
+@cindex @code{printf} statement @subentry format-control characters
+@cindex format specifiers @subentry @code{printf} statement
 
 A format specifier starts with the character @samp{%} and ends with
 a @dfn{format-control letter}---it tells the @code{printf} statement
@@ -9767,8 +9796,8 @@ Print a number as a character; thus, @samp{printf "%c",
 65} outputs the letter @samp{A}. The output for a string value is
 the first character of the string.
 
-@cindex dark corner, format-control characters
-@cindex @command{gawk}, format-control characters
+@cindex dark corner @subentry format-control characters
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry format-control characters
 @quotation NOTE
 The POSIX standard says the first character of a string is printed.
 In locales with multibyte characters, @command{gawk} attempts to
@@ -9866,8 +9895,8 @@ This does not consume an
 argument and it ignores any modifiers.
 @end table
 
-@cindex dark corner, format-control characters
-@cindex @command{gawk}, format-control characters
+@cindex dark corner @subentry format-control characters
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry format-control characters
 @quotation NOTE
 When using the integer format-control letters for values that are
 outside the range of the widest C integer type, @command{gawk} switches to
@@ -9892,8 +9921,8 @@ the IEEE standard.  Further details are provided in
 @node Format Modifiers
 @subsection Modifiers for @code{printf} Formats
 
-@cindex @code{printf} statement, modifiers
-@cindex modifiers@comma{} in format specifiers
+@cindex @code{printf} statement @subentry modifiers
+@cindex modifiers, in format specifiers
 A format specification can also include @dfn{modifiers} that can control
 how much of the item's value is printed, as well as how much space it gets.
 The modifiers come between the @samp{%} and the format-control letter.
@@ -9903,8 +9932,8 @@ spaces in the output. Here are the possible modifiers, in 
the order in
 which they may appear:
 
 @table @asis
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, 
@code{print}/@code{printf} statements
-@cindex @code{printf} statement, positional specifiers
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry 
@code{print}/@code{printf} statements
+@cindex @code{printf} statement @subentry positional specifiers
 @c the code{} does NOT start a secondary
 @cindex positional specifiers, @code{printf} statement
 @item @code{@var{N}$}
@@ -10089,8 +10118,8 @@ printf "%" w "." p "s\n", s
 This is not particularly easy to read, but it does work.
 
 @c @cindex lint checks
-@cindex troubleshooting, fatal errors, @code{printf} format strings
-@cindex POSIX @command{awk}, @code{printf} format strings and
+@cindex troubleshooting @subentry fatal errors @subentry @code{printf} format 
strings
+@cindex POSIX @command{awk} @subentry @code{printf} format strings and
 C programmers may be used to supplying additional modifiers (@samp{h},
 @samp{j}, @samp{l}, @samp{L}, @samp{t}, and @samp{z}) in @code{printf}
 format strings. These are not valid in @command{awk}.  Most @command{awk}
@@ -10182,8 +10211,8 @@ awk 'BEGIN @{ format = "%-10s %s\n"
 @section Redirecting Output of @code{print} and @code{printf}
 
 @cindex output redirection
-@cindex redirection of output
-@cindex @option{--sandbox} option, output redirection with @code{print}, 
@code{printf}
+@cindex redirection @subentry of output
+@cindex @option{--sandbox} option @subentry output redirection with 
@code{print} @subentry @code{printf}
 So far, the output from @code{print} and @code{printf} has gone
 to the standard
 output, usually the screen.  Both @code{print} and @code{printf} can
@@ -10200,17 +10229,17 @@ Redirections in @command{awk} are written just like 
redirections in shell
 commands, except that they are written inside the @command{awk} program.
 
 @c the commas here are part of the see also
-@cindex @code{print} statement, See Also redirection@comma{} of output
-@cindex @code{printf} statement, See Also redirection@comma{} of output
+@cindex @code{print} statement @seealso{redirection of output}
+@cindex @code{printf} statement @seealso{redirection of output}
 There are four forms of output redirection: output to a file, output
 appended to a file, output through a pipe to another command, and output
 to a coprocess.  We show them all for the @code{print} statement,
 but they work identically for @code{printf}:
 
 @table @code
-@cindex @code{>} (right angle bracket), @code{>} operator (I/O)
-@cindex right angle bracket (@code{>}), @code{>} operator (I/O)
-@cindex operators, input/output
+@cindex @code{>} (right angle bracket) @subentry @code{>} operator (I/O)
+@cindex right angle bracket (@code{>}) @subentry @code{>} operator (I/O)
+@cindex operators @subentry input/output
 @item print @var{items} > @var{output-file}
 This redirection prints the items into the output file named
 @var{output-file}.  The @value{FN} @var{output-file} can be any
@@ -10242,8 +10271,8 @@ $ @kbd{cat name-list}
 @noindent
 Each output file contains one name or number per line.
 
-@cindex @code{>} (right angle bracket), @code{>>} operator (I/O)
-@cindex right angle bracket (@code{>}), @code{>>} operator (I/O)
+@cindex @code{>} (right angle bracket) @subentry @code{>>} operator (I/O)
+@cindex right angle bracket (@code{>}) @subentry @code{>>} operator (I/O)
 @item print @var{items} >> @var{output-file}
 This redirection prints the items into the preexisting output file
 named @var{output-file}.  The difference between this and the
@@ -10252,9 +10281,9 @@ single-@samp{>} redirection is that the old contents 
(if any) of
 appended to the file.
 If @var{output-file} does not exist, then it is created.
 
-@cindex @code{|} (vertical bar), @code{|} operator (I/O)
-@cindex pipe, output
-@cindex output, pipes
+@cindex @code{|} (vertical bar) @subentry @code{|} operator (I/O)
+@cindex pipe @subentry output
+@cindex output @subentry pipes
 @item print @var{items} | @var{command}
 It is possible to send output to another program through a pipe
 instead of into a file.   This redirection opens a pipe to
@@ -10309,9 +10338,9 @@ because (if you mean to refer to that same file or 
command)
 every time.
 
 @cindex coprocesses
-@cindex @code{|} (vertical bar), @code{|&} operator (I/O)
-@cindex operators, input/output
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, input/output operators
+@cindex @code{|} (vertical bar) @subentry @code{|&} operator (I/O)
+@cindex operators @subentry input/output
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry input/output 
operators
 @item print @var{items} |& @var{command}
 This redirection prints the items to the input of @var{command}.
 The difference between this and the
@@ -10341,7 +10370,7 @@ asks the system to open a file, pipe, or coprocess only 
if the particular
 @var{file} or @var{command} you specify has not already been written
 to by your program or if it has been closed since it was last written to.
 
-@cindex troubleshooting, printing
+@cindex troubleshooting @subentry printing
 It is a common error to use @samp{>} redirection for the first @code{print}
 to a file, and then to use @samp{>>} for subsequent output:
 
@@ -10362,10 +10391,10 @@ output is produced in the expected order. However, 
mixing the operators
 for the same file is definitely poor style, and is confusing to readers
 of your program.)
 
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, implementation 
limitations
-@cindex implementation issues, @command{gawk}, limits
-@cindex @command{awk}, implementation issues, pipes
-@cindex @command{gawk}, implementation issues, pipes
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry 
implementation limitations
+@cindex implementation issues, @command{gawk} @subentry limits
+@cindex @command{awk} @subentry implementation issues @subentry pipes
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry implementation issues @subentry pipes
 @ifnotinfo
 As mentioned earlier
 (@pxref{Getline Notes}),
@@ -10382,13 +10411,13 @@ program may have open to just one!  In 
@command{gawk}, there is no such limit.
 @command{gawk} allows a program to
 open as many pipelines as the underlying operating system permits.
 
-@cindex sidebar, Piping into @command{sh}
+@cindex sidebar @subentry Piping into @command{sh}
 @ifdocbook
 @docbook
 <sidebar><title>Piping into @command{sh}</title>
 @end docbook
 
-@cindex shells, piping commands into
+@cindex shells @subentry piping commands into
 
 A particularly powerful way to use redirection is to build command lines
 and pipe them into the shell, @command{sh}.  For example, suppose you
@@ -10423,7 +10452,7 @@ command lines to be fed to the shell.
 @center @b{Piping into @command{sh}}
 
 
-@cindex shells, piping commands into
+@cindex shells @subentry piping commands into
 
 A particularly powerful way to use redirection is to build command lines
 and pipe them into the shell, @command{sh}.  For example, suppose you
@@ -10453,13 +10482,13 @@ command lines to be fed to the shell.
 @node Special FD
 @section Special Files for Standard Preopened Data Streams
 @cindex standard input
-@cindex input, standard
+@cindex input @subentry standard
 @cindex standard output
-@cindex output, standard
+@cindex output @subentry standard
 @cindex error output
 @cindex standard error
 @cindex file descriptors
-@cindex files, descriptors, See file descriptors
+@cindex files @subentry descriptors @seeentry{file descriptors}
 
 Running programs conventionally have three input and output streams
 already available to them for reading and writing.  These are known
@@ -10474,7 +10503,7 @@ is typically used for writing error messages; the 
reason there are two separate
 streams, standard output and standard error, is so that they can be
 redirected separately.
 
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, error messages
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry error 
messages
 @cindex error handling
 In traditional implementations of @command{awk}, the only way to write an error
 message to standard error in an @command{awk} program is as follows:
@@ -10517,15 +10546,15 @@ the descriptor that the @value{FN} stands for.  These 
special
 @value{FN}s work for all operating systems that @command{gawk}
 has been ported to, not just those that are POSIX-compliant:
 
-@cindex common extensions, @code{/dev/stdin} special file
-@cindex common extensions, @code{/dev/stdout} special file
-@cindex common extensions, @code{/dev/stderr} special file
-@cindex extensions, common@comma{} @code{/dev/stdin} special file
-@cindex extensions, common@comma{} @code{/dev/stdout} special file
-@cindex extensions, common@comma{} @code{/dev/stderr} special file
-@cindex file names, standard streams in @command{gawk}
+@cindex common extensions @subentry @code{/dev/stdin} special file
+@cindex common extensions @subentry @code{/dev/stdout} special file
+@cindex common extensions @subentry @code{/dev/stderr} special file
+@cindex extensions @subentry common @subentry @code{/dev/stdin} special file
+@cindex extensions @subentry common @subentry @code{/dev/stdout} special file
+@cindex extensions @subentry common @subentry @code{/dev/stderr} special file
+@cindex file names @subentry standard streams in @command{gawk}
 @cindex @code{/dev/@dots{}} special files
-@cindex files, @code{/dev/@dots{}} special files
+@cindex files @subentry @code{/dev/@dots{}} special files
 @cindex @code{/dev/fd/@var{N}} special files (@command{gawk})
 @table @file
 @item /dev/stdin
@@ -10545,7 +10574,7 @@ the proper way to write an error message then becomes:
 print "Serious error detected!" > "/dev/stderr"
 @end example
 
-@cindex troubleshooting, quotes with file names
+@cindex troubleshooting @subentry quotes with file names
 Note the use of quotes around the @value{FN}.
 Like with any other redirection, the value must be a string.
 It is a common error to omit the quotes, which leads
@@ -10558,7 +10587,7 @@ invoked with the @option{--traditional} option 
(@pxref{Options}).
 
 @node Special Files
 @section Special @value{FFN}s in @command{gawk}
-@cindex @command{gawk}, file names in
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry file names in
 
 Besides access to standard input, standard output, and standard error,
 @command{gawk} provides access to any open file descriptor.
@@ -10597,8 +10626,8 @@ above two, does actually close the given file 
descriptor.
 
 @node Special Network
 @subsection Special Files for Network Communications
-@cindex networks, support for
-@cindex TCP/IP, support for
+@cindex networks @subentry support for
+@cindex TCP/IP @subentry support for
 
 @command{gawk} programs
 can open a two-way
@@ -10627,8 +10656,9 @@ Here are some things to bear in mind when using the
 special @value{FN}s that @command{gawk} provides:
 
 @itemize @value{BULLET}
-@cindex compatibility mode (@command{gawk}), file names
-@cindex file names, in compatibility mode
+@cindex compatibility mode (@command{gawk}) @subentry file names
+@cindex file names @subentry in compatibility mode
+@cindex POSIX mode
 @item
 Recognition of the @value{FN}s for the three standard preopened
 files is disabled only in POSIX mode.
@@ -10651,12 +10681,12 @@ Doing so results in unpredictable behavior.
 
 @node Close Files And Pipes
 @section Closing Input and Output Redirections
-@cindex files, output, See output files
-@cindex input files, closing
-@cindex output, files@comma{} closing
-@cindex pipe, closing
-@cindex coprocesses, closing
-@cindex @code{getline} command, coprocesses@comma{} using from
+@cindex files @subentry output @seeentry{output files}
+@cindex input files @subentry closing
+@cindex output @subentry files, closing
+@cindex pipe @subentry closing
+@cindex coprocesses @subentry closing
+@cindex @code{getline} command @subentry coprocesses, using from
 
 If the same @value{FN} or the same shell command is used with @code{getline}
 more than once during the execution of an @command{awk} program
@@ -10758,9 +10788,9 @@ program closes the pipe after each line of output, then 
each line makes
 a separate message.
 @end itemize
 
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, @code{close()} 
function
-@cindex portability, @code{close()} function and
-@cindex @code{close()} function, portability
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry 
@code{close()} function
+@cindex portability @subentry @code{close()} function and
+@cindex @code{close()} function @subentry portability
 If you use more files than the system allows you to have open,
 @command{gawk} attempts to multiplex the available open files among
 your @value{DF}s.  @command{gawk}'s ability to do this depends upon the
@@ -10808,7 +10838,7 @@ It is, more likely, a close of a file that was never 
opened with a
 redirection, so @command{awk} silently does nothing, except return
 a negative value.
 
-@cindex @code{|} (vertical bar), @code{|&} operator (I/O), pipes@comma{} 
closing
+@cindex @code{|} (vertical bar) @subentry @code{|&} operator (I/O) @subentry 
pipes, closing
 When using the @samp{|&} operator to communicate with a coprocess,
 it is occasionally useful to be able to close one end of the two-way
 pipe without closing the other.
@@ -10823,17 +10853,17 @@ delayed until
 @ref{Two-way I/O},
 which describes it in more detail and gives an example.
 
-@cindex sidebar, Using @code{close()}'s Return Value
+@cindex sidebar @subentry Using @code{close()}'s Return Value
 @ifdocbook
 @docbook
 <sidebar><title>Using @code{close()}'s Return Value</title>
 @end docbook
 
-@cindex dark corner, @code{close()} function
-@cindex @code{close()} function, return value
-@cindex return value@comma{} @code{close()} function
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, @code{close()} 
function
-@cindex Unix @command{awk}, @code{close()} function and
+@cindex dark corner @subentry @code{close()} function
+@cindex @code{close()} function @subentry return value
+@cindex return value, @code{close()} function
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry 
@code{close()} function
+@cindex Unix @command{awk} @subentry @code{close()} function and
 
 In many older versions of Unix @command{awk}, the @code{close()} function
 is actually a statement.
@@ -10847,8 +10877,8 @@ command | getline info
 retval = close(command)  # syntax error in many Unix awks
 @end example
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, @code{ERRNO} variable in
-@cindex @code{ERRNO} variable, with @command{close()} function
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry @code{ERRNO} variable in
+@cindex @code{ERRNO} variable @subentry with @command{close()} function
 @command{gawk} treats @code{close()} as a function.
 The return value is @minus{}1 if the argument names something
 that was never opened with a redirection, or if there is
@@ -10877,6 +10907,7 @@ if it fails.
 @end multitable
 @end float
 
+@cindex POSIX mode
 The POSIX standard is very vague; it says that @code{close()}
 returns zero on success and a nonzero value otherwise.  In general,
 different implementations vary in what they report when closing
@@ -10895,11 +10926,11 @@ when closing a pipe.
 @center @b{Using @code{close()}'s Return Value}
 
 
-@cindex dark corner, @code{close()} function
-@cindex @code{close()} function, return value
-@cindex return value@comma{} @code{close()} function
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, @code{close()} 
function
-@cindex Unix @command{awk}, @code{close()} function and
+@cindex dark corner @subentry @code{close()} function
+@cindex @code{close()} function @subentry return value
+@cindex return value, @code{close()} function
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry 
@code{close()} function
+@cindex Unix @command{awk} @subentry @code{close()} function and
 
 In many older versions of Unix @command{awk}, the @code{close()} function
 is actually a statement.
@@ -10913,8 +10944,8 @@ command | getline info
 retval = close(command)  # syntax error in many Unix awks
 @end example
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, @code{ERRNO} variable in
-@cindex @code{ERRNO} variable, with @command{close()} function
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry @code{ERRNO} variable in
+@cindex @code{ERRNO} variable @subentry with @command{close()} function
 @command{gawk} treats @code{close()} as a function.
 The return value is @minus{}1 if the argument names something
 that was never opened with a redirection, or if there is
@@ -10943,6 +10974,7 @@ if it fails.
 @end multitable
 @end float
 
+@cindex POSIX mode
 The POSIX standard is very vague; it says that @code{close()}
 returns zero on success and a nonzero value otherwise.  In general,
 different implementations vary in what they report when closing
@@ -11011,6 +11043,8 @@ For standard output, you may use @code{PROCINFO["-", 
"NONFATAL"]}
 or @code{PROCINFO["/dev/stdout", "NONFATAL"]}.  For standard error, use
 @code{PROCINFO["/dev/stderr", "NONFATAL"]}.
 
+@cindex @env{GAWK_SOCK_RETRIES} environment variable
+@cindex environment variables @subentry @env{GAWK_SOCK_RETRIES}
 When attempting to open a TCP/IP socket (@pxref{TCP/IP Networking}),
 @command{gawk} tries multiple times. The @env{GAWK_SOCK_RETRIES}
 environment variable (@pxref{Other Environment Variables}) allows you to
@@ -11132,7 +11166,7 @@ that provide the values used in expressions.
 @node Constants
 @subsection Constant Expressions
 
-@cindex constants, types of
+@cindex constants @subentry types of
 
 The simplest type of expression is the @dfn{constant}, which always has
 the same value.  There are three types of constants: numeric,
@@ -11151,8 +11185,8 @@ have different forms, but are internally stored in an 
identical manner.
 @node Scalar Constants
 @subsubsection Numeric and String Constants
 
-@cindex constants, numeric
-@cindex numeric constants
+@cindex constants @subentry numeric
+@cindex numeric @subentry constants
 A @dfn{numeric constant} stands for a number.  This number can be an
 integer, a decimal fraction, or a number in scientific (exponential)
 notation.@footnote{The internal representation of all numbers,
@@ -11168,7 +11202,8 @@ have the same value:
 1050e-1
 @end example
 
-@cindex string constants
+@cindex string @subentry constants
+@cindex constants @subentry string
 A @dfn{string constant} consists of a sequence of characters enclosed in
 double quotation marks.  For example:
 
@@ -11177,8 +11212,9 @@ double quotation marks.  For example:
 @end example
 
 @noindent
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, strings
-@cindex strings, length limitations
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry strings
+@cindex strings @subentry length limitations
+@cindex ASCII
 represents the string whose contents are @samp{parrot}.  Strings in
 @command{gawk} can be of any length, and they can contain any of the possible
 eight-bit ASCII characters, including ASCII @sc{nul} (character code zero).
@@ -11217,9 +11253,9 @@ $ @kbd{gawk 'BEGIN @{ print "hello, }
 @print{} gawk: cmd. line:1:               ^ syntax error
 @end example
 
-@cindex dark corner, string continuation
-@cindex strings, continuation across lines
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, strings
+@cindex dark corner @subentry string continuation
+@cindex strings @subentry continuation across lines
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry strings
 Although POSIX doesn't define what happens if you use an escaped
 newline, as in the previous C example, all known versions of
 @command{awk} allow you to do so.  Unfortunately, what each one
@@ -11233,6 +11269,7 @@ $ @kbd{gawk 'BEGIN @{ print "hello, \}
 @print{} hello, world
 @end example
 
+@cindex POSIX mode
 In POSIX mode (@pxref{Options}), @command{gawk} does not
 allow escaped newlines.  Otherwise, it behaves as just described.
 
@@ -11251,8 +11288,8 @@ $ @kbd{nawk 'BEGIN @{ print "hello, \}
 @subsubsection Octal and Hexadecimal Numbers
 @cindex octal numbers
 @cindex hexadecimal numbers
-@cindex numbers, octal
-@cindex numbers, hexadecimal
+@cindex numbers @subentry octal
+@cindex numbers @subentry hexadecimal
 
 In @command{awk}, all numbers are in decimal (i.e., base 10).  Many other
 programming languages allow you to specify numbers in other bases, often
@@ -11297,8 +11334,8 @@ Being able to use octal and hexadecimal constants in 
your programs is most
 useful when working with data that cannot be represented conveniently as
 characters or as regular numbers, such as binary data of various sorts.
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, octal numbers and
-@cindex @command{gawk}, hexadecimal numbers and
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry octal numbers and
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry hexadecimal numbers and
 @command{gawk} allows the use of octal and hexadecimal
 constants in your program text.  However, such numbers in the input data
 are not treated differently; doing so by default would break old
@@ -11325,14 +11362,14 @@ $ @kbd{gawk 'BEGIN @{ print "021 is", 021 ; print 018 
@}'}
 @print{} 18
 @end example
 
-@cindex compatibility mode (@command{gawk}), octal numbers
-@cindex compatibility mode (@command{gawk}), hexadecimal numbers
+@cindex compatibility mode (@command{gawk}) @subentry octal numbers
+@cindex compatibility mode (@command{gawk}) @subentry hexadecimal numbers
 Octal and hexadecimal source code constants are a @command{gawk} extension.
 If @command{gawk} is in compatibility mode
 (@pxref{Options}),
 they are not available.
 
-@cindex sidebar, A Constant's Base Does Not Affect Its Value
+@cindex sidebar @subentry A Constant's Base Does Not Affect Its Value
 @ifdocbook
 @docbook
 <sidebar><title>A Constant's Base Does Not Affect Its Value</title>
@@ -11382,8 +11419,8 @@ $ @kbd{gawk 'BEGIN @{ printf "0x11 is <%s>\n", 0x11 @}'}
 @cindex regexp constants
 @cindex @code{~} (tilde), @code{~} operator
 @cindex tilde (@code{~}), @code{~} operator
-@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point), @code{!~} operator
-@cindex exclamation point (@code{!}), @code{!~} operator
+@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point) @subentry @code{!~} operator
+@cindex exclamation point (@code{!}) @subentry @code{!~} operator
 A @dfn{regexp constant} is a regular expression description enclosed in
 slashes, such as @code{@w{/^beginning and end$/}}.  Most regexps used in
 @command{awk} programs are constant, but the @samp{~} and @samp{!~}
@@ -11408,7 +11445,7 @@ POSIX @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, and then goes 
on to describe
 @node Standard Regexp Constants
 @subsubsection Standard Regular Expression Constants
 
-@cindex dark corner, regexp constants
+@cindex dark corner @subentry regexp constants
 When used on the righthand side of the @samp{~} or @samp{!~}
 operators, a regexp constant merely stands for the regexp that is to be
 matched.
@@ -11446,8 +11483,8 @@ if (/foo/ ~ $1) print "found foo"
 
 @c @cindex automatic warnings
 @c @cindex warnings, automatic
-@cindex @command{gawk}, regexp constants and
-@cindex regexp constants, in @command{gawk}
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry regexp constants and
+@cindex regexp constants @subentry in @command{gawk}
 @noindent
 This code is ``obviously'' testing @code{$1} for a match against the regexp
 @code{/foo/}.  But in fact, the expression @samp{/foo/ ~ $1} really means
@@ -11468,8 +11505,8 @@ matches = /foo/
 assigns either zero or one to the variable @code{matches}, depending
 upon the contents of the current input record.
 
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, regexp constants
-@cindex dark corner, regexp constants, as arguments to user-defined functions
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry regexp 
constants
+@cindex dark corner @subentry regexp constants @subentry as arguments to 
user-defined functions
 @cindexgawkfunc{gensub}
 @cindexawkfunc{sub}
 @cindexawkfunc{gsub}
@@ -11544,7 +11581,7 @@ it would be nice to have regexp constants that
 are @dfn{strongly typed}; in other words, that denote a regexp useful
 for matching, and not an expression.
 
-@cindex values, regexp
+@cindex values @subentry regexp
 @command{gawk} provides this feature.  A strongly typed regexp constant
 looks almost like a regular regexp constant, except that it is preceded
 by an @samp{@@} sign:
@@ -11607,8 +11644,8 @@ value of the original regexp text.
 @node Variables
 @subsection Variables
 
-@cindex variables, user-defined
-@cindex user-defined, variables
+@cindex variables @subentry user-defined
+@cindex user-defined @subentry variables
 @dfn{Variables} are ways of storing values at one point in your program for
 use later in another part of your program.  They can be manipulated
 entirely within the program text, and they can also be assigned values
@@ -11644,8 +11681,8 @@ change a variable's value, and the @code{match()}, 
@code{split()},
 and @code{patsplit()} functions can change the contents of their
 array parameters (@pxref{String Functions}).
 
-@cindex variables, built-in
-@cindex variables, initializing
+@cindex variables @subentry built-in
+@cindex variables @subentry initializing
 A few variables have special built-in meanings, such as @code{FS} (the
 field separator) and @code{NF} (the number of fields in the current input
 record).  @xref{Built-in Variables} for a list of the predefined variables.
@@ -11662,8 +11699,8 @@ which is what you would do in C and in most other 
traditional languages.
 
 @node Assignment Options
 @subsubsection Assigning Variables on the Command Line
-@cindex variables, assigning on command line
-@cindex command line, variables@comma{} assigning on
+@cindex variables @subentry assigning on command line
+@cindex command line @subentry variables, assigning on
 
 Any @command{awk} variable can be set by including a @dfn{variable assignment}
 among the arguments on the command line when @command{awk} is invoked
@@ -11717,7 +11754,7 @@ $ @kbd{awk '@{ print $n @}' n=4 inventory-shipped n=2 
mail-list}
 @dots{}
 @end example
 
-@cindex dark corner, command-line arguments
+@cindex dark corner @subentry command-line arguments
 Command-line arguments are made available for explicit examination by
 the @command{awk} program in the @code{ARGV} array
 (@pxref{ARGC and ARGV}).
@@ -11758,10 +11795,10 @@ this @value{SECTION} discusses this important facet 
of @command{awk}.
 @node Strings And Numbers
 @subsubsection How @command{awk} Converts Between Strings and Numbers
 
-@cindex converting, strings to numbers
-@cindex strings, converting
-@cindex numbers, converting
-@cindex converting, numbers to strings
+@cindex converting @subentry string to numbers
+@cindex strings @subentry converting
+@cindex numbers @subentry converting
+@cindex converting @subentry numbers to strings
 Strings are converted to numbers and numbers are converted to strings, if the 
context
 of the @command{awk} program demands it.  For example, if the value of
 either @code{foo} or @code{bar} in the expression @samp{foo + bar}
@@ -11782,8 +11819,8 @@ the variables @code{two} and @code{three} are converted 
to strings and
 concatenated together.  The resulting string is converted back to the
 number 23, to which 4 is then added.
 
-@cindex null strings, converting numbers to strings
-@cindex type conversion
+@cindex null strings @subentry converting numbers to strings
+@cindex type @subentry conversion
 If, for some reason, you need to force a number to be converted to a
 string, concatenate that number with the empty string, @code{""}.
 To force a string to be converted to a number, add zero to that string.
@@ -11809,7 +11846,7 @@ On most modern machines,
 value exactly.@footnote{Pathological cases can require up to
 752 digits (!), but we doubt that you need to worry about this.}
 
-@cindex dark corner, @code{CONVFMT} variable
+@cindex dark corner @subentry @code{CONVFMT} variable
 Strange results can occur if you set @code{CONVFMT} to a string that doesn't
 tell @code{sprintf()} how to format floating-point numbers in a useful way.
 For example, if you forget the @samp{%} in the format, @command{awk} converts
@@ -11829,16 +11866,16 @@ b = a ""
 @code{b} has the value @code{"12"}, not @code{"12.00"}.
 @value{DARKCORNER}
 
-@cindex sidebar, Pre-POSIX @command{awk} Used @code{OFMT} for String Conversion
+@cindex sidebar @subentry Pre-POSIX @command{awk} Used @code{OFMT} for String 
Conversion
 @ifdocbook
 @docbook
 <sidebar><title>Pre-POSIX @command{awk} Used @code{OFMT} for String 
Conversion</title>
 @end docbook
 
-@cindex POSIX @command{awk}, @code{OFMT} variable and
+@cindex POSIX @command{awk} @subentry @code{OFMT} variable and
 @cindex @code{OFMT} variable
-@cindex portability, new @command{awk} vs.@: old @command{awk}
-@cindex @command{awk}, new vs.@: old, @code{OFMT} variable
+@cindex portability @subentry new @command{awk} vs.@: old @command{awk}
+@cindex @command{awk} @subentry new vs.@: old @subentry @code{OFMT} variable
 Prior to the POSIX standard, @command{awk} used the value
 of @code{OFMT} for converting numbers to strings.  @code{OFMT}
 specifies the output format to use when printing numbers with @code{print}.
@@ -11858,10 +11895,10 @@ of cases, old @command{awk} programs do not change 
their behavior.
 @center @b{Pre-POSIX @command{awk} Used @code{OFMT} for String Conversion}
 
 
-@cindex POSIX @command{awk}, @code{OFMT} variable and
+@cindex POSIX @command{awk} @subentry @code{OFMT} variable and
 @cindex @code{OFMT} variable
-@cindex portability, new @command{awk} vs.@: old @command{awk}
-@cindex @command{awk}, new vs.@: old, @code{OFMT} variable
+@cindex portability @subentry new @command{awk} vs.@: old @command{awk}
+@cindex @command{awk} @subentry new vs.@: old @subentry @code{OFMT} variable
 Prior to the POSIX standard, @command{awk} used the value
 of @code{OFMT} for converting numbers to strings.  @code{OFMT}
 specifies the output format to use when printing numbers with @code{print}.
@@ -11887,7 +11924,7 @@ non-English locales use the comma (@samp{,}) as the 
decimal point
 character. European locales often use either a space or a period as
 the thousands separator, if they have one.
 
-@cindex dark corner, locale's decimal point character
+@cindex dark corner @subentry locale's decimal point character
 The POSIX standard says that @command{awk} always uses the period as the 
decimal
 point when reading the @command{awk} program source code, and for
 command-line variable assignments (@pxref{Other Arguments}).  However,
@@ -11915,6 +11952,7 @@ the decimal point separator.  In the normal @code{"C"} 
locale, @command{gawk}
 treats @samp{4,321} as 4, while in the Danish locale, it's treated
 as the full number including the fractional part, 4.321.
 
+@cindex POSIX mode
 Some earlier versions of @command{gawk} fully complied with this aspect
 of the standard.  However, many users in non-English locales complained
 about this behavior, because their data used a period as the decimal
@@ -11962,7 +12000,7 @@ of the values provided by constants and variables.
 @node Arithmetic Ops
 @subsection Arithmetic Operators
 @cindex arithmetic operators
-@cindex operators, arithmetic
+@cindex operators @subentry arithmetic
 @c @cindex addition
 @c @cindex subtraction
 @c @cindex multiplication
@@ -12001,9 +12039,9 @@ The following list provides the arithmetic operators in 
@command{awk},
 in order from the highest precedence to the lowest:
 
 @table @code
-@cindex common extensions, @code{**} operator
-@cindex extensions, common@comma{} @code{**} operator
-@cindex POSIX @command{awk}, arithmetic operators and
+@cindex common extensions @subentry @code{**} operator
+@cindex extensions @subentry common @subentry @code{**} operator
+@cindex POSIX @command{awk} @subentry arithmetic operators and
 @item @var{x} ^ @var{y}
 @itemx @var{x} ** @var{y}
 Exponentiation; @var{x} raised to the @var{y} power.  @samp{2 ^ 3} has
@@ -12019,7 +12057,7 @@ Unary plus; the expression is converted to a number.
 @item @var{x} * @var{y}
 Multiplication.
 
-@cindex troubleshooting, division
+@cindex troubleshooting @subentry division
 @cindex division
 @item @var{x} / @var{y}
 Division;  because all numbers in @command{awk} are floating-point
@@ -12044,7 +12082,7 @@ Unary plus and minus have the same precedence,
 the multiplication operators all have the same precedence, and
 addition and subtraction have the same precedence.
 
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, trunc-mod operation
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry trunc-mod 
operation
 @cindex trunc-mod operation
 When computing the remainder of @samp{@var{x} % @var{y}},
 the quotient is rounded toward zero to an integer and
@@ -12067,9 +12105,9 @@ In other @command{awk} implementations, the signedness 
of the remainder
 may be machine-dependent.
 @c FIXME !!! what does posix say?
 
-@cindex portability, @code{**} operator and
-@cindex @code{*} (asterisk), @code{**} operator
-@cindex asterisk (@code{*}), @code{**} operator
+@cindex portability @subentry @code{**} operator and
+@cindex @code{*} (asterisk) @subentry @code{**} operator
+@cindex asterisk (@code{*}) @subentry @code{**} operator
 @quotation NOTE
 The POSIX standard only specifies the use of @samp{^}
 for exponentiation.
@@ -12084,8 +12122,8 @@ For maximum portability, do not use the @samp{**} 
operator.
 @author Brian Kernighan
 @end quotation
 
-@cindex string operators
-@cindex operators, string
+@cindex string @subentry operators
+@cindex operators @subentry string
 @cindex concatenating
 There is only one string operation: concatenation.  It does not have a
 specific operator to represent it.  Instead, concatenation is performed by
@@ -12108,7 +12146,7 @@ $ @kbd{awk '@{ print "Field number one:" $1 @}' 
mail-list}
 @dots{}
 @end example
 
-@cindex troubleshooting, string concatenation
+@cindex troubleshooting @subentry string concatenation
 Because string concatenation does not have an explicit operator, it is
 often necessary to ensure that it happens at the right time by using
 parentheses to enclose the items to concatenate.  For example,
@@ -12135,7 +12173,7 @@ print "something meaningful" > (file name)
 @end example
 
 @cindex order of evaluation, concatenation
-@cindex evaluation order, concatenation
+@cindex evaluation order @subentry concatenation
 @cindex side effects
 Parentheses should be used around concatenation in all but the
 most common contexts, such as on the righthand side of @samp{=}.
@@ -12216,10 +12254,10 @@ you're never quite sure what you'll get.
 @node Assignment Ops
 @subsection Assignment Expressions
 @cindex assignment operators
-@cindex operators, assignment
-@cindex expressions, assignment
-@cindex @code{=} (equals sign), @code{=} operator
-@cindex equals sign (@code{=}), @code{=} operator
+@cindex operators @subentry assignment
+@cindex expressions @subentry assignment
+@cindex @code{=} (equals sign) @subentry @code{=} operator
+@cindex equals sign (@code{=}) @subentry @code{=} operator
 An @dfn{assignment} is an expression that stores a (usually different)
 value into a variable.  For example, let's assign the value one to the variable
 @code{z}:
@@ -12242,7 +12280,7 @@ message = "this " thing " is " predicate
 @end example
 
 @noindent
-@cindex side effects, assignment expressions
+@cindex side effects @subentry assignment expressions
 This also illustrates string concatenation.
 The @samp{=} sign is called an @dfn{assignment operator}.  It is the
 simplest assignment operator because the value of the righthand
@@ -12256,8 +12294,8 @@ a @dfn{side effect}.
 
 @cindex lvalues/rvalues
 @cindex rvalues/lvalues
-@cindex assignment operators, lvalues/rvalues
-@cindex operators, assignment
+@cindex assignment operators @subentry lvalues/rvalues
+@cindex operators @subentry assignment
 The lefthand operand of an assignment need not be a variable
 (@pxref{Variables}); it can also be a field
 (@pxref{Changing Fields}) or
@@ -12268,7 +12306,7 @@ The righthand operand may be any expression; it 
produces the new value
 that the assignment stores in the specified variable, field, or array
 element. (Such values are called @dfn{rvalues}.)
 
-@cindex variables, types of
+@cindex variables @subentry types of
 It is important to note that variables do @emph{not} have permanent types.
 A variable's type is simply the type of whatever value was last assigned
 to it.  In the following program fragment, the variable
@@ -12326,8 +12364,8 @@ and then test whether @code{x} equals one.  But this 
style tends to make
 programs hard to read; such nesting of assignments should be avoided,
 except perhaps in a one-shot program.
 
-@cindex @code{+} (plus sign), @code{+=} operator
-@cindex plus sign (@code{+}), @code{+=} operator
+@cindex @code{+} (plus sign) @subentry @code{+=} operator
+@cindex plus sign (@code{+}) @subentry @code{+=} operator
 Aside from @samp{=}, there are several other assignment operators that
 do arithmetic with the old value of the variable.  For example, the
 operator @samp{+=} computes a new value by adding the righthand value
@@ -12370,8 +12408,8 @@ BEGIN  @{
 @end group
 @end example
 
-@cindex operators, assignment, evaluation order
-@cindex assignment operators, evaluation order
+@cindex operators @subentry assignment @subentry evaluation order
+@cindex assignment operators @subentry evaluation order
 @noindent
 The indices of @code{bar} are practically guaranteed to be different, because
 @code{rand()} returns different values each time it is called.
@@ -12404,18 +12442,18 @@ The value of @code{a[3]} could be either two or four.
 case, the righthand operand is an expression whose value is converted
 to a number.
 
-@cindex @code{-} (hyphen), @code{-=} operator
-@cindex hyphen (@code{-}), @code{-=} operator
-@cindex @code{*} (asterisk), @code{*=} operator
-@cindex asterisk (@code{*}), @code{*=} operator
-@cindex @code{/} (forward slash), @code{/=} operator
-@cindex forward slash (@code{/}), @code{/=} operator
-@cindex @code{%} (percent sign), @code{%=} operator
-@cindex percent sign (@code{%}), @code{%=} operator
-@cindex @code{^} (caret), @code{^=} operator
-@cindex caret (@code{^}), @code{^=} operator
-@cindex @code{*} (asterisk), @code{**=} operator
-@cindex asterisk (@code{*}), @code{**=} operator
+@cindex @code{-} (hyphen) @subentry @code{-=} operator
+@cindex hyphen (@code{-}) @subentry @code{-=} operator
+@cindex @code{*} (asterisk) @subentry @code{*=} operator
+@cindex asterisk (@code{*}) @subentry @code{*=} operator
+@cindex @code{/} (forward slash) @subentry @code{/=} operator
+@cindex forward slash (@code{/}) @subentry @code{/=} operator
+@cindex @code{%} (percent sign) @subentry @code{%=} operator
+@cindex percent sign (@code{%}) @subentry @code{%=} operator
+@cindex @code{^} (caret) @subentry @code{^=} operator
+@cindex caret (@code{^}) @subentry @code{^=} operator
+@cindex @code{*} (asterisk) @subentry @code{**=} operator
+@cindex asterisk (@code{*}) @subentry @code{**=} operator
 @float Table,table-assign-ops
 @caption{Arithmetic assignment operators}
 @multitable @columnfractions .30 .70
@@ -12425,37 +12463,37 @@ to a number.
 @item @var{lvalue} @code{*=} @var{coefficient} @tab Multiply the value of 
@var{lvalue} by @var{coefficient}.
 @item @var{lvalue} @code{/=} @var{divisor} @tab Divide the value of 
@var{lvalue} by @var{divisor}.
 @item @var{lvalue} @code{%=} @var{modulus} @tab Set @var{lvalue} to its 
remainder by @var{modulus}.
-@cindex common extensions, @code{**=} operator
-@cindex extensions, common@comma{} @code{**=} operator
-@cindex @command{awk} language, POSIX version
+@cindex common extensions @subentry @code{**=} operator
+@cindex extensions @subentry common @subentry @code{**=} operator
+@cindex @command{awk} @subentry language, POSIX version
 @cindex POSIX @command{awk}
 @item @var{lvalue} @code{^=} @var{power} @tab Raise @var{lvalue} to the power 
@var{power}.
 @item @var{lvalue} @code{**=} @var{power} @tab Raise @var{lvalue} to the power 
@var{power}. @value{COMMONEXT}
 @end multitable
 @end float
 
-@cindex POSIX @command{awk}, @code{**=} operator and
-@cindex portability, @code{**=} operator and
+@cindex POSIX @command{awk} @subentry @code{**=} operator and
+@cindex portability @subentry @code{**=} operator and
 @quotation NOTE
 Only the @samp{^=} operator is specified by POSIX.
 For maximum portability, do not use the @samp{**=} operator.
 @end quotation
 
-@cindex sidebar, Syntactic Ambiguities Between @samp{/=} and Regular 
Expressions
+@cindex sidebar @subentry Syntactic Ambiguities Between @samp{/=} and Regular 
Expressions
 @ifdocbook
 @docbook
 <sidebar><title>Syntactic Ambiguities Between @samp{/=} and Regular 
Expressions</title>
 @end docbook
 
-@cindex dark corner, regexp constants, @code{/=} operator and
-@cindex @code{/} (forward slash), @code{/=} operator, vs. @code{/=@dots{}/} 
regexp constant
-@cindex forward slash (@code{/}), @code{/=} operator, vs. @code{/=@dots{}/} 
regexp constant
-@cindex regexp constants, @code{/=@dots{}/}, @code{/=} operator and
+@cindex dark corner @subentry regexp constants @subentry @code{/=} operator and
+@cindex @code{/} (forward slash) @subentry @code{/=} operator @subentry vs. 
@code{/=@dots{}/} regexp constant
+@cindex forward slash (@code{/}) @subentry @code{/=} operator @subentry vs. 
@code{/=@dots{}/} regexp constant
+@cindex regexp constants @subentry @code{/=@dots{}/} @subentry @code{/=} 
operator and
 
 @c derived from email from  "Nelson H. F. Beebe" <address@hidden>
 @c Date: Mon, 1 Sep 1997 13:38:35 -0600 (MDT)
 
-@cindex dark corner, @code{/=} operator vs. @code{/=@dots{}/} regexp constant
+@cindex dark corner @subentry @code{/=} operator vs. @code{/=@dots{}/} regexp 
constant
 @cindex ambiguity, syntactic: @code{/=} operator vs. @code{/=@dots{}/} regexp 
constant
 @cindex syntactic ambiguity: @code{/=} operator vs. @code{/=@dots{}/} regexp 
constant
 @cindex @code{/=} operator vs. @code{/=@dots{}/} regexp constant
@@ -12493,15 +12531,15 @@ and @command{mawk} also do not.
 @center @b{Syntactic Ambiguities Between @samp{/=} and Regular Expressions}
 
 
-@cindex dark corner, regexp constants, @code{/=} operator and
-@cindex @code{/} (forward slash), @code{/=} operator, vs. @code{/=@dots{}/} 
regexp constant
-@cindex forward slash (@code{/}), @code{/=} operator, vs. @code{/=@dots{}/} 
regexp constant
-@cindex regexp constants, @code{/=@dots{}/}, @code{/=} operator and
+@cindex dark corner @subentry regexp constants @subentry @code{/=} operator and
+@cindex @code{/} (forward slash) @subentry @code{/=} operator @subentry vs. 
@code{/=@dots{}/} regexp constant
+@cindex forward slash (@code{/}) @subentry @code{/=} operator @subentry vs. 
@code{/=@dots{}/} regexp constant
+@cindex regexp constants @subentry @code{/=@dots{}/} @subentry @code{/=} 
operator and
 
 @c derived from email from  "Nelson H. F. Beebe" <address@hidden>
 @c Date: Mon, 1 Sep 1997 13:38:35 -0600 (MDT)
 
-@cindex dark corner, @code{/=} operator vs. @code{/=@dots{}/} regexp constant
+@cindex dark corner @subentry @code{/=} operator vs. @code{/=@dots{}/} regexp 
constant
 @cindex ambiguity, syntactic: @code{/=} operator vs. @code{/=@dots{}/} regexp 
constant
 @cindex syntactic ambiguity: @code{/=} operator vs. @code{/=@dots{}/} regexp 
constant
 @cindex @code{/=} operator vs. @code{/=@dots{}/} regexp constant
@@ -12535,16 +12573,16 @@ and @command{mawk} also do not.
 @subsection Increment and Decrement Operators
 
 @cindex increment operators
-@cindex operators, decrement/increment
+@cindex operators @subentry decrement/increment
 @dfn{Increment} and @dfn{decrement operators} increase or decrease the value of
 a variable by one.  An assignment operator can do the same thing, so
 the increment operators add no power to the @command{awk} language; however, 
they
 are convenient abbreviations for very common operations.
 
 @cindex side effects
-@cindex @code{+} (plus sign), @code{++} operator
-@cindex plus sign (@code{+}), @code{++} operator
-@cindex side effects, decrement/increment operators
+@cindex @code{+} (plus sign) @subentry @code{++} operator
+@cindex plus sign (@code{+}) @subentry @code{++} operator
+@cindex side effects @subentry decrement/increment operators
 The operator used for adding one is written @samp{++}.  It can be used to 
increment
 a variable either before or after taking its value.
 To @dfn{pre-increment} a variable @code{v}, write @samp{++v}.  This adds
@@ -12575,8 +12613,8 @@ long as you stick to numbers that are fairly small 
(less than
 @end ifnotinfo
 @end ifnottex
 
-@cindex @code{$} (dollar sign), incrementing fields and arrays
-@cindex dollar sign (@code{$}), incrementing fields and arrays
+@cindex @code{$} (dollar sign) @subentry incrementing fields and arrays
+@cindex dollar sign (@code{$}) @subentry incrementing fields and arrays
 Fields and array elements are incremented
 just like variables.  (Use @samp{$(i++)} when you want to do a field reference
 and a variable increment at the same time.  The parentheses are necessary
@@ -12589,8 +12627,8 @@ the lvalue to pre-decrement or after it to 
post-decrement.
 Following is a summary of increment and decrement expressions:
 
 @table @code
-@cindex @code{+} (plus sign), @code{++} operator
-@cindex plus sign (@code{+}), @code{++} operator
+@cindex @code{+} (plus sign) @subentry @code{++} operator
+@cindex plus sign (@code{+}) @subentry @code{++} operator
 @item ++@var{lvalue}
 Increment @var{lvalue}, returning the new value as the
 value of the expression.
@@ -12599,8 +12637,8 @@ value of the expression.
 Increment @var{lvalue}, returning the @emph{old} value of @var{lvalue}
 as the value of the expression.
 
-@cindex @code{-} (hyphen), @code{--} operator
-@cindex hyphen (@code{-}), @code{--} operator
+@cindex @code{-} (hyphen) @subentry @code{--} operator
+@cindex hyphen (@code{-}) @subentry @code{--} operator
 @item --@var{lvalue}
 Decrement @var{lvalue}, returning the new value as the
 value of the expression.
@@ -12614,15 +12652,15 @@ as the value of the expression.
 like @samp{@var{lvalue}++}, but instead of adding, it subtracts.)
 @end table
 
-@cindex sidebar, Operator Evaluation Order
+@cindex sidebar @subentry Operator Evaluation Order
 @ifdocbook
 @docbook
 <sidebar><title>Operator Evaluation Order</title>
 @end docbook
 
 @cindex precedence
-@cindex operators, precedence of
-@cindex portability, operators
+@cindex operators @subentry precedence of
+@cindex portability @subentry operators
 @cindex evaluation order
 @cindex Marx, Groucho
 @quotation
@@ -12673,8 +12711,8 @@ You should avoid such things in your own programs.
 
 
 @cindex precedence
-@cindex operators, precedence of
-@cindex portability, operators
+@cindex operators @subentry precedence of
+@cindex portability @subentry operators
 @cindex evaluation order
 @cindex Marx, Groucho
 @quotation
@@ -12767,7 +12805,7 @@ BEGIN @{
 @}
 @end example
 
-@cindex dark corner, @code{"0"} is actually true
+@cindex dark corner @subentry @code{"0"} is actually true
 There is a surprising consequence of the ``nonzero or non-null'' rule:
 the string constant @code{"0"} is actually true, because it is non-null.
 @value{DARKCORNER}
@@ -12783,13 +12821,12 @@ the string constant @code{"0"} is actually true, 
because it is non-null.
 @c leave it alone.
 
 @cindex comparison expressions
-@cindex expressions, comparison
-@cindex expressions, matching, See comparison expressions
-@cindex matching, expressions, See comparison expressions
-@cindex relational operators, See comparison operators
-@cindex operators, relational, See operators@comma{} comparison
-@cindex variable typing
-@cindex variables, types of, comparison expressions and
+@cindex expressions @subentry comparison
+@cindex expressions, matching @seeentry{comparison expressions}
+@cindex matching @subentry expressions @seeentry{comparison expressions}
+@cindex relational operators @seeentry{comparison operators}
+@cindex operators, relational @seeentry{operators, comparison}
+@cindex variables @subentry types of @subentry comparison expressions and
 Unlike in other programming languages, in @command{awk} variables do not have a
 fixed type. Instead, they can be either a number or a string, depending
 upon the value that is assigned to them.
@@ -12883,9 +12920,9 @@ $ @kbd{echo 37 | awk '@{ printf("%s %s < 42\n", $1,}
 Here are the rules for when @command{awk}
 treats data as a number, and for when it treats data as a string.
 
-@cindex numeric, strings
-@cindex strings, numeric
-@cindex POSIX @command{awk}, numeric strings and
+@cindex numeric @subentry strings
+@cindex strings @subentry numeric
+@cindex POSIX @command{awk} @subentry numeric strings and
 The POSIX standard uses the term @dfn{numeric string} for input data that
 looks numeric.  The @samp{37} in the previous example is a numeric string.
 So what is the type of a numeric string? Answer: numeric.
@@ -13097,28 +13134,29 @@ $ @kbd{echo hello 37 | gawk '@{ print typeof($1), 
typeof($2) @}'}
 
 @node Comparison Operators
 @subsubsection Comparison Operators
+@cindex operators @subentry comparison
 
 @dfn{Comparison expressions} compare strings or numbers for
 relationships such as equality.  They are written using @dfn{relational
 operators}, which are a superset of those in C.
 @ref{table-relational-ops} describes them.
 
-@cindex @code{<} (left angle bracket), @code{<} operator
-@cindex left angle bracket (@code{<}), @code{<} operator
-@cindex @code{<} (left angle bracket), @code{<=} operator
-@cindex left angle bracket (@code{<}), @code{<=} operator
-@cindex @code{>} (right angle bracket), @code{>=} operator
-@cindex right angle bracket (@code{>}), @code{>=} operator
-@cindex @code{>} (right angle bracket), @code{>} operator
-@cindex right angle bracket (@code{>}), @code{>} operator
-@cindex @code{=} (equals sign), @code{==} operator
-@cindex equals sign (@code{=}), @code{==} operator
-@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point), @code{!=} operator
-@cindex exclamation point (@code{!}), @code{!=} operator
+@cindex @code{<} (left angle bracket) @subentry @code{<} operator
+@cindex left angle bracket (@code{<}) @subentry @code{<} operator
+@cindex @code{<} (left angle bracket) @subentry @code{<=} operator
+@cindex left angle bracket (@code{<}) @subentry @code{<=} operator
+@cindex @code{>} (right angle bracket) @subentry @code{>=} operator
+@cindex right angle bracket (@code{>}) @subentry @code{>=} operator
+@cindex @code{>} (right angle bracket) @subentry @code{>} operator
+@cindex right angle bracket (@code{>}) @subentry @code{>} operator
+@cindex @code{=} (equals sign) @subentry @code{==} operator
+@cindex equals sign (@code{=}) @subentry @code{==} operator
+@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point) @subentry @code{!=} operator
+@cindex exclamation point (@code{!}) @subentry @code{!=} operator
 @cindex @code{~} (tilde), @code{~} operator
 @cindex tilde (@code{~}), @code{~} operator
-@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point), @code{!~} operator
-@cindex exclamation point (@code{!}), @code{!~} operator
+@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point) @subentry @code{!~} operator
+@cindex exclamation point (@code{!}) @subentry @code{!~} operator
 @cindex @code{in} operator
 @float Table,table-relational-ops
 @caption{Relational operators}
@@ -13147,7 +13185,7 @@ and so on.  Thus, @code{"10"} is less than @code{"9"}.  
If there are two
 strings where one is a prefix of the other, the shorter string is less than
 the longer one.  Thus, @code{"abc"} is less than @code{"abcd"}.
 
-@cindex troubleshooting, @code{==} operator
+@cindex troubleshooting @subentry @code{==} operator
 It is very easy to accidentally mistype the @samp{==} operator and
 leave off one of the @samp{=} characters.  The result is still valid
 @command{awk} code, but the program does not do what is intended:
@@ -13199,7 +13237,7 @@ $ @kbd{echo 1e2 3 | awk '@{ print ($1 < $2) ? "true" : 
"false" @}'}
 @print{} false
 @end example
 
-@cindex comparison expressions, string vs.@: regexp
+@cindex comparison expressions @subentry string vs.@: regexp
 @c @cindex string comparison vs.@: regexp comparison
 @c @cindex regexp comparison vs.@: string comparison
 @noindent
@@ -13231,15 +13269,15 @@ has the value one if @code{x} contains @samp{foo}, 
such as
 
 @cindex @code{~} (tilde), @code{~} operator
 @cindex tilde (@code{~}), @code{~} operator
-@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point), @code{!~} operator
-@cindex exclamation point (@code{!}), @code{!~} operator
+@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point) @subentry @code{!~} operator
+@cindex exclamation point (@code{!}) @subentry @code{!~} operator
 The righthand operand of the @samp{~} and @samp{!~} operators may be
 either a regexp constant (@code{/}@dots{}@code{/}) or an ordinary
 expression. In the latter case, the value of the expression as a string is 
used as a
 dynamic regexp (@pxref{Regexp Usage}; also
 @pxref{Computed Regexps}).
 
-@cindex @command{awk}, regexp constants and
+@cindex @command{awk} @subentry regexp constants and
 @cindex regexp constants
 A constant regular
 expression in slashes by itself is also an expression.
@@ -13267,6 +13305,7 @@ comparison.@footnote{Technically, string comparison is 
supposed to behave
 the same way as if the strings were compared with the C @code{strcoll()}
 function.}
 
+@cindex POSIX mode
 Because this behavior differs considerably from existing practice,
 @command{gawk} only implemented it when in POSIX mode (@pxref{Options}).
 Here is an example to illustrate the difference, in an @code{en_US.UTF-8}
@@ -13298,6 +13337,7 @@ a <= b && a >= b
 @end example
 @end quotation
 
+@cindex POSIX mode
 As of @value{PVERSION} 4.2, @command{gawk} continues to use locale
 collating order for @code{<}, @code{<=}, @code{>}, and @code{>=} only
 in POSIX mode.
@@ -13312,12 +13352,12 @@ and http://austingroupbugs.net/view.php?id=1070.
 @cindex and Boolean-logic operator
 @cindex or Boolean-logic operator
 @cindex not Boolean-logic operator
-@cindex expressions, Boolean
+@cindex expressions @subentry Boolean
 @cindex Boolean expressions
-@cindex operators, Boolean, See Boolean expressions
-@cindex Boolean operators, See Boolean expressions
-@cindex logical operators, See Boolean expressions
-@cindex operators, logical, See Boolean expressions
+@cindex operators, Boolean @seeentry{Boolean expressions}
+@cindex Boolean operators @seeentry{Boolean expressions}
+@cindex logical operators @seeentry{Boolean expressions}
+@cindex operators, logical @seeentry{Boolean expressions}
 
 A @dfn{Boolean expression} is a combination of comparison expressions or
 matching expressions, using the Boolean operators ``or''
@@ -13349,7 +13389,7 @@ both @samp{edu} and @samp{li}:
 if ($0 ~ /edu/ && $0 ~ /li/) print
 @end example
 
-@cindex side effects, Boolean operators
+@cindex side effects @subentry Boolean operators
 The subexpression @var{boolean2} is evaluated only if @var{boolean1}
 is true.  This can make a difference when @var{boolean2} contains
 expressions that have side effects. In the case of @samp{$0 ~ /foo/ &&
@@ -13389,11 +13429,11 @@ BEGIN @{ if (! ("HOME" in ENVIRON))
 @end table
 
 @cindex short-circuit operators
-@cindex operators, short-circuit
-@cindex @code{&} (ampersand), @code{&&} operator
-@cindex ampersand (@code{&}), @code{&&} operator
-@cindex @code{|} (vertical bar), @code{||} operator
-@cindex vertical bar (@code{|}), @code{||} operator
+@cindex operators @subentry short-circuit
+@cindex @code{&} (ampersand) @subentry @code{&&} operator
+@cindex ampersand (@code{&}) @subentry @code{&&} operator
+@cindex @code{|} (vertical bar) @subentry @code{||} operator
+@cindex vertical bar (@code{|}) @subentry @code{||} operator
 The @samp{&&} and @samp{||} operators are called @dfn{short-circuit}
 operators because of the way they work.  Evaluation of the full expression
 is ``short-circuited'' if the result can be determined partway through
@@ -13405,10 +13445,10 @@ by putting a newline after them.  But you cannot put 
a newline in front
 of either of these operators without using backslash continuation
 (@pxref{Statements/Lines}).
 
-@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point), @code{!}  operator
-@cindex exclamation point (@code{!}), @code{!} operator
+@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point) @subentry @code{!}  operator
+@cindex exclamation point (@code{!}) @subentry @code{!} operator
 @cindex newlines
-@cindex variables, flag
+@cindex variables @subentry flag
 @cindex flag variables
 The actual value of an expression using the @samp{!} operator is
 either one or zero, depending upon the truth value of the expression it
@@ -13462,8 +13502,8 @@ The reason it's there is to avoid printing the 
bracketing
 @node Conditional Exp
 @subsection Conditional Expressions
 @cindex conditional expressions
-@cindex expressions, conditional
-@cindex expressions, selecting
+@cindex expressions @subentry conditional
+@cindex expressions @subentry selecting
 
 A @dfn{conditional expression} is a special kind of expression that has
 three operands.  It allows you to use one expression's value to select
@@ -13487,7 +13527,7 @@ For example, the following expression produces the 
absolute value of @code{x}:
 x >= 0 ? x : -x
 @end example
 
-@cindex side effects, conditional expressions
+@cindex side effects @subentry conditional expressions
 Each time the conditional expression is computed, only one of
 @var{if-true-exp} and @var{if-false-exp} is used; the other is ignored.
 This is important when the expressions have side effects.  For example,
@@ -13505,9 +13545,9 @@ and the other is not.
 @xref{Arrays},
 for more information about arrays.
 
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, line continuations
-@cindex line continuations, @command{gawk}
-@cindex @command{gawk}, line continuation in
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry line 
continuations
+@cindex line continuations @subentry @command{gawk}
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry line continuation in
 As a minor @command{gawk} extension,
 a statement that uses @samp{?:} can be continued simply
 by putting a newline after either character.
@@ -13526,7 +13566,7 @@ This enables you to
 ask for it by name at any point in the program.  For
 example, the function @code{sqrt()} computes the square root of a number.
 
-@cindex functions, built-in
+@cindex functions @subentry built-in
 A fixed set of functions are @dfn{built in}, which means they are
 available in every @command{awk} program.  The @code{sqrt()} function is one
 of these.  @xref{Built-in} for a list of built-in
@@ -13537,7 +13577,7 @@ for instructions on how to do this.
 Finally, @command{gawk} lets you write functions in C or C++
 that may be called from your program (@pxref{Dynamic Extensions}).
 
-@cindex arguments, in function calls
+@cindex arguments @subentry in function calls
 The way to use a function is with a @dfn{function call} expression,
 which consists of the function name followed immediately by a list of
 @dfn{arguments} in parentheses.  The arguments are expressions that
@@ -13552,7 +13592,7 @@ atan2(y, x)            @ii{two arguments}
 rand()                 @ii{no arguments}
 @end example
 
-@cindex troubleshooting, function call syntax
+@cindex troubleshooting @subentry function call syntax
 @quotation CAUTION
 Do not put any space between the function name and the opening parenthesis!
 A user-defined function name looks just like the name of a
@@ -13587,7 +13627,7 @@ which is a way to choose the function to call at 
runtime, instead of
 when you write the source code to your program. We defer discussion of
 this feature until later; see @ref{Indirect Calls}.
 
-@cindex side effects, function calls
+@cindex side effects @subentry function calls
 Like every other expression, the function call has a value, often
 called the @dfn{return value}, which is computed by the function
 based on the arguments you give it.  In this example, the return value
@@ -13637,7 +13677,7 @@ $ @kbd{awk -f matchit.awk}
 @node Precedence
 @section Operator Precedence (How Operators Nest)
 @cindex precedence
-@cindex operators, precedence
+@cindex operators @subentry precedence of
 
 @dfn{Operator precedence} determines how operators are grouped when
 different operators appear close by in one expression.  For example,
@@ -13684,47 +13724,47 @@ to lowest precedence:
 @item @code{(}@dots{}@code{)}
 Grouping.
 
-@cindex @code{$} (dollar sign), @code{$} field operator
-@cindex dollar sign (@code{$}), @code{$} field operator
+@cindex @code{$} (dollar sign) @subentry @code{$} field operator
+@cindex dollar sign (@code{$}) @subentry @code{$} field operator
 @item @code{$}
 Field reference.
 
-@cindex @code{+} (plus sign), @code{++} operator
-@cindex plus sign (@code{+}), @code{++} operator
-@cindex @code{-} (hyphen), @code{--} operator
-@cindex hyphen (@code{-}), @code{--} operator
+@cindex @code{+} (plus sign) @subentry @code{++} operator
+@cindex plus sign (@code{+}) @subentry @code{++} operator
+@cindex @code{-} (hyphen) @subentry @code{--} operator
+@cindex hyphen (@code{-}) @subentry @code{--} operator
 @item @code{++ --}
 Increment, decrement.
 
-@cindex @code{^} (caret), @code{^} operator
-@cindex caret (@code{^}), @code{^} operator
-@cindex @code{*} (asterisk), @code{**} operator
-@cindex asterisk (@code{*}), @code{**} operator
+@cindex @code{^} (caret) @subentry @code{^} operator
+@cindex caret (@code{^}) @subentry @code{^} operator
+@cindex @code{*} (asterisk) @subentry @code{**} operator
+@cindex asterisk (@code{*}) @subentry @code{**} operator
 @item @code{^ **}
 Exponentiation.  These operators group right to left.
 
-@cindex @code{+} (plus sign), @code{+} operator
-@cindex plus sign (@code{+}), @code{+} operator
-@cindex @code{-} (hyphen), @code{-} operator
-@cindex hyphen (@code{-}), @code{-} operator
-@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point), @code{!} operator
-@cindex exclamation point (@code{!}), @code{!} operator
+@cindex @code{+} (plus sign) @subentry @code{+} operator
+@cindex plus sign (@code{+}) @subentry @code{+} operator
+@cindex @code{-} (hyphen) @subentry @code{-} operator
+@cindex hyphen (@code{-}) @subentry @code{-} operator
+@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point) @subentry @code{!} operator
+@cindex exclamation point (@code{!}) @subentry @code{!} operator
 @item @code{+ - !}
 Unary plus, minus, logical ``not.''
 
-@cindex @code{*} (asterisk), @code{*} operator, as multiplication operator
-@cindex asterisk (@code{*}), @code{*} operator, as multiplication operator
-@cindex @code{/} (forward slash), @code{/} operator
-@cindex forward slash (@code{/}), @code{/} operator
-@cindex @code{%} (percent sign), @code{%} operator
-@cindex percent sign (@code{%}), @code{%} operator
+@cindex @code{*} (asterisk) @subentry @code{*} operator @subentry as 
multiplication operator
+@cindex asterisk (@code{*}) @subentry @code{*} operator @subentry as 
multiplication operator
+@cindex @code{/} (forward slash) @subentry @code{/} operator
+@cindex forward slash (@code{/}) @subentry @code{/} operator
+@cindex @code{%} (percent sign) @subentry @code{%} operator
+@cindex percent sign (@code{%}) @subentry @code{%} operator
 @item @code{* / %}
 Multiplication, division, remainder.
 
-@cindex @code{+} (plus sign), @code{+} operator
-@cindex plus sign (@code{+}), @code{+} operator
-@cindex @code{-} (hyphen), @code{-} operator
-@cindex hyphen (@code{-}), @code{-} operator
+@cindex @code{+} (plus sign) @subentry @code{+} operator
+@cindex plus sign (@code{+}) @subentry @code{+} operator
+@cindex @code{-} (hyphen) @subentry @code{-} operator
+@cindex hyphen (@code{-}) @subentry @code{-} operator
 @item @code{+ -}
 Addition, subtraction.
 
@@ -13733,35 +13773,35 @@ There is no special symbol for concatenation.
 The operands are simply written side by side
 (@pxref{Concatenation}).
 
-@cindex @code{<} (left angle bracket), @code{<} operator
-@cindex left angle bracket (@code{<}), @code{<} operator
-@cindex @code{<} (left angle bracket), @code{<=} operator
-@cindex left angle bracket (@code{<}), @code{<=} operator
-@cindex @code{>} (right angle bracket), @code{>=} operator
-@cindex right angle bracket (@code{>}), @code{>=} operator
-@cindex @code{>} (right angle bracket), @code{>} operator
-@cindex right angle bracket (@code{>}), @code{>} operator
-@cindex @code{=} (equals sign), @code{==} operator
-@cindex equals sign (@code{=}), @code{==} operator
-@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point), @code{!=} operator
-@cindex exclamation point (@code{!}), @code{!=} operator
-@cindex @code{>} (right angle bracket), @code{>>} operator (I/O)
-@cindex right angle bracket (@code{>}), @code{>>} operator (I/O)
-@cindex operators, input/output
-@cindex @code{|} (vertical bar), @code{|} operator (I/O)
-@cindex vertical bar (@code{|}), @code{|} operator (I/O)
-@cindex operators, input/output
-@cindex @code{|} (vertical bar), @code{|&} operator (I/O)
-@cindex vertical bar (@code{|}), @code{|&} operator (I/O)
-@cindex operators, input/output
+@cindex @code{<} (left angle bracket) @subentry @code{<} operator
+@cindex left angle bracket (@code{<}) @subentry @code{<} operator
+@cindex @code{<} (left angle bracket) @subentry @code{<=} operator
+@cindex left angle bracket (@code{<}) @subentry @code{<=} operator
+@cindex @code{>} (right angle bracket) @subentry @code{>=} operator
+@cindex right angle bracket (@code{>}) @subentry @code{>=} operator
+@cindex @code{>} (right angle bracket) @subentry @code{>} operator
+@cindex right angle bracket (@code{>}) @subentry @code{>} operator
+@cindex @code{=} (equals sign) @subentry @code{==} operator
+@cindex equals sign (@code{=}) @subentry @code{==} operator
+@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point) @subentry @code{!=} operator
+@cindex exclamation point (@code{!}) @subentry @code{!=} operator
+@cindex @code{>} (right angle bracket) @subentry @code{>>} operator (I/O)
+@cindex right angle bracket (@code{>}) @subentry @code{>>} operator (I/O)
+@cindex operators @subentry input/output
+@cindex @code{|} (vertical bar) @subentry @code{|} operator (I/O)
+@cindex vertical bar (@code{|}) @subentry @code{|} operator (I/O)
+@cindex operators @subentry input/output
+@cindex @code{|} (vertical bar) @subentry @code{|&} operator (I/O)
+@cindex vertical bar (@code{|}) @subentry @code{|&} operator (I/O)
+@cindex operators @subentry input/output
 @item @code{< <= == != > >= >> | |&}
 Relational and redirection.
 The relational operators and the redirections have the same precedence
 level.  Characters such as @samp{>} serve both as relationals and as
 redirections; the context distinguishes between the two meanings.
 
-@cindex @code{print} statement, I/O operators in
-@cindex @code{printf} statement, I/O operators in
+@cindex @code{print} statement @subentry I/O operators in
+@cindex @code{printf} statement @subentry I/O operators in
 Note that the I/O redirection operators in @code{print} and @code{printf}
 statements belong to the statement level, not to expressions.  The
 redirection does not produce an expression that could be the operand of
@@ -13773,8 +13813,8 @@ The correct way to write this statement is @samp{print 
foo > (a ? b : c)}.
 
 @cindex @code{~} (tilde), @code{~} operator
 @cindex tilde (@code{~}), @code{~} operator
-@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point), @code{!~} operator
-@cindex exclamation point (@code{!}), @code{!~} operator
+@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point) @subentry @code{!~} operator
+@cindex exclamation point (@code{!}) @subentry @code{!~} operator
 @item @code{~ !~}
 Matching, nonmatching.
 
@@ -13782,43 +13822,43 @@ Matching, nonmatching.
 @item @code{in}
 Array membership.
 
-@cindex @code{&} (ampersand), @code{&&} operator
-@cindex ampersand (@code{&}), @code{&&} operator
+@cindex @code{&} (ampersand) @subentry @code{&&} operator
+@cindex ampersand (@code{&}) @subentry @code{&&} operator
 @item @code{&&}
 Logical ``and.''
 
-@cindex @code{|} (vertical bar), @code{||} operator
-@cindex vertical bar (@code{|}), @code{||} operator
+@cindex @code{|} (vertical bar) @subentry @code{||} operator
+@cindex vertical bar (@code{|}) @subentry @code{||} operator
 @item @code{||}
 Logical ``or.''
 
-@cindex @code{?} (question mark), @code{?:} operator
-@cindex question mark (@code{?}), @code{?:} operator
-@cindex @code{:} (colon), @code{?:} operator
-@cindex colon (@code{:}), @code{?:} operator
+@cindex @code{?} (question mark) @subentry @code{?:} operator
+@cindex question mark (@code{?}) @subentry @code{?:} operator
+@cindex @code{:} (colon) @subentry @code{?:} operator
+@cindex colon (@code{:}) @subentry @code{?:} operator
 @item @code{?:}
 Conditional.  This operator groups right to left.
 
-@cindex @code{+} (plus sign), @code{+=} operator
-@cindex plus sign (@code{+}), @code{+=} operator
-@cindex @code{-} (hyphen), @code{-=} operator
-@cindex hyphen (@code{-}), @code{-=} operator
-@cindex @code{*} (asterisk), @code{*=} operator
-@cindex asterisk (@code{*}), @code{*=} operator
-@cindex @code{*} (asterisk), @code{**=} operator
-@cindex asterisk (@code{*}), @code{**=} operator
-@cindex @code{/} (forward slash), @code{/=} operator
-@cindex forward slash (@code{/}), @code{/=} operator
-@cindex @code{%} (percent sign), @code{%=} operator
-@cindex percent sign (@code{%}), @code{%=} operator
-@cindex @code{^} (caret), @code{^=} operator
-@cindex caret (@code{^}), @code{^=} operator
+@cindex @code{+} (plus sign) @subentry @code{+=} operator
+@cindex plus sign (@code{+}) @subentry @code{+=} operator
+@cindex @code{-} (hyphen) @subentry @code{-=} operator
+@cindex hyphen (@code{-}) @subentry @code{-=} operator
+@cindex @code{*} (asterisk) @subentry @code{*=} operator
+@cindex asterisk (@code{*}) @subentry @code{*=} operator
+@cindex @code{*} (asterisk) @subentry @code{**=} operator
+@cindex asterisk (@code{*}) @subentry @code{**=} operator
+@cindex @code{/} (forward slash) @subentry @code{/=} operator
+@cindex forward slash (@code{/}) @subentry @code{/=} operator
+@cindex @code{%} (percent sign) @subentry @code{%=} operator
+@cindex percent sign (@code{%}) @subentry @code{%=} operator
+@cindex @code{^} (caret) @subentry @code{^=} operator
+@cindex caret (@code{^}) @subentry @code{^=} operator
 @item @code{= += -= *= /= %= ^= **=}
 Assignment.  These operators group right to left.
 @end table
 
-@cindex POSIX @command{awk}, @code{**} operator and
-@cindex portability, operators, not in POSIX @command{awk}
+@cindex POSIX @command{awk} @subentry @code{**} operator and
+@cindex portability @subentry operators @subentry not in POSIX @command{awk}
 @quotation NOTE
 The @samp{|&}, @samp{**}, and @samp{**=} operators are not specified by POSIX.
 For maximum portability, do not use them.
@@ -13965,7 +14005,7 @@ building something useful.
 * Empty::                       The empty pattern, which matches every record.
 @end menu
 
-@cindex patterns, types of
+@cindex patterns @subentry types of
 Patterns in @command{awk} control the execution of rules---a rule is
 executed when its pattern matches the current input record.
 The following is a summary of the types of @command{awk} patterns:
@@ -14006,8 +14046,8 @@ The empty pattern matches every input record.
 
 @node Regexp Patterns
 @subsection Regular Expressions as Patterns
-@cindex patterns, regular expressions as
-@cindex regular expressions, as patterns
+@cindex patterns @subentry regexp constants as
+@cindex regular expressions @subentry as patterns
 
 Regular expressions are one of the first kinds of patterns presented
 in this book.
@@ -14023,8 +14063,8 @@ END            @{ print buzzwords, "buzzwords seen" @}
 
 @node Expression Patterns
 @subsection Expressions as Patterns
-@cindex expressions, as patterns
-@cindex patterns, expressions as
+@cindex expressions @subentry as patterns
+@cindex patterns @subentry expressions as
 
 Any @command{awk} expression is valid as an @command{awk} pattern.
 The pattern matches if the expression's value is nonzero (if a
@@ -14035,8 +14075,8 @@ value depends directly on the new input record's text; 
otherwise, it
 depends on only what has happened so far in the execution of the
 @command{awk} program.
 
-@cindex comparison expressions, as patterns
-@cindex patterns, comparison expressions as
+@cindex comparison expressions @subentry as patterns
+@cindex patterns @subentry comparison expressions as
 Comparison expressions, using the comparison operators described in
 @ref{Typing and Comparison},
 are a very common kind of pattern.
@@ -14049,12 +14089,12 @@ is used as a dynamic regular expression
 The following example prints the second field of each input record
 whose first field is precisely @samp{li}:
 
-@cindex @code{/} (forward slash), patterns and
-@cindex forward slash (@code{/}), patterns and
+@cindex @code{/} (forward slash) @subentry patterns and
+@cindex forward slash (@code{/}) @subentry patterns and
 @cindex @code{~} (tilde), @code{~} operator
 @cindex tilde (@code{~}), @code{~} operator
-@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point), @code{!~} operator
-@cindex exclamation point (@code{!}), @code{!~} operator
+@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point) @subentry @code{!~} operator
+@cindex exclamation point (@code{!}) @subentry @code{!~} operator
 @example
 $ @kbd{awk '$1 == "li" @{ print $2 @}' mail-list}
 @end example
@@ -14070,15 +14110,15 @@ $ @kbd{awk '$1 ~ /li/ @{ print $2 @}' mail-list}
 @print{} 555-6699
 @end example
 
-@cindex regexp constants, as patterns
-@cindex patterns, regexp constants as
+@cindex regexp constants @subentry as patterns
+@cindex patterns @subentry regexp constants as
 A regexp constant as a pattern is also a special case of an expression
 pattern.  The expression @code{/li/} has the value one if @samp{li}
 appears in the current input record. Thus, as a pattern, @code{/li/}
 matches any record containing @samp{li}.
 
-@cindex Boolean expressions, as patterns
-@cindex patterns, Boolean expressions as
+@cindex Boolean expressions @subentry as patterns
+@cindex patterns @subentry Boolean expressions as
 Boolean expressions are also commonly used as patterns.
 Whether the pattern
 matches an input record depends on whether its subexpressions match.
@@ -14120,10 +14160,10 @@ $ @kbd{awk '! /li/' mail-list}
 @end group
 @end example
 
-@cindex @code{BEGIN} pattern, Boolean patterns and
-@cindex @code{END} pattern, Boolean patterns and
-@cindex @code{BEGINFILE} pattern, Boolean patterns and
-@cindex @code{ENDFILE} pattern, Boolean patterns and
+@cindex @code{BEGIN} pattern @subentry Boolean patterns and
+@cindex @code{END} pattern @subentry Boolean patterns and
+@cindex @code{BEGINFILE} pattern @subentry Boolean patterns and
+@cindex @code{ENDFILE} pattern @subentry Boolean patterns and
 The subexpressions of a Boolean operator in a pattern can be constant regular
 expressions, comparisons, or any other @command{awk} expressions.  Range
 patterns are not expressions, so they cannot appear inside Boolean
@@ -14139,8 +14179,8 @@ patterns is described in @ref{Precedence}.
 @subsection Specifying Record Ranges with Patterns
 
 @cindex range patterns
-@cindex patterns, ranges in
-@cindex lines, matching ranges of
+@cindex patterns @subentry ranges in
+@cindex lines @subentry matching ranges of
 @cindex @code{,} (comma), in range patterns
 @cindex comma (@code{,}), in range patterns
 A @dfn{range pattern} is made of two patterns separated by a comma, in
@@ -14165,7 +14205,7 @@ input record; when this succeeds, the range pattern is 
@dfn{turned off} again
 for the following record.  Then the range pattern goes back to checking
 @var{begpat} against each record.
 
-@cindex @code{if} statement, actions@comma{} changing
+@cindex @code{if} statement @subentry actions, changing
 The record that turns on the range pattern and the one that turns it
 off both match the range pattern.  If you don't want to operate on
 these records, you can write @code{if} statements in the rule's action
@@ -14190,13 +14230,13 @@ looks like this:
 @end example
 
 @noindent
-@cindex lines, skipping between markers
+@cindex lines @subentry skipping between markers
 @c @cindex flag variables
 This program fails because the range pattern is both turned on and turned off
 by the first line, which just has a @samp{%} on it.  To accomplish this task,
 write the program in the following manner, using a flag:
 
-@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point), @code{!} operator
+@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point) @subentry @code{!} operator
 @example
 /^%$/     @{ skip = ! skip; next @}
 skip == 1 @{ next @} # skip lines with `skip' set
@@ -14221,8 +14261,8 @@ $ @kbd{echo Yes | gawk '(/1/,/2/) || /Yes/'}
 @error{} gawk: cmd. line:1:           ^ syntax error
 @end example
 
-@cindex range patterns, line continuation and
-@cindex dark corner, range patterns, line continuation and
+@cindex range patterns @subentry line continuation and
+@cindex dark corner @subentry range patterns, line continuation and
 As a minor point of interest, although it is poor style,
 POSIX allows you to put a newline after the comma in
 a range pattern.  @value{DARKCORNER}
@@ -14264,8 +14304,8 @@ $ @kbd{awk '}
 @print{} "li" appears in 4 records.
 @end example
 
-@cindex @code{BEGIN} pattern, operators and
-@cindex @code{END} pattern, operators and
+@cindex @code{BEGIN} pattern @subentry operators and
+@cindex @code{END} pattern @subentry operators and
 This program finds the number of records in the input file @file{mail-list}
 that contain the string @samp{li}.  The @code{BEGIN} rule prints a title
 for the report.  There is no need to use the @code{BEGIN} rule to
@@ -14313,7 +14353,7 @@ rule checks the @code{FNR} and @code{NR} variables.
 @node I/O And BEGIN/END
 @subsubsection Input/Output from @code{BEGIN} and @code{END} Rules
 
-@cindex input/output, from @code{BEGIN} and @code{END}
+@cindex input/output @subentry from @code{BEGIN} and @code{END}
 There are several (sometimes subtle) points to be aware of when doing I/O
 from a @code{BEGIN} or @code{END} rule.
 The first has to do with the value of @code{$0} in a @code{BEGIN}
@@ -14326,11 +14366,11 @@ without a variable (@pxref{Getline}).
 Another way is simply to assign a value to @code{$0}.
 
 @cindex Brian Kernighan's @command{awk}
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, 
@code{BEGIN}/@code{END} patterns
-@cindex POSIX @command{awk}, @code{BEGIN}/@code{END} patterns
-@cindex @code{print} statement, @code{BEGIN}/@code{END} patterns and
-@cindex @code{BEGIN} pattern, @code{print} statement and
-@cindex @code{END} pattern, @code{print} statement and
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry 
@code{BEGIN}/@code{END} patterns
+@cindex POSIX @command{awk} @subentry @code{BEGIN}/@code{END} patterns
+@cindex @code{print} statement @subentry @code{BEGIN}/@code{END} patterns and
+@cindex @code{BEGIN} pattern @subentry @code{print} statement and
+@cindex @code{END} pattern @subentry @code{print} statement and
 The second point is similar to the first, but from the other direction.
 Traditionally, due largely to implementation issues, @code{$0} and
 @code{NF} were @emph{undefined} inside an @code{END} rule.
@@ -14353,10 +14393,10 @@ this in @code{BEGIN} rules, it is a very bad idea in 
@code{END} rules,
 at least in @command{gawk}.  It is also poor style, because if an empty
 line is needed in the output, the program should print one explicitly.
 
-@cindex @code{next} statement, @code{BEGIN}/@code{END} patterns and
-@cindex @code{nextfile} statement, @code{BEGIN}/@code{END} patterns and
-@cindex @code{BEGIN} pattern, @code{next}/@code{nextfile} statements and
-@cindex @code{END} pattern, @code{next}/@code{nextfile} statements and
+@cindex @code{next} statement @subentry @code{BEGIN}/@code{END} patterns and
+@cindex @code{nextfile} statement @subentry @code{BEGIN}/@code{END} patterns 
and
+@cindex @code{BEGIN} pattern @subentry @code{next}/@code{nextfile} statements 
and
+@cindex @code{END} pattern @subentry @code{next}/@code{nextfile} statements and
 Finally, the @code{next} and @code{nextfile} statements are not allowed
 in a @code{BEGIN} rule, because the implicit
 read-a-record-and-match-against-the-rules loop has not started yet.  
Similarly, those statements
@@ -14373,7 +14413,7 @@ are not valid in an @code{END} rule, because all the 
input has been read.
 @subsection The @code{BEGINFILE} and @code{ENDFILE} Special Patterns
 @cindex @code{BEGINFILE} pattern
 @cindex @code{ENDFILE} pattern
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, 
@code{BEGINFILE}/@code{ENDFILE} patterns
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry 
@code{BEGINFILE}/@code{ENDFILE} patterns
 
 This @value{SECTION} describes a @command{gawk}-specific feature.
 
@@ -14408,9 +14448,9 @@ file named on the command line cannot be opened for 
reading.  However,
 you can bypass the fatal error and move on to the next file on the
 command line.
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, @code{ERRNO} variable in
-@cindex @code{ERRNO} variable, with @code{BEGINFILE} pattern
-@cindex @code{nextfile} statement, @code{BEGINFILE}/@code{ENDFILE} patterns and
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry @code{ERRNO} variable in
+@cindex @code{ERRNO} variable @subentry with @code{BEGINFILE} pattern
+@cindex @code{nextfile} statement @subentry @code{BEGINFILE}/@code{ENDFILE} 
patterns and
 You do this by checking if the @code{ERRNO} variable is not the empty
 string; if so, then @command{gawk} was not able to open the file. In
 this case, your program can execute the @code{nextfile} statement
@@ -14437,13 +14477,13 @@ rule is present, the error becomes non-fatal, and 
instead @code{ERRNO}
 is set.  This makes it possible to catch and process I/O errors at the
 level of the @command{awk} program.
 
-@cindex @code{next} statement, @code{BEGINFILE}/@code{ENDFILE} patterns and
+@cindex @code{next} statement @subentry @code{BEGINFILE}/@code{ENDFILE} 
patterns and
 The @code{next} statement (@pxref{Next Statement}) is not allowed inside
 either a @code{BEGINFILE} or an @code{ENDFILE} rule.  The @code{nextfile}
 statement is allowed only inside a
 @code{BEGINFILE} rule, not inside an @code{ENDFILE} rule.
 
-@cindex @code{getline} statement, @code{BEGINFILE}/@code{ENDFILE} patterns and
+@cindex @code{getline} command @subentry @code{BEGINFILE}/@code{ENDFILE} 
patterns and
 The @code{getline} statement (@pxref{Getline}) is restricted inside
 both @code{BEGINFILE} and @code{ENDFILE}: only redirected
 forms of @code{getline} are allowed.
@@ -14478,7 +14518,7 @@ rule to grab it before moving on to the next file.]
 @subsection The Empty Pattern
 
 @cindex empty pattern
-@cindex patterns, empty
+@cindex patterns @subentry empty
 An empty (i.e., nonexistent) pattern is considered to match @emph{every}
 input record.  For example, the program:
 
@@ -14491,8 +14531,8 @@ prints the first field of every record.
 
 @node Using Shell Variables
 @section Using Shell Variables in Programs
-@cindex shells, variables
-@cindex @command{awk} programs, shell variables in
+@cindex shells @subentry variables
+@cindex @command{awk} programs @subentry shell variables in
 @c @cindex shell and @command{awk} interaction
 
 @command{awk} programs are often used as components in larger
@@ -14502,7 +14542,7 @@ hold a pattern that the @command{awk} program searches 
for.
 There are two ways to get the value of the shell variable
 into the body of the @command{awk} program.
 
-@cindex shells, quoting
+@cindex shells @subentry quoting
 A common method is to use shell quoting to substitute
 the variable's value into the program inside the script.
 For example, consider the following program:
@@ -14578,12 +14618,12 @@ in outline, an @command{awk} program generally looks 
like this:
 @dots{}
 @end display
 
-@cindex @code{@{@}} (braces), actions and
-@cindex braces (@code{@{@}}), actions and
-@cindex separators, for statements in actions
-@cindex newlines, separating statements in actions
-@cindex @code{;} (semicolon), separating statements in actions
-@cindex semicolon (@code{;}), separating statements in actions
+@cindex @code{@{@}} (braces) @subentry actions and
+@cindex braces (@code{@{@}}) @subentry actions and
+@cindex separators @subentry for statements in actions
+@cindex newlines @subentry separating statements in actions
+@cindex @code{;} (semicolon) @subentry separating statements in actions
+@cindex semicolon (@code{;}) @subentry separating statements in actions
 An action consists of one or more @command{awk} @dfn{statements}, enclosed
 in braces (@samp{@{@r{@dots{}}@}}).  Each statement specifies one
 thing to do.  The statements are separated by newlines or semicolons.
@@ -14600,7 +14640,7 @@ well.  An omitted action is equivalent to @samp{@{ 
print $0 @}}:
 The following types of statements are supported in @command{awk}:
 
 @table @asis
-@cindex side effects, statements
+@cindex side effects @subentry statements
 @item Expressions
 Call functions or assign values to variables
 (@pxref{Expressions}).  Executing
@@ -14639,21 +14679,21 @@ For deleting array elements.
 @node Statements
 @section Control Statements in Actions
 @cindex control statements
-@cindex statements, control, in actions
-@cindex actions, control statements in
+@cindex statements @subentry control, in actions
+@cindex actions @subentry control statements in
 
 @dfn{Control statements}, such as @code{if}, @code{while}, and so on,
 control the flow of execution in @command{awk} programs.  Most of 
@command{awk}'s
 control statements are patterned after similar statements in C.
 
-@cindex compound statements@comma{} control statements and
-@cindex statements, compound@comma{} control statements and
-@cindex body, in actions
-@cindex @code{@{@}} (braces), statements, grouping
-@cindex braces (@code{@{@}}), statements, grouping
-@cindex newlines, separating statements in actions
-@cindex @code{;} (semicolon), separating statements in actions
-@cindex semicolon (@code{;}), separating statements in actions
+@cindex compound statements, control statements and
+@cindex statements @subentry compound, control statements and
+@cindex body @subentry in actions
+@cindex @code{@{@}} (braces) @subentry statements, grouping
+@cindex braces (@code{@{@}}) @subentry statements, grouping
+@cindex newlines @subentry separating statements in actions
+@cindex @code{;} (semicolon) @subentry separating statements in actions
+@cindex semicolon (@code{;}) @subentry separating statements in actions
 All the control statements start with special keywords, such as @code{if}
 and @code{while}, to distinguish them from simple expressions.
 Many control statements contain other statements.  For example, the
@@ -14735,8 +14775,8 @@ the first thing on its line.
 @subsection The @code{while} Statement
 @cindex @code{while} statement
 @cindex loops
-@cindex loops, @code{while}
-@cindex loops, See Also @code{while} statement
+@cindex loops @subentry @code{while}
+@cindex loops @seealso{@code{while} statement}
 
 In programming, a @dfn{loop} is a part of a program that can
 be executed two or more times in succession.
@@ -14749,7 +14789,7 @@ while (@var{condition})
   @var{body}
 @end example
 
-@cindex body, in loops
+@cindex body @subentry in loops
 @noindent
 @var{body} is a statement called the @dfn{body} of the loop,
 and @var{condition} is an expression that controls how long the loop
@@ -14797,7 +14837,7 @@ program is harder to read without it.
 @node Do Statement
 @subsection The @code{do}-@code{while} Statement
 @cindex @code{do}-@code{while} statement
-@cindex loops, @code{do}-@code{while}
+@cindex loops @subentry @code{do}-@code{while}
 
 The @code{do} loop is a variation of the @code{while} looping statement.
 The @code{do} loop executes the @var{body} once and then repeats the
@@ -14843,7 +14883,7 @@ occasionally is there a real use for a @code{do} 
statement.
 @node For Statement
 @subsection The @code{for} Statement
 @cindex @code{for} statement
-@cindex loops, @code{for}, iterative
+@cindex loops @subentry @code{for} @subentry iterative
 
 The @code{for} statement makes it more convenient to count iterations of a
 loop.  The general form of the @code{for} statement looks like this:
@@ -14918,7 +14958,7 @@ while (@var{condition}) @{
 @}
 @end example
 
-@cindex loops, @code{continue} statements and
+@cindex loops @subentry @code{continue} statement and
 @noindent
 The only exception is when the @code{continue} statement
 (@pxref{Continue Statement}) is used
@@ -15020,8 +15060,8 @@ described in @ref{Getopt Function}.)
 @node Break Statement
 @subsection The @code{break} Statement
 @cindex @code{break} statement
-@cindex loops, exiting
-@cindex loops, @code{break} statement and
+@cindex loops @subentry exiting
+@cindex loops @subentry @code{break} statement and
 
 The @code{break} statement jumps out of the innermost @code{for},
 @code{while}, or @code{do} loop that encloses it.  The following example
@@ -15082,9 +15122,9 @@ This is discussed in @ref{Switch Statement}.
 @c @cindex @code{break}, outside of loops
 @c @cindex historical features
 @c @cindex @command{awk} language, POSIX version
-@cindex POSIX @command{awk}, @code{break} statement and
-@cindex dark corner, @code{break} statement
-@cindex @command{gawk}, @code{break} statement in
+@cindex POSIX @command{awk} @subentry @code{break} statement and
+@cindex dark corner @subentry @code{break} statement
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry @code{break} statement in
 @cindex Brian Kernighan's @command{awk}
 The @code{break} statement has no meaning when
 used outside the body of a loop or @code{switch}.
@@ -15148,9 +15188,9 @@ the increment (@samp{x++}) is never reached.
 @c @cindex @code{continue}, outside of loops
 @c @cindex historical features
 @c @cindex @command{awk} language, POSIX version
-@cindex POSIX @command{awk}, @code{continue} statement and
-@cindex dark corner, @code{continue} statement
-@cindex @command{gawk}, @code{continue} statement in
+@cindex POSIX @command{awk} @subentry @code{continue} statement and
+@cindex dark corner @subentry @code{continue} statement
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry @code{continue} statement in
 @cindex Brian Kernighan's @command{awk}
 The @code{continue} statement has no special meaning with respect to the
 @code{switch} statement, nor does it have any meaning when used outside the
@@ -15183,7 +15223,7 @@ Contrast this with the effect of the @code{getline} 
function
 flow of control in any way (i.e., the rest of the current action executes
 with a new input record).
 
-@cindex @command{awk} programs, execution of
+@cindex @command{awk} programs @subentry execution of
 At the highest level, @command{awk} program execution is a loop that reads
 an input record and then tests each rule's pattern against it.  If you
 think of this loop as a @code{for} statement whose body contains the
@@ -15218,13 +15258,13 @@ then the code in any @code{END} rules is executed.
 The @code{next} statement is not allowed inside @code{BEGINFILE} and
 @code{ENDFILE} rules. @xref{BEGINFILE/ENDFILE}.
 
-@c @cindex @command{awk} language, POSIX version
 @c @cindex @code{next}, inside a user-defined function
-@cindex @code{BEGIN} pattern, @code{next}/@code{nextfile} statements and
-@cindex @code{END} pattern, @code{next}/@code{nextfile} statements and
-@cindex POSIX @command{awk}, @code{next}/@code{nextfile} statements and
-@cindex @code{next} statement, user-defined functions and
-@cindex functions, user-defined, @code{next}/@code{nextfile} statements and
+@cindex @command{awk} @subentry language, POSIX version
+@cindex @code{BEGIN} pattern @subentry @code{next}/@code{nextfile} statements 
and
+@cindex @code{END} pattern @subentry @code{next}/@code{nextfile} statements and
+@cindex POSIX @command{awk} @subentry @code{next}/@code{nextfile} statements 
and
+@cindex @code{next} statement @subentry user-defined functions and
+@cindex functions @subentry user-defined @subentry @code{next}/@code{nextfile} 
statements and
 According to the POSIX standard, the behavior is undefined if the
 @code{next} statement is used in a @code{BEGIN} or @code{END} rule.
 @command{gawk} treats it as a syntax error.  Although POSIX does not disallow 
it,
@@ -15287,8 +15327,8 @@ inclusion into the POSIX standard.
 See @uref{http://austingroupbugs.net/view.php?id=607, the Austin Group 
website}.
 @end quotation
 
-@cindex functions, user-defined, @code{next}/@code{nextfile} statements and
-@cindex @code{nextfile} statement, user-defined functions and
+@cindex functions @subentry user-defined @subentry @code{next}/@code{nextfile} 
statements and
+@cindex @code{nextfile} statement @subentry user-defined functions and
 @cindex Brian Kernighan's @command{awk}
 @cindex @command{mawk} utility
 The current version of BWK @command{awk} and @command{mawk}
@@ -15310,8 +15350,8 @@ is ignored.  The @code{exit} statement is written as 
follows:
 @code{exit} [@var{return code}]
 @end display
 
-@cindex @code{BEGIN} pattern, @code{exit} statement and
-@cindex @code{END} pattern, @code{exit} statement and
+@cindex @code{BEGIN} pattern @subentry @code{exit} statement and
+@cindex @code{END} pattern @subentry @code{exit} statement and
 When an @code{exit} statement is executed from a @code{BEGIN} rule, the
 program stops processing everything immediately.  No input records are
 read.  However, if an @code{END} rule is present,
@@ -15334,7 +15374,7 @@ the @code{END} rule.
 @xref{Assert Function}
 for an example that does this.
 
-@cindex dark corner, @code{exit} statement
+@cindex dark corner @subentry @code{exit} statement
 If an argument is supplied to @code{exit}, its value is used as the exit
 status code for the @command{awk} process.  If no argument is supplied,
 @code{exit} causes @command{awk} to return a ``success'' status.
@@ -15344,7 +15384,7 @@ called a second time from an @code{END} rule with no 
argument,
 @command{awk} uses the previously supplied exit value.  @value{DARKCORNER}
 @xref{Exit Status} for more information.
 
-@cindex programming conventions, @code{exit} statement
+@cindex programming conventions @subentry @code{exit} statement
 For example, suppose an error condition occurs that is difficult or
 impossible to handle.  Conventionally, programs report this by
 exiting with a nonzero status.  An @command{awk} program can do this
@@ -15376,7 +15416,7 @@ results across different operating systems.
 @node Built-in Variables
 @section Predefined Variables
 @cindex predefined variables
-@cindex variables, predefined
+@cindex variables @subentry predefined
 
 Most @command{awk} variables are available to use for your own
 purposes; they never change unless your program assigns values to
@@ -15387,7 +15427,7 @@ to tell @command{awk} how to do certain things.  Others 
are set
 automatically by @command{awk}, so that they carry information from the
 internal workings of @command{awk} to your program.
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, predefined variables and
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry predefined variables and
 This @value{SECTION} documents all of @command{gawk}'s predefined variables,
 most of which are also documented in the @value{CHAPTER}s describing
 their areas of activity.
@@ -15402,7 +15442,7 @@ their areas of activity.
 
 @node User-modified
 @subsection Built-in Variables That Control @command{awk}
-@cindex predefined variables, user-modifiable
+@cindex predefined variables @subentry user-modifiable
 @cindex user-modifiable variables
 
 The following is an alphabetical list of variables that you can change to
@@ -15417,8 +15457,8 @@ in the description of each variable.)
 @table @code
 @cindex @code{BINMODE} variable
 @cindex binary input/output
-@cindex input/output, binary
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, @code{BINMODE} 
variable
+@cindex input/output @subentry binary
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry 
@code{BINMODE} variable
 @item BINMODE #
 On non-POSIX systems, this variable specifies use of binary mode
 for all I/O.  Numeric values of one, two, or three specify that input
@@ -15434,9 +15474,9 @@ detail in @ref{PC Using}.  @command{mawk} (@pxref{Other 
Versions})
 also supports this variable, but only using numeric values.
 
 @cindex @code{CONVFMT} variable
-@cindex POSIX @command{awk}, @code{CONVFMT} variable and
-@cindex numbers, converting, to strings
-@cindex strings, converting, numbers to
+@cindex POSIX @command{awk} @subentry @code{CONVFMT} variable and
+@cindex numbers @subentry converting @subentry to strings
+@cindex strings @subentry converting @subentry numbers to
 @item @code{CONVFMT}
 A string that controls the conversion of numbers to
 strings (@pxref{Conversion}).
@@ -15446,11 +15486,11 @@ It works by being passed, in effect, as the first 
argument to the
 Its default value is @code{"%.6g"}.
 @code{CONVFMT} was introduced by the POSIX standard.
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, @code{FIELDWIDTHS} variable in
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry @code{FIELDWIDTHS} variable in
 @cindex @code{FIELDWIDTHS} variable
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, @code{FIELDWIDTHS} 
variable
-@cindex field separators, @code{FIELDWIDTHS} variable and
-@cindex separators, field, @code{FIELDWIDTHS} variable and
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry 
@code{FIELDWIDTHS} variable
+@cindex field separator @subentry @code{FIELDWIDTHS} variable and
+@cindex separators @subentry field @subentry @code{FIELDWIDTHS} variable and
 @item FIELDWIDTHS #
 A space-separated list of columns that tells @command{gawk}
 how to split input with fixed columnar boundaries.
@@ -15461,11 +15501,11 @@ Assigning a value to @code{FIELDWIDTHS}
 overrides the use of @code{FS} and @code{FPAT} for field splitting.
 @xref{Constant Size} for more information.
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, @code{FPAT} variable in
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry @code{FPAT} variable in
 @cindex @code{FPAT} variable
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, @code{FPAT} variable
-@cindex field separators, @code{FPAT} variable and
-@cindex separators, field, @code{FPAT} variable and
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry @code{FPAT} 
variable
+@cindex field separator @subentry @code{FPAT} variable and
+@cindex separators @subentry field @subentry @code{FPAT} variable and
 @item FPAT #
 A regular expression (as a string) that tells @command{gawk}
 to create the fields based on text that matches the regular expression.
@@ -15474,8 +15514,8 @@ overrides the use of @code{FS} and @code{FIELDWIDTHS} 
for field splitting.
 @xref{Splitting By Content} for more information.
 
 @cindex @code{FS} variable
-@cindex separators, field
-@cindex field separators
+@cindex separators @subentry field
+@cindex field separator
 @item FS
 The input field separator (@pxref{Field Separators}).
 The value is a single-character string or a multicharacter regular
@@ -15500,19 +15540,19 @@ You can set the value of @code{FS} on the command 
line using the
 awk -F, '@var{program}' @var{input-files}
 @end example
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, field separators and
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry field separators and
 If @command{gawk} is using @code{FIELDWIDTHS} or @code{FPAT}
 for field splitting,
 assigning a value to @code{FS} causes @command{gawk} to return to
 the normal, @code{FS}-based field splitting. An easy way to do this
 is to simply say @samp{FS = FS}, perhaps with an explanatory comment.
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, @code{IGNORECASE} variable in
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry @code{IGNORECASE} variable in
 @cindex @code{IGNORECASE} variable
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, @code{IGNORECASE} 
variable
-@cindex case sensitivity, string comparisons and
-@cindex case sensitivity, regexps and
-@cindex regular expressions, case sensitivity
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry 
@code{IGNORECASE} variable
+@cindex case sensitivity @subentry string comparisons and
+@cindex case sensitivity @subentry regexps and
+@cindex regular expressions @subentry case sensitivity
 @item IGNORECASE #
 If @code{IGNORECASE} is nonzero or non-null, then all string comparisons
 and all regular expression matching are case-independent.
@@ -15527,9 +15567,9 @@ and it does not affect field splitting when using a 
single-character
 field separator.
 @xref{Case-sensitivity}.
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, @code{LINT} variable in
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry @code{LINT} variable in
 @cindex @code{LINT} variable
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, @code{LINT} variable
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry @code{LINT} 
variable
 @cindex lint checking
 @item LINT #
 When this variable is true (nonzero or non-null), @command{gawk}
@@ -15551,8 +15591,8 @@ of lint warnings during program execution is 
independent of the flavor
 of @command{awk} being executed.
 
 @cindex @code{OFMT} variable
-@cindex numbers, converting, to strings
-@cindex strings, converting, numbers to
+@cindex numbers @subentry converting @subentry to strings
+@cindex strings @subentry converting @subentry numbers to
 @item OFMT
 A string that controls conversion of numbers to
 strings (@pxref{Conversion}) for
@@ -15563,10 +15603,10 @@ Its default value is @code{"%.6g"}.  Earlier versions 
of @command{awk}
 used @code{OFMT} to specify the format for converting numbers to
 strings in general expressions; this is now done by @code{CONVFMT}.
 
-@cindex @code{print} statement, @code{OFMT} variable and
+@cindex @code{print} statement @subentry @code{OFMT} variable and
 @cindex @code{OFS} variable
-@cindex separators, field
-@cindex field separators
+@cindex separators @subentry field
+@cindex field separator
 @item OFS
 The output field separator (@pxref{Output Separators}).  It is
 output between the fields printed by a @code{print} statement.  Its
@@ -15590,7 +15630,7 @@ numbers, by default @code{"N"} (@code{roundTiesToEven} 
in
 the IEEE 754 standard; @pxref{Setting the rounding mode}).
 
 @cindex @code{RS} variable
-@cindex separators, for records
+@cindex separators @subentry for records
 @cindex record separators
 @item @code{RS}
 The input record separator.  Its default value is a string
@@ -15610,7 +15650,7 @@ or if @command{gawk} is in compatibility mode
 just the first character of @code{RS}'s value is used.
 
 @cindex @code{SUBSEP} variable
-@cindex separators, subscript
+@cindex separators @subentry subscript
 @cindex subscript separators
 @item @code{SUBSEP}
 The subscript separator.  It has the default value of
@@ -15619,10 +15659,10 @@ multidimensional array.  Thus, the expression 
@samp{@w{foo["A", "B"]}}
 really accesses @code{foo["A\034B"]}
 (@pxref{Multidimensional}).
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, @code{TEXTDOMAIN} variable in
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry @code{TEXTDOMAIN} variable in
 @cindex @code{TEXTDOMAIN} variable
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, @code{TEXTDOMAIN} 
variable
-@cindex internationalization, localization
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry 
@code{TEXTDOMAIN} variable
+@cindex internationalization @subentry localization
 @item TEXTDOMAIN #
 Used for internationalization of programs at the
 @command{awk} level.  It sets the default text domain for specially
@@ -15635,8 +15675,8 @@ The default value of @code{TEXTDOMAIN} is 
@code{"messages"}.
 @node Auto-set
 @subsection Built-in Variables That Convey Information
 
-@cindex predefined variables, conveying information
-@cindex variables, predefined, conveying information
+@cindex predefined variables @subentry conveying information
+@cindex variables @subentry predefined @subentry conveying information
 The following is an alphabetical list of variables that @command{awk}
 sets automatically on certain occasions in order to provide
 information to your program.
@@ -15649,8 +15689,8 @@ mode (@pxref{Options}), they are not special:
 @c @asis for docbook
 @table @asis
 @cindex @code{ARGC}/@code{ARGV} variables
-@cindex arguments, command-line
-@cindex command line, arguments
+@cindex arguments @subentry command-line
+@cindex command line @subentry arguments
 @item @code{ARGC}, @code{ARGV}
 The command-line arguments available to @command{awk} programs are stored in
 an array called @code{ARGV}.  @code{ARGC} is the number of command-line
@@ -15678,12 +15718,12 @@ contains @samp{inventory-shipped}, and @code{ARGV[2]} 
contains
 index of the last element in @code{ARGV}, because the elements are numbered
 from zero.
 
-@cindex programming conventions, @code{ARGC}/@code{ARGV} variables
+@cindex programming conventions @subentry @code{ARGC}/@code{ARGV} variables
 The names @code{ARGC} and @code{ARGV}, as well as the convention of indexing
 the array from 0 to @code{ARGC} @minus{} 1, are derived from the C language's
 method of accessing command-line arguments.
 
-@cindex dark corner, value of @code{ARGV[0]}
+@cindex dark corner @subentry value of @code{ARGV[0]}
 The value of @code{ARGV[0]} can vary from system to system.
 Also, you should note that the program text is @emph{not} included in
 @code{ARGV}, nor are any of @command{awk}'s command-line options.
@@ -15692,7 +15732,7 @@ about how @command{awk} uses these variables.
 @value{DARKCORNER}
 
 @cindex @code{ARGIND} variable
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, @code{ARGIND} variable
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry 
@code{ARGIND} variable
 @item @code{ARGIND #}
 The index in @code{ARGV} of the current file being processed.
 Every time @command{gawk} opens a new @value{DF} for processing, it sets
@@ -15700,18 +15740,18 @@ Every time @command{gawk} opens a new @value{DF} for 
processing, it sets
 When @command{gawk} is processing the input files,
 @samp{FILENAME == ARGV[ARGIND]} is always true.
 
-@cindex files, processing@comma{} @code{ARGIND} variable and
+@cindex files @subentry processing, @code{ARGIND} variable and
 This variable is useful in file processing; it allows you to tell how far
 along you are in the list of @value{DF}s as well as to distinguish between
 successive instances of the same @value{FN} on the command line.
 
-@cindex file names, distinguishing
+@cindex file names @subentry distinguishing
 While you can change the value of @code{ARGIND} within your @command{awk}
 program, @command{gawk} automatically sets it to a new value when it
 opens the next file.
 
 @cindex @code{ENVIRON} array
-@cindex environment variables, in @code{ENVIRON} array
+@cindex environment variables @subentry in @code{ENVIRON} array
 @item @code{ENVIRON}
 An associative array containing the values of the environment.  The array
 indices are the environment variable names; the elements are the values of
@@ -15747,10 +15787,10 @@ On such systems, the @code{ENVIRON} array is empty 
(except for
 @pxref{AWKLIBPATH Variable}).
 @end ifnotdocbook
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, @code{ERRNO} variable in
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry @code{ERRNO} variable in
 @cindex @code{ERRNO} variable
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, @code{ERRNO} variable
-@cindex error handling, @code{ERRNO} variable and
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry @code{ERRNO} 
variable
+@cindex error handling @subentry @code{ERRNO} variable and
 @item @code{ERRNO #}
 If a system error occurs during a redirection for @code{getline}, during
 a read for @code{getline}, or during a @code{close()} operation, then
@@ -15773,7 +15813,7 @@ of @code{errno}.  For non-system errors, 
@code{PROCINFO["errno"]} will
 be zero.
 
 @cindex @code{FILENAME} variable
-@cindex dark corner, @code{FILENAME} variable
+@cindex dark corner @subentry @code{FILENAME} variable
 @item @code{FILENAME}
 The name of the current input file.  When no @value{DF}s are listed
 on the command line, @command{awk} reads from the standard input and
@@ -15807,8 +15847,8 @@ to @code{NF} can be used to create fields in or remove 
fields from the
 current record. @xref{Changing Fields}.
 
 @cindex @code{FUNCTAB} array
-@cindex @command{gawk}, @code{FUNCTAB} array in
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, @code{FUNCTAB} 
variable
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry @code{FUNCTAB} array in
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry 
@code{FUNCTAB} variable
 @item @code{FUNCTAB #}
 An array whose indices and corresponding values are the names of all
 the built-in, user-defined, and extension functions in the program.
@@ -15826,9 +15866,9 @@ the beginning of the program's execution
 (@pxref{Records}).
 @command{awk} increments @code{NR} each time it reads a new record.
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, @code{PROCINFO} array in
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry @code{PROCINFO} array in
 @cindex @code{PROCINFO} array
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, @code{PROCINFO} array
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry 
@code{PROCINFO} array
 @item @code{PROCINFO #}
 The elements of this array provide access to information about the
 running @command{awk} program.
@@ -15837,7 +15877,7 @@ are guaranteed to be available:
 
 @table @code
 @item PROCINFO["argv"]
-@cindex command line, arguments
+@cindex command line @subentry arguments
 The @code{PROCINFO["argv"]} array contains all of the command-line arguments
 (after glob expansion and redirection processing on platforms where that must
 be done manually by the program) with subscripts ranging from 0 through
@@ -15917,6 +15957,7 @@ while the program runs.
 
 @item PROCINFO["platform"]
 @cindex platform running on
+@cindex @code{PROCINFO} array @subentry platform running on
 This element gives a string indicating the platform for which
 @command{gawk} was compiled. The value will be one of the following:
 
@@ -15960,8 +16001,8 @@ Assigning a new value to this element changes the 
default.
 The value of the @code{getuid()} system call.
 
 @item PROCINFO["version"]
-@cindex version of @command{gawk}
-@cindex @command{gawk} version
+@cindex version of @subentry @command{gawk}
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry version of
 The version of @command{gawk}.
 @end table
 
@@ -15972,10 +16013,10 @@ if your version of @command{gawk} supports 
arbitrary-precision arithmetic
 
 @table @code
 @item PROCINFO["gmp_version"]
-@cindex version of GNU MP library
+@cindex version of @subentry GNU MP library
 The version of the GNU MP library.
 
-@cindex version of GNU MPFR library
+@cindex version of @subentry GNU MPFR library
 @item PROCINFO["mpfr_version"]
 The version of the GNU MPFR library.
 
@@ -15995,8 +16036,8 @@ of @command{gawk} supports dynamic loading of extension 
functions
 
 @table @code
 @item PROCINFO["api_major"]
-@cindex version of @command{gawk} extension API
-@cindex extension API, version number
+@cindex version of @subentry @command{gawk} extension API
+@cindex extension API @subentry version number
 The major version of the extension API.
 
 @item PROCINFO["api_minor"]
@@ -16068,16 +16109,16 @@ The start index in characters of the substring that 
is matched by the
 is the position of the string where the matched substring starts, or zero
 if no match was found.
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, @code{RT} variable in
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry @code{RT} variable in
 @cindex @code{RT} variable
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, @code{RS}/@code{RT} 
variables
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry 
@code{RS}/@code{RT} variables
 @item @code{RT #}
 The input text that matched the text denoted by @code{RS},
 the record separator.  It is set every time a record is read.
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, @code{SYMTAB} array in
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry @code{SYMTAB} array in
 @cindex @code{SYMTAB} array
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, @code{SYMTAB} variable
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry 
@code{SYMTAB} variable
 @item @code{SYMTAB #}
 An array whose indices are the names of all defined global variables and
 arrays in the program.  @code{SYMTAB} makes @command{gawk}'s symbol table
@@ -16153,15 +16194,15 @@ is available as an element within the @code{SYMTAB} 
array.
 @end quotation
 @end table
 
-@cindex sidebar, Changing @code{NR} and @code{FNR}
+@cindex sidebar @subentry Changing @code{NR} and @code{FNR}
 @ifdocbook
 @docbook
 <sidebar><title>Changing @code{NR} and @code{FNR}</title>
 @end docbook
 
-@cindex @code{NR} variable, changing
-@cindex @code{FNR} variable, changing
-@cindex dark corner, @code{FNR}/@code{NR} variables
+@cindex @code{NR} variable @subentry changing
+@cindex @code{FNR} variable @subentry changing
+@cindex dark corner @subentry @code{FNR}/@code{NR} variables
 @command{awk} increments @code{NR} and @code{FNR}
 each time it reads a record, instead of setting them to the absolute
 value of the number of records read.  This means that a program can
@@ -16199,9 +16240,9 @@ changed.
 @center @b{Changing @code{NR} and @code{FNR}}
 
 
-@cindex @code{NR} variable, changing
-@cindex @code{FNR} variable, changing
-@cindex dark corner, @code{FNR}/@code{NR} variables
+@cindex @code{NR} variable @subentry changing
+@cindex @code{FNR} variable @subentry changing
+@cindex dark corner @subentry @code{FNR}/@code{NR} variables
 @command{awk} increments @code{NR} and @code{FNR}
 each time it reads a record, instead of setting them to the absolute
 value of the number of records read.  This means that a program can
@@ -16233,9 +16274,9 @@ changed.
 
 @node ARGC and ARGV
 @subsection Using @code{ARGC} and @code{ARGV}
-@cindex @code{ARGC}/@code{ARGV} variables, how to use
-@cindex arguments, command-line
-@cindex command line, arguments
+@cindex @code{ARGC}/@code{ARGV} variables @subentry how to use
+@cindex arguments @subentry command-line
+@cindex command line @subentry arguments
 
 @ref{Auto-set}
 presented the following program describing the information contained in 
@code{ARGC}
@@ -16348,7 +16389,7 @@ BEGIN @{
 @}
 @end example
 
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, 
@code{ARGC}/@code{ARGV} variables
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry 
@code{ARGC}/@code{ARGV} variables
 Ending the @command{awk} options with @option{--} isn't
 necessary in @command{gawk}. Unless @option{--posix} has
 been specified, @command{gawk} silently puts any unrecognized options
@@ -16564,10 +16605,10 @@ Only the values are stored; the indices are implicit 
from the order of
 the values. Here, eight is the value at index zero, because eight appears in 
the
 position with zero elements before it.
 
-@cindex arrays, indexing
+@cindex arrays @subentry indexing
 @cindex indexing arrays
 @cindex associative arrays
-@cindex arrays, associative
+@cindex arrays @subentry associative
 Arrays in @command{awk} are different---they are @dfn{associative}.  This means
 that each array is a collection of pairs---an index and its corresponding
 array element value:
@@ -16690,7 +16731,7 @@ whose value is @w{@code{"number ten"}}.  The result is:
 
 @noindent
 @cindex sparse arrays
-@cindex arrays, sparse
+@cindex arrays @subentry sparse
 Now the array is @dfn{sparse}, which just means some indices are missing.
 It has elements 0--3 and 10, but doesn't have elements 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, or 9.
 
@@ -16758,10 +16799,10 @@ array subscripts; this is discussed in more detail in
 Here, the number @code{1} isn't double-quoted, because @command{awk}
 automatically converts it to a string.
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, @code{IGNORECASE} variable in
-@cindex case sensitivity, array indices and
-@cindex arrays, @code{IGNORECASE} variable and
-@cindex @code{IGNORECASE} variable, array indices and
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry @code{IGNORECASE} variable in
+@cindex case sensitivity @subentry array indices and
+@cindex arrays @subentry @code{IGNORECASE} variable and
+@cindex @code{IGNORECASE} variable @subentry array indices and
 The value of @code{IGNORECASE} has no effect upon array subscripting.
 The identical string value used to store an array element must be used
 to retrieve it.
@@ -16775,9 +16816,9 @@ is independent of the number of elements in the array.
 
 @node Reference to Elements
 @subsection Referring to an Array Element
-@cindex arrays, referencing elements
+@cindex arrays @subentry referencing elements
 @cindex array members
-@cindex elements of arrays
+@cindex elements in arrays
 
 The principal way to use an array is to refer to one of its elements.
 An @dfn{array reference} is an expression as follows:
@@ -16797,7 +16838,7 @@ The value of the array reference is the current value 
of that array
 element.  For example, @code{foo[4.3]} is an expression referencing the element
 of array @code{foo} at index @samp{4.3}.
 
-@cindex arrays, unassigned elements
+@cindex arrays @subentry unassigned elements
 @cindex unassigned array elements
 @cindex empty array elements
 A reference to an array element that has no recorded value yields a value of
@@ -16806,7 +16847,7 @@ that have not been assigned any value as well as 
elements that have been
 deleted (@pxref{Delete}).
 
 @cindex non-existent array elements
-@cindex arrays, elements that don't exist
+@cindex arrays @subentry elements @subentry that don't exist
 @quotation NOTE
 A reference to an element that does not exist @emph{automatically} creates
 that array element, with the null string as its value.  (In some cases,
@@ -16827,7 +16868,7 @@ an array element equal to the empty string.
 @end quotation
 
 @c @cindex arrays, @code{in} operator and
-@cindex @code{in} operator, testing if array element exists
+@cindex @code{in} operator @subentry testing if array element exists
 To determine whether an element exists in an array at a certain index, use
 the following expression:
 
@@ -16835,7 +16876,7 @@ the following expression:
 @var{indx} in @var{array}
 @end example
 
-@cindex side effects, array indexing
+@cindex side effects @subentry array indexing
 @noindent
 This expression tests whether the particular index @var{indx} exists,
 without the side effect of creating that element if it is not present.
@@ -16868,8 +16909,8 @@ if (frequencies[2] != "")
 
 @node Assigning Elements
 @subsection Assigning Array Elements
-@cindex arrays, elements, assigning values
-@cindex elements in arrays, assigning values
+@cindex arrays @subentry elements @subentry assigning values
+@cindex elements in arrays @subentry assigning values
 
 Array elements can be assigned values just like
 @command{awk} variables:
@@ -16886,7 +16927,7 @@ assign to that element of the array.
 
 @node Array Example
 @subsection Basic Array Example
-@cindex arrays, an example of using
+@cindex arrays @subentry example of using
 
 The following program takes a list of lines, each beginning with a line
 number, and prints them out in order of line number.  The line numbers
@@ -16961,10 +17002,10 @@ END @{
 
 @node Scanning an Array
 @subsection Scanning All Elements of an Array
-@cindex elements in arrays, scanning
+@cindex elements in arrays @subentry scanning
 @cindex scanning arrays
-@cindex arrays, scanning
-@cindex loops, @code{for}, array scanning
+@cindex arrays @subentry scanning
+@cindex loops @subentry @code{for} @subentry array scanning
 
 In programs that use arrays, it is often necessary to use a loop that
 executes once for each element of an array.  In other languages, where
@@ -16983,12 +17024,12 @@ for (@var{var} in @var{array})
 @end example
 
 @noindent
-@cindex @code{in} operator, use in loops
+@cindex @code{in} operator @subentry use in loops
 This loop executes @var{body} once for each index in @var{array} that the
 program has previously used, with the variable @var{var} set to that index.
 
-@cindex arrays, @code{for} statement and
-@cindex @code{for} statement, looping over arrays
+@cindex arrays @subentry @code{for} statement and
+@cindex @code{for} statement @subentry looping over arrays
 The following program uses this form of the @code{for} statement.  The
 first rule scans the input records and notes which words appear (at
 least once) in the input, by storing a one into the array @code{used} with
@@ -17026,9 +17067,9 @@ END @{
 @xref{Word Sorting}
 for a more detailed example of this type.
 
-@cindex arrays, elements, order of access by @code{in} operator
-@cindex elements in arrays, order of access by @code{in} operator
-@cindex @code{in} operator, order of array access
+@cindex arrays @subentry elements @subentry order of access by @code{in} 
operator
+@cindex elements in arrays @subentry order of access by @code{in} operator
+@cindex @code{in} operator @subentry order of array access
 The order in which elements of the array are accessed by this statement
 is determined by the internal arrangement of the array elements within
 @command{awk} and in standard @command{awk} cannot be controlled
@@ -17106,7 +17147,7 @@ to use for comparison of array elements. This advanced 
feature
 is described later in @ref{Array Sorting}.
 @end itemize
 
-@cindex @code{PROCINFO}, values of @code{sorted_in}
+@cindex @code{PROCINFO} array @subentry values of @code{sorted_in}
 The following special values for @code{PROCINFO["sorted_in"]} are available:
 
 @table @code
@@ -17241,11 +17282,11 @@ sorting arrays; see @ref{Array Sorting Functions}.
 @node Numeric Array Subscripts
 @section Using Numbers to Subscript Arrays
 
-@cindex numbers, as array subscripts
-@cindex array subscripts, numbers as
-@cindex arrays, numeric subscripts
-@cindex subscripts in arrays, numbers as
-@cindex @code{CONVFMT} variable, array subscripts and
+@cindex numbers @subentry as array subscripts
+@cindex array subscripts @subentry numbers as
+@cindex arrays @subentry numeric subscripts
+@cindex subscripts in arrays @subentry numbers as
+@cindex @code{CONVFMT} variable @subentry array subscripts and
 An important aspect to remember about arrays is that @emph{array subscripts
 are always strings}.  When a numeric value is used as a subscript,
 it is converted to a string value before being used for subscripting
@@ -17275,7 +17316,7 @@ string value from @code{xyz}---this time 
@code{"12.15"}---because the value of
 @code{CONVFMT} only allows two significant digits.  This test fails,
 because @code{"12.15"} is different from @code{"12.153"}.
 
-@cindex converting integer array subscripts
+@cindex converting @subentry integer array subscripts to strings
 @cindex integer array indices
 According to the rules for conversions
 (@pxref{Conversion}), integer
@@ -17309,10 +17350,10 @@ effect on your programs.
 @node Uninitialized Subscripts
 @section Using Uninitialized Variables as Subscripts
 
-@cindex variables, uninitialized@comma{} as array subscripts
+@cindex variables @subentry uninitialized, as array subscripts
 @cindex uninitialized variables, as array subscripts
-@cindex subscripts in arrays, uninitialized variables as
-@cindex arrays, subscripts, uninitialized variables as
+@cindex subscripts in arrays @subentry uninitialized variables as
+@cindex arrays @subentry subscripts, uninitialized variables as
 Suppose it's necessary to write a program
 to print the input data in reverse order.
 A reasonable attempt to do so (with some test
@@ -17356,10 +17397,10 @@ Here, the @samp{++} forces @code{lines} to be 
numeric, thus making
 the ``old value'' numeric zero. This is then converted to @code{"0"}
 as the array subscript.
 
-@cindex array subscripts, null strings as
-@cindex null strings, as array subscripts
-@cindex dark corner, array subscripts
-@cindex lint checking, array subscripts
+@cindex array subscripts @subentry null string as
+@cindex null strings @subentry as array subscripts
+@cindex dark corner @subentry array subscripts
+@cindex lint checking @subentry array subscripts
 Even though it is somewhat unusual, the null string
 (@code{""}) is a valid array subscript.
 @value{DARKCORNER}
@@ -17370,9 +17411,9 @@ on the command line (@pxref{Options}).
 @node Delete
 @section The @code{delete} Statement
 @cindex @code{delete} statement
-@cindex deleting elements in arrays
-@cindex arrays, elements, deleting
-@cindex elements in arrays, deleting
+@cindex deleting @subentry elements in arrays
+@cindex arrays @subentry elements @subentry deleting
+@cindex elements in arrays @subentry deleting
 
 To remove an individual element of an array, use the @code{delete}
 statement:
@@ -17403,7 +17444,7 @@ if (4 in foo)
     print "This will never be printed"
 @end example
 
-@cindex null strings, deleting array elements and
+@cindex null strings @subentry deleting array elements and
 It is important to note that deleting an element is @emph{not} the
 same as assigning it a null value (the empty string, @code{""}).
 For example:
@@ -17416,19 +17457,19 @@ if (4 in foo)
 @end group
 @end example
 
-@cindex lint checking, array elements
+@cindex lint checking @subentry array subscripts
 It is not an error to delete an element that does not exist.
 However, if @option{--lint} is provided on the command line
 (@pxref{Options}),
 @command{gawk} issues a warning message when an element that
 is not in the array is deleted.
 
-@cindex common extensions, @code{delete} to delete entire arrays
-@cindex extensions, common@comma{} @code{delete} to delete entire arrays
-@cindex arrays, deleting entire contents
-@cindex deleting entire arrays
+@cindex common extensions @subentry @code{delete} to delete entire arrays
+@cindex extensions @subentry common @subentry @code{delete} to delete entire 
arrays
+@cindex arrays @subentry deleting entire contents
+@cindex deleting @subentry entire arrays
 @cindex @code{delete} @var{array}
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, array elements, 
deleting
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry array 
elements, deleting
 All the elements of an array may be deleted with a single statement
 by leaving off the subscript in the @code{delete} statement,
 as follows:
@@ -17454,7 +17495,7 @@ POSIX standard.  See 
@uref{http://austingroupbugs.net/view.php?id=544,
 the Austin Group website}.
 @end quotation
 
-@cindex portability, deleting array elements
+@cindex portability @subentry deleting array elements
 @cindex Brennan, Michael
 The following statement provides a portable but nonobvious way to clear
 out an array:@footnote{Thanks to Michael Brennan for pointing this out.}
@@ -17463,7 +17504,7 @@ out an array:@footnote{Thanks to Michael Brennan for 
pointing this out.}
 split("", array)
 @end example
 
-@cindex @code{split()} function, array elements@comma{} deleting
+@cindex @code{split()} function @subentry array elements, deleting
 The @code{split()} function
 (@pxref{String Functions})
 clears out the target array first. This call asks it to split
@@ -17489,8 +17530,8 @@ a = 3
 * Multiscanning::               Scanning multidimensional arrays.
 @end menu
 
-@cindex subscripts in arrays, multidimensional
-@cindex arrays, multidimensional
+@cindex subscripts in arrays @subentry multidimensional
+@cindex arrays @subentry multidimensional
 A @dfn{multidimensional array} is an array in which an element is identified
 by a sequence of indices instead of a single index.  For example, a
 two-dimensional array requires two indices.  The usual way (in many
@@ -17498,7 +17539,7 @@ languages, including @command{awk}) to refer to an 
element of a
 two-dimensional array named @code{grid} is with
 @code{grid[@var{x},@var{y}]}.
 
-@cindex @code{SUBSEP} variable, multidimensional arrays and
+@cindex @code{SUBSEP} variable @subentry multidimensional arrays and
 Multidimensional arrays are supported in @command{awk} through
 concatenation of indices into one string.
 @command{awk} converts the indices into strings
@@ -17530,7 +17571,7 @@ combined strings that are ambiguous.  Suppose that 
@code{SUBSEP} is
 "b@@c"]}} are indistinguishable because both are actually
 stored as @samp{foo["a@@b@@c"]}.
 
-@cindex @code{in} operator, index existence in multidimensional arrays
+@cindex @code{in} operator @subentry index existence in multidimensional arrays
 To test whether a particular index sequence exists in a
 multidimensional array, use the same operator (@code{in}) that is
 used for single-dimensional arrays.  Write the whole sequence of indices
@@ -17599,8 +17640,8 @@ There is no special @code{for} statement for scanning a
 multidimensional arrays or elements---there is only a
 multidimensional @emph{way of accessing} an array.
 
-@cindex subscripts in arrays, multidimensional, scanning
-@cindex arrays, multidimensional, scanning
+@cindex subscripts in arrays @subentry multidimensional @subentry scanning
+@cindex arrays @subentry multidimensional @subentry scanning
 @cindex scanning multidimensional arrays
 However, if your program has an array that is always accessed as
 multidimensional, you can get the effect of scanning it by combining
@@ -17643,7 +17684,7 @@ separate indices is recovered.
 
 @node Arrays of Arrays
 @section Arrays of Arrays
-@cindex arrays of arrays
+@cindex arrays @subentry arrays of arrays
 
 @command{gawk} goes beyond standard @command{awk}'s multidimensional
 array access and provides true arrays of
@@ -17865,7 +17906,7 @@ element is itself a subarray.
 @node Functions
 @chapter Functions
 
-@cindex functions, built-in
+@cindex functions @subentry built-in
 @cindex built-in functions
 This @value{CHAPTER} describes @command{awk}'s built-in functions,
 which fall into three categories: numeric, string, and I/O.
@@ -17919,17 +17960,17 @@ the function followed
 by arguments in parentheses.  For example, @samp{atan2(y + z, 1)}
 is a call to the function @code{atan2()} and has two arguments.
 
-@cindex programming conventions, functions, calling
-@cindex whitespace, functions@comma{} calling
+@cindex programming conventions @subentry functions @subentry calling
+@cindex whitespace @subentry functions, calling
 Whitespace is ignored between the built-in function name and the
 opening parenthesis, but nonetheless it is good practice to avoid using 
whitespace
 there.  User-defined functions do not permit whitespace in this way, and
 it is easier to avoid mistakes by following a simple
 convention that always works---no whitespace after a function name.
 
-@cindex troubleshooting, @command{gawk}, fatal errors@comma{} function 
arguments
-@cindex @command{gawk}, function arguments and
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, function arguments 
(@command{gawk})
+@cindex troubleshooting @subentry @command{gawk} @subentry fatal errors, 
function arguments
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry function arguments and
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry function 
arguments
 Each built-in function accepts a certain number of arguments.
 In some cases, arguments can be omitted. The defaults for omitted
 arguments vary from function to function and are described under the
@@ -17946,9 +17987,9 @@ i = 4
 j = sqrt(i++)
 @end example
 
-@cindex evaluation order, functions
-@cindex functions, built-in, evaluation order
-@cindex built-in functions, evaluation order
+@cindex evaluation order @subentry functions
+@cindex functions @subentry built-in @subentry evaluation order
+@cindex built-in functions @subentry evaluation order
 @noindent
 the variable @code{i} is incremented to the value five before @code{sqrt()}
 is called with a value of four for its actual parameter.
@@ -17970,7 +18011,7 @@ two arguments 11 and 10.
 
 @node Numeric Functions
 @subsection Numeric Functions
-@cindex numeric functions
+@cindex numeric @subentry functions
 
 The following list describes all of
 the built-in functions that work with numbers.
@@ -18039,7 +18080,7 @@ is negative.
 @cindex Beebe, Nelson H.F.@:
 @item @code{rand()}
 @cindexawkfunc{rand}
-@cindex random numbers, @code{rand()}/@code{srand()} functions
+@cindex random numbers @subentry @code{rand()}/@code{srand()} functions
 Return a random number.  The values of @code{rand()} are
 uniformly distributed between zero and one.
 The value could be zero but is never one.@footnote{The C version of
@@ -18085,7 +18126,7 @@ function roll(n) @{ return 1 + int(rand() * n) @}
 @end example
 
 @cindex seeding random number generator
-@cindex random numbers, seed of
+@cindex random numbers @subentry seed of
 @quotation CAUTION
 In most @command{awk} implementations, including @command{gawk},
 @code{rand()} starts generating numbers from the same
@@ -18188,7 +18229,7 @@ pound sign (@samp{#}).  They are not available in 
compatibility mode
 @itemx @code{asorti(}@var{source} [@code{,} @var{dest} [@code{,} @var{how} ] 
]@code{) #}
 @cindexgawkfunc{asorti}
 @cindex sort array
-@cindex arrays, elements, retrieving number of
+@cindex arrays @subentry elements @subentry retrieving number of
 @cindexgawkfunc{asort}
 @cindex sort array indices
 These two functions are similar in behavior, so they are described
@@ -18208,7 +18249,7 @@ sequential integers starting with one.  If the optional 
array @var{dest}
 is specified, then @var{source} is duplicated into @var{dest}.  @var{dest}
 is then sorted, leaving the indices of @var{source} unchanged.
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, @code{IGNORECASE} variable in
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry @code{IGNORECASE} variable in
 When comparing strings, @code{IGNORECASE} affects the sorting
 (@pxref{Array Sorting Functions}).  If the
 @var{source} array contains subarrays as values (@pxref{Arrays of
@@ -18339,7 +18380,7 @@ and the third argument must be assignable.
 
 @item @code{index(@var{in}, @var{find})}
 @cindexawkfunc{index}
-@cindex search in string
+@cindex search for substring
 @cindex find substring in string
 Search the string @var{in} for the first occurrence of the string
 @var{find}, and return the position in characters where that occurrence
@@ -18353,7 +18394,7 @@ $ @kbd{awk 'BEGIN @{ print index("peanut", "an") @}'}
 @noindent
 If @var{find} is not found, @code{index()} returns zero.
 
-@cindex dark corner, regexp as second argument to @code{index()}
+@cindex dark corner @subentry regexp as second argument to @code{index()}
 With BWK @command{awk} and @command{gawk},
 it is a fatal error to use a regexp constant for @var{find}.
 Other implementations allow it, simply treating the regexp
@@ -18361,7 +18402,7 @@ constant as an expression meaning @samp{$0 ~ /regexp/}. 
@value{DARKCORNER}
 
 @item @code{length(}[@var{string}]@code{)}
 @cindexawkfunc{length}
-@cindex string length
+@cindex string @subentry length
 @cindex length of string
 Return the number of characters in @var{string}.  If
 @var{string} is a number, the length of the digit string representing
@@ -18386,8 +18427,8 @@ three characters.
 If no argument is supplied, @code{length()} returns the length of @code{$0}.
 
 @c @cindex historical features
-@cindex portability, @code{length()} function
-@cindex POSIX @command{awk}, functions and, @code{length()}
+@cindex portability @subentry @code{length()} function
+@cindex POSIX @command{awk} @subentry functions and @subentry @code{length()}
 @quotation NOTE
 In older versions of @command{awk}, the @code{length()} function could
 be called
@@ -18397,7 +18438,7 @@ support historical practice.  For programs to be 
maximally portable,
 always supply the parentheses.
 @end quotation
 
-@cindex dark corner, @code{length()} function
+@cindex dark corner @subentry @code{length()} function
 If @code{length()} is called with a variable that has not been used,
 @command{gawk} forces the variable to be a scalar.  Other
 implementations of @command{awk} leave the variable without a type.
@@ -18418,11 +18459,11 @@ If @option{--lint} has
 been specified on the command line, @command{gawk} issues a
 warning about this.
 
-@cindex common extensions, @code{length()} applied to an array
-@cindex extensions, common@comma{} @code{length()} applied to an array
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, @code{length()} 
function
+@cindex common extensions @subentry @code{length()} applied to an array
+@cindex extensions @subentry common @subentry @code{length()} applied to an 
array
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry 
@code{length()} function
 @cindex number of array elements
-@cindex array, number of elements
+@cindex arrays @subentry number of elements
 With @command{gawk} and several other @command{awk} implementations, when 
given an
 array argument, the @code{length()} function returns the number of elements
 in the array. @value{COMMONEXT}
@@ -18437,7 +18478,7 @@ If @option{--posix} is supplied, using an array 
argument is a fatal error
 
 @item @code{match(@var{string}, @var{regexp}} [@code{, @var{array}}]@code{)}
 @cindexawkfunc{match}
-@cindex string, regular expression match
+@cindex string @subentry regular expression match of
 @cindex match regexp in string
 Search @var{string} for the
 longest, leftmost substring matched by the regular expression
@@ -18458,9 +18499,11 @@ functions that work with regular expressions, such as
 for @code{match()}, the order is the same as for the @samp{~} operator:
 @samp{@var{string} ~ @var{regexp}}.
 
-@cindex @code{RSTART} variable, @code{match()} function and
-@cindex @code{RLENGTH} variable, @code{match()} function and
-@cindex @code{match()} function, @code{RSTART}/@code{RLENGTH} variables
+@cindex @code{RSTART} variable @subentry @code{match()} function and
+@cindex @code{RLENGTH} variable @subentry @code{match()} function and
+@cindex @code{match()} function @subentry @code{RSTART}/@code{RLENGTH} 
variables
+@cindex @code{match()} function @subentry side effects
+@cindex side effects @subentry @code{match()} function
 The @code{match()} function sets the predefined variable @code{RSTART} to
 the index.  It also sets the predefined variable @code{RLENGTH} to the
 length in characters of the matched substring.  If no match is found,
@@ -18508,7 +18551,7 @@ Match of ru+n found at 12 in My program runs
 Match of Melvin found at 1 in Melvin was here.
 @end example
 
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, @code{match()} 
function
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry 
@code{match()} function
 If @var{array} is present, it is cleared, and then the zeroth element
 of @var{array} is set to the entire portion of @var{string}
 matched by @var{regexp}.  If @var{regexp} contains parentheses,
@@ -18545,7 +18588,7 @@ subexpression, because they may not all have matched 
text; thus, they
 should be tested for with the @code{in} operator
 (@pxref{Reference to Elements}).
 
-@cindex troubleshooting, @code{match()} function
+@cindex troubleshooting @subentry @code{match()} function
 The @var{array} argument to @code{match()} is a
 @command{gawk} extension.  In compatibility mode
 (@pxref{Options}),
@@ -18608,7 +18651,7 @@ split("cul-de-sac", a, "-", seps)
 @end example
 
 @noindent
-@cindex strings splitting, example
+@cindex strings @subentry splitting, example
 splits the string @code{"cul-de-sac"} into three fields using @samp{-} as the
 separator.  It sets the contents of the array @code{a} as follows:
 
@@ -18628,7 +18671,7 @@ seps[2] = "-"
 @noindent
 The value returned by this call to @code{split()} is three.
 
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, @code{split()} 
function
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry 
@code{split()} function
 As with input field-splitting, when the value of @var{fieldsep} is
 @w{@code{" "}}, leading and trailing whitespace is ignored in values assigned 
to
 the elements of
@@ -18644,7 +18687,7 @@ Note, however, that @code{RS} has no effect on the way 
@code{split()}
 works. Even though @samp{RS = ""} causes the newline character to also be an 
input
 field separator, this does not affect how @code{split()} splits strings.
 
-@cindex dark corner, @code{split()} function
+@cindex dark corner @subentry @code{split()} function
 Modern implementations of @command{awk}, including @command{gawk}, allow
 the third argument to be a regexp constant (@w{@code{/}@dots{}@code{/}})
 as well as a string.  @value{DARKCORNER}
@@ -18664,11 +18707,12 @@ If @var{string} does not match @var{fieldsep} at all 
(but is not null),
 @var{array} has one element only. The value of that element is the original
 @var{string}.
 
+@cindex POSIX mode
 In POSIX mode (@pxref{Options}), the fourth argument is not allowed.
 
 @item @code{sprintf(@var{format}, @var{expression1}, @dots{})}
 @cindexawkfunc{sprintf}
-@cindex formatting strings
+@cindex formatting @subentry strings
 Return (without printing) the string that @code{printf} would
 have printed out with the same arguments
 (@pxref{Printf}).
@@ -18682,7 +18726,7 @@ pival = sprintf("pi = %.2f (approx.)", 22/7)
 assigns the string @w{@samp{pi = 3.14 (approx.)}} to the variable @code{pival}.
 
 @cindexgawkfunc{strtonum}
-@cindex convert string to number
+@cindex converting @subentry string to numbers
 @item @code{strtonum(@var{str}) #}
 Examine @var{str} and return its numeric value.  If @var{str}
 begins with a leading @samp{0}, @code{strtonum()} assumes that @var{str}
@@ -18781,8 +18825,10 @@ an @samp{&}:
 @{ sub(/\|/, "\\&"); print @}
 @end example
 
-@cindex @code{sub()} function, arguments of
-@cindex @code{gsub()} function, arguments of
+@cindex @code{sub()} function @subentry arguments of
+@cindex @code{gsub()} function @subentry arguments of
+@cindex side effects @subentry @code{sub()} function
+@cindex side effects @subentry @code{gsub()} function
 As mentioned, the third argument to @code{sub()} must
 be a variable, field, or array element.
 Some versions of @command{awk} allow the third argument to
@@ -18797,7 +18843,7 @@ sub(/USA/, "United States", "the USA and Canada")
 @end example
 
 @noindent
-@cindex troubleshooting, @code{gsub()}/@code{sub()} functions
+@cindex troubleshooting @subentry @code{gsub()}/@code{sub()} functions
 For historical compatibility, @command{gawk} accepts such erroneous code.
 However, using any other nonchangeable
 object as the third parameter causes a fatal error and your program
@@ -18832,7 +18878,7 @@ in the string, @code{substr()} returns the null string.
 Similarly, if @var{length} is present but less than or equal to zero,
 the null string is returned.
 
-@cindex troubleshooting, @code{substr()} function
+@cindex troubleshooting @subentry @code{substr()} function
 The string returned by @code{substr()} @emph{cannot} be
 assigned.  Thus, it is a mistake to attempt to change a portion of
 a string, as shown in the following example:
@@ -18851,7 +18897,7 @@ of @code{sub()} or @code{gsub()}:
 gsub(/xyz/, "pdq", substr($0, 5, 20))  # WRONG
 @end example
 
-@cindex portability, @code{substr()} function
+@cindex portability @subentry @code{substr()} function
 (Some commercial versions of @command{awk} treat
 @code{substr()} as assignable, but doing so is not portable.)
 
@@ -18864,11 +18910,11 @@ string = "abcdef"
 string = substr(string, 1, 2) "CDE" substr(string, 6)
 @end example
 
-@cindex case sensitivity, converting case
-@cindex strings, converting letter case
+@cindex case sensitivity @subentry converting case
+@cindex strings @subentry converting letter case
 @item @code{tolower(@var{string})}
 @cindexawkfunc{tolower}
-@cindex convert string to lower case
+@cindex converting @subentry string to lower case
 Return a copy of @var{string}, with each uppercase character
 in the string replaced with its corresponding lowercase character.
 Nonalphabetic characters are left unchanged.  For example,
@@ -18876,23 +18922,23 @@ Nonalphabetic characters are left unchanged.  For 
example,
 
 @item @code{toupper(@var{string})}
 @cindexawkfunc{toupper}
-@cindex convert string to upper case
+@cindex converting @subentry string to upper case
 Return a copy of @var{string}, with each lowercase character
 in the string replaced with its corresponding uppercase character.
 Nonalphabetic characters are left unchanged.  For example,
 @code{toupper("MiXeD cAsE 123")} returns @code{"MIXED CASE 123"}.
 @end table
 
-@cindex sidebar, Matching the Null String
+@cindex sidebar @subentry Matching the Null String
 @ifdocbook
 @docbook
 <sidebar><title>Matching the Null String</title>
 @end docbook
 
-@cindex matching, null strings
-@cindex null strings, matching
-@cindex @code{*} (asterisk), @code{*} operator, null strings@comma{} matching
-@cindex asterisk (@code{*}), @code{*} operator, null strings@comma{} matching
+@cindex matching @subentry null strings
+@cindex null strings @subentry matching
+@cindex @code{*} (asterisk) @subentry @code{*} operator @subentry null 
strings, matching
+@cindex asterisk (@code{*}) @subentry @code{*} operator @subentry null 
strings, matching
 
 In @command{awk}, the @samp{*} operator can match the null string.
 This is particularly important for the @code{sub()}, @code{gsub()},
@@ -18916,10 +18962,10 @@ Although this makes a certain amount of sense, it can 
be surprising.
 @center @b{Matching the Null String}
 
 
-@cindex matching, null strings
-@cindex null strings, matching
-@cindex @code{*} (asterisk), @code{*} operator, null strings@comma{} matching
-@cindex asterisk (@code{*}), @code{*} operator, null strings@comma{} matching
+@cindex matching @subentry null strings
+@cindex null strings @subentry matching
+@cindex @code{*} (asterisk) @subentry @code{*} operator @subentry null 
strings, matching
+@cindex asterisk (@code{*}) @subentry @code{*} operator @subentry null 
strings, matching
 
 In @command{awk}, the @samp{*} operator can match the null string.
 This is particularly important for the @code{sub()}, @code{gsub()},
@@ -18939,14 +18985,14 @@ Although this makes a certain amount of sense, it can 
be surprising.
 @node Gory Details
 @subsubsection More about @samp{\} and @samp{&} with @code{sub()}, 
@code{gsub()}, and @code{gensub()}
 
-@cindex escape processing, @code{gsub()}/@code{gensub()}/@code{sub()} functions
-@cindex @code{sub()} function, escape processing
-@cindex @code{gsub()} function, escape processing
-@cindex @code{gensub()} function (@command{gawk}), escape processing
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), @code{gsub()}/@code{gensub()}/@code{sub()} 
functions and
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), @code{gsub()}/@code{gensub()}/@code{sub()} 
functions and
-@cindex @code{&} (ampersand), @code{gsub()}/@code{gensub()}/@code{sub()} 
functions and
-@cindex ampersand (@code{&}), @code{gsub()}/@code{gensub()}/@code{sub()} 
functions and
+@cindex escape processing @subentry @code{gsub()}/@code{gensub()}/@code{sub()} 
functions
+@cindex @code{sub()} function @subentry escape processing
+@cindex @code{gsub()} function @subentry escape processing
+@cindex @code{gensub()} function (@command{gawk}) @subentry escape processing
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry 
@code{gsub()}/@code{gensub()}/@code{sub()} functions and
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry 
@code{gsub()}/@code{gensub()}/@code{sub()} functions and
+@cindex @code{&} (ampersand) @subentry 
@code{gsub()}/@code{gensub()}/@code{sub()} functions and
+@cindex ampersand (@code{&}) @subentry 
@code{gsub()}/@code{gensub()}/@code{sub()} functions and
 
 @quotation CAUTION
 This subsubsection has been reported to cause headaches.
@@ -19112,7 +19158,7 @@ was expected.  In addition, the @command{gawk} 
maintainer's proposal was
 lost during the standardization process.  The final rules are
 somewhat simpler.  The results are similar except for one case.
 
-@cindex POSIX @command{awk}, functions and, @code{gsub()}/@code{sub()}
+@cindex POSIX @command{awk} @subentry functions and @subentry 
@code{gsub()}/@code{sub()}
 The POSIX rules state that @samp{\&} in the replacement string produces
 a literal @samp{&}, @samp{\\} produces a literal @samp{\}, and @samp{\} 
followed
 by anything else is not special; the @samp{\} is placed straight into the 
output.
@@ -19242,7 +19288,7 @@ to do substitutions.
 
 @node I/O Functions
 @subsection Input/Output Functions
-@cindex input/output functions
+@cindex input/output @subentry functions
 
 The following functions relate to input/output (I/O).
 Optional parameters are enclosed in square brackets ([ ]):
@@ -19250,7 +19296,7 @@ Optional parameters are enclosed in square brackets ([ 
]):
 @table @asis
 @item @code{close(}@var{filename} [@code{,} @var{how}]@code{)}
 @cindexawkfunc{close}
-@cindex files, closing
+@cindex files @subentry closing
 @cindex close file or coprocess
 Close the file @var{filename} for input or output. Alternatively, the
 argument may be a shell command that was used for creating a coprocess, or
@@ -19278,8 +19324,8 @@ Flush any buffered output associated with 
@var{filename}, which is either a
 file opened for writing or a shell command for redirecting output to
 a pipe or coprocess.
 
-@cindex buffers, flushing
-@cindex output, buffering
+@cindex buffers @subentry flushing
+@cindex output @subentry buffering
 Many utility programs @dfn{buffer} their output (i.e., they save information
 to write to a disk file or the screen in memory until there is enough
 for it to be worthwhile to send the data to the output device).
@@ -19291,7 +19337,7 @@ This is the purpose of the @code{fflush()} 
function---@command{gawk} also
 buffers its output, and the @code{fflush()} function forces
 @command{gawk} to flush its buffers.
 
-@cindex extensions, common@comma{} @code{fflush()} function
+@cindex extensions @subentry common @subentry @code{fflush()} function
 @cindex Brian Kernighan's @command{awk}
 Brian Kernighan added @code{fflush()} to his @command{awk} in April
 1992.  For two decades, it was a common extension.  In December
@@ -19318,7 +19364,7 @@ only the standard output.
 
 @c @cindex automatic warnings
 @c @cindex warnings, automatic
-@cindex troubleshooting, @code{fflush()} function
+@cindex troubleshooting @subentry @code{fflush()} function
 @code{fflush()} returns zero if the buffer is successfully flushed;
 otherwise, it returns a nonzero value. (@command{gawk} returns @minus{}1.)
 In the case where all buffers are flushed, the return value is zero
@@ -19333,13 +19379,13 @@ In such a case, @code{fflush()} returns @minus{}1, as 
well.
 @c end the table to let the sidebar take up the full width of the page.
 @end table
 
-@cindex sidebar, Interactive Versus Noninteractive Buffering
+@cindex sidebar @subentry Interactive Versus Noninteractive Buffering
 @ifdocbook
 @docbook
 <sidebar><title>Interactive Versus Noninteractive Buffering</title>
 @end docbook
 
-@cindex buffering, interactive vs.@: noninteractive
+@cindex buffering @subentry interactive vs.@: noninteractive
 
 As a side point, buffering issues can be even more confusing if
 your program is @dfn{interactive} (i.e., communicating
@@ -19390,7 +19436,7 @@ it is all buffered and sent down the pipe to 
@command{cat} in one shot.
 @center @b{Interactive Versus Noninteractive Buffering}
 
 
-@cindex buffering, interactive vs.@: noninteractive
+@cindex buffering @subentry interactive vs.@: noninteractive
 
 As a side point, buffering issues can be even more confusing if
 your program is @dfn{interactive} (i.e., communicating
@@ -19466,8 +19512,8 @@ close("/bin/sh")
 @end example
 
 @noindent
-@cindex troubleshooting, @code{system()} function
-@cindex @option{--sandbox} option, disabling @code{system()} function
+@cindex troubleshooting @subentry @code{system()} function
+@cindex @option{--sandbox} option @subentry disabling @code{system()} function
 However, if your @command{awk}
 program is interactive, @code{system()} is useful for running large
 self-contained programs, such as a shell or an editor.
@@ -19512,15 +19558,15 @@ The return values are summarized in 
@ref{table-system-return-values}.
 As of August, 2018, BWK @command{awk} now follows @command{gawk}'s behavior
 for the return value of @code{system()}.
 
-@cindex sidebar, Controlling Output Buffering with @code{system()}
+@cindex sidebar @subentry Controlling Output Buffering with @code{system()}
 @ifdocbook
 @docbook
 <sidebar><title>Controlling Output Buffering with @code{system()}</title>
 @end docbook
 
-@cindex buffers, flushing
-@cindex buffering, input/output
-@cindex output, buffering
+@cindex buffers @subentry flushing
+@cindex buffering @subentry input/output
+@cindex output @subentry buffering
 
 The @code{fflush()} function provides explicit control over output buffering 
for
 individual files and pipes.  However, its use is not portable to many older
@@ -19583,9 +19629,9 @@ you would see the latter (undesirable) output.
 @center @b{Controlling Output Buffering with @code{system()}}
 
 
-@cindex buffers, flushing
-@cindex buffering, input/output
-@cindex output, buffering
+@cindex buffers @subentry flushing
+@cindex buffering @subentry input/output
+@cindex output @subentry buffering
 
 The @code{fflush()} function provides explicit control over output buffering 
for
 individual files and pipes.  However, its use is not portable to many older
@@ -19646,9 +19692,9 @@ you would see the latter (undesirable) output.
 
 @cindex timestamps
 @cindex log files, timestamps in
-@cindex files, log@comma{} timestamps in
-@cindex @command{gawk}, timestamps
-@cindex POSIX @command{awk}, timestamps and
+@cindex files @subentry log, timestamps in
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry timestamps
+@cindex POSIX @command{awk} @subentry timestamps and
 @command{awk} programs are commonly used to process log files
 containing timestamp information, indicating when a
 particular log record was written.  Many programs log their timestamps
@@ -19679,8 +19725,8 @@ which is sufficient to represent times through
 including negative timestamps that represent times before the
 epoch.
 
-@cindex @command{date} utility, GNU
-@cindex time, retrieving
+@cindex @command{date} utility @subentry GNU
+@cindex time @subentry retrieving
 In order to make it easier to process such log files and to produce
 useful reports, @command{gawk} provides the following functions for
 working with timestamps.  They are @command{gawk} extensions; they are
@@ -19723,7 +19769,7 @@ whether daylight savings time is in effect for the 
specified time.
 If @var{datespec} does not contain enough elements or if the resulting time
 is out of range, @code{mktime()} returns @minus{}1.
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, @code{PROCINFO} array in
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry @code{PROCINFO} array in
 @cindex @code{PROCINFO} array
 @item @code{strftime(}[@var{format} [@code{,} @var{timestamp} [@code{,} 
@var{utc-flag}] ] ]@code{)}
 @cindexgawkfunc{strftime}
@@ -19761,9 +19807,9 @@ log file with the current time of day.  In particular, 
it is easy to
 determine how long ago a particular record was logged.  It also allows
 you to produce log records using the ``seconds since the epoch'' format.
 
-@cindex converting, dates to timestamps
-@cindex dates, converting to timestamps
-@cindex timestamps, converting dates to
+@cindex converting @subentry dates to timestamps
+@cindex dates @subentry converting to timestamps
+@cindex timestamps @subentry converting dates to
 The @code{mktime()} function allows you to convert a textual representation
 of a date and time into a timestamp.   This makes it easy to do before/after
 comparisons of dates and times, particularly when dealing with date and
@@ -19777,7 +19823,7 @@ in that it copies nonformat specification characters 
verbatim to the
 returned string, while substituting date and time values for format
 specifications in the @var{format} string.
 
-@cindex format specifiers, @code{strftime()} function (@command{gawk})
+@cindex format specifiers @subentry @code{strftime()} function (@command{gawk})
 @code{strftime()} is guaranteed by the 1999 ISO C
 standard@footnote{Unfortunately,
 not every system's @code{strftime()} necessarily
@@ -19877,7 +19923,7 @@ The weekday as a decimal number (1--7).  Monday is day 
one.
 The week number of the year (with the first Sunday as the first day of week 
one)
 as a decimal number (00--53).
 
-@c @cindex ISO 8601
+@cindex ISO @subentry ISO 8601 date and time standard
 @item %V
 The week number of the year (with the first Monday as the first
 day of week one) as a decimal number (01--53).
@@ -19978,8 +20024,8 @@ The date in VMS format (e.g., @samp{20-JUN-1991}).
 Additionally, the alternative representations are recognized but their
 normal representations are used.
 
-@cindex @code{date} utility, POSIX
-@cindex POSIX @command{awk}, @code{date} utility and
+@cindex @code{date} utility @subentry POSIX
+@cindex POSIX @command{awk} @subentry @code{date} utility and
 The following example is an @command{awk} implementation of the POSIX
 @command{date} utility.  Normally, the @command{date} utility prints the
 current date and time of day in a well-known format.  However, if you
@@ -20028,7 +20074,7 @@ gawk 'BEGIN  @{
 @node Bitwise Functions
 @subsection Bit-Manipulation Functions
 @cindex bit-manipulation functions
-@cindex bitwise, operations
+@cindex bitwise @subentry operations
 @cindex AND bitwise operation
 @cindex OR bitwise operation
 @cindex XOR bitwise operation
@@ -20155,7 +20201,7 @@ Operands  | 0 | 1 | 0 | 1 | 0 | 1
 @end docbook
 @end float
 
-@cindex bitwise complement
+@cindex bitwise @subentry complement
 @cindex complement, bitwise
 As you can see, the result of an AND operation is 1 only when @emph{both}
 bits are 1.
@@ -20166,7 +20212,7 @@ The next operation is the @dfn{complement}; the 
complement of 1 is 0 and
 the complement of 0 is 1. Thus, this operation ``flips'' all the bits
 of a given value.
 
-@cindex bitwise, shift
+@cindex bitwise @subentry shift
 @cindex left shift, bitwise
 @cindex right shift, bitwise
 @cindex shift, bitwise
@@ -20181,35 +20227,33 @@ bits, you end up with @samp{11001000}.  The following 
list describes
 @command{gawk}'s built-in functions that implement the bitwise operations.
 Optional parameters are enclosed in square brackets ([ ]):
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, bitwise operations in
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry bitwise operations in
 @table @asis
 @cindexgawkfunc{and}
-@cindex bitwise AND
+@cindex bitwise @subentry AND
 @item @code{and(}@var{v1}@code{,} @var{v2} [@code{,} @dots{}]@code{)}
 Return the bitwise AND of the arguments. There must be at least two.
 
 @cindexgawkfunc{compl}
-@cindex bitwise complement
+@cindex bitwise @subentry complement
 @item @code{compl(@var{val})}
 Return the bitwise complement of @var{val}.
 
 @cindexgawkfunc{lshift}
-@cindex left shift
 @item @code{lshift(@var{val}, @var{count})}
 Return the value of @var{val}, shifted left by @var{count} bits.
 
 @cindexgawkfunc{or}
-@cindex bitwise OR
+@cindex bitwise @subentry OR
 @item @code{or(}@var{v1}@code{,} @var{v2} [@code{,} @dots{}]@code{)}
 Return the bitwise OR of the arguments. There must be at least two.
 
 @cindexgawkfunc{rshift}
-@cindex right shift
 @item @code{rshift(@var{val}, @var{count})}
 Return the value of @var{val}, shifted right by @var{count} bits.
 
 @cindexgawkfunc{xor}
-@cindex bitwise XOR
+@cindex bitwise @subentry XOR
 @item @code{xor(}@var{v1}@code{,} @var{v2} [@code{,} @dots{}]@code{)}
 Return the bitwise XOR of the arguments. There must be at least two.
 @end table
@@ -20225,6 +20269,7 @@ Here is a user-defined function (@pxref{User-defined})
 that illustrates the use of these functions:
 
 @cindex @code{bits2str()} user-defined function
+@cindex user-defined @subentry function @subentry @code{bits2str()}
 @cindex @code{testbits.awk} program
 @example
 @group
@@ -20298,11 +20343,11 @@ $ @kbd{gawk -f testbits.awk}
 @print{} rshift(0x99, 2) = 0x26 = 00100110
 @end example
 
-@cindex converting, strings to numbers
-@cindex strings, converting
-@cindex numbers, converting
-@cindex converting, numbers to strings
-@cindex numbers, as string of bits
+@cindex converting @subentry string to numbers
+@cindex strings @subentry converting
+@cindex numbers @subentry converting
+@cindex converting @subentry numbers to strings
+@cindex numbers @subentry as string of bits
 The @code{bits2str()} function turns a binary number into a string.
 Initializing @code{mask} to one creates
 a binary value where the rightmost bit
@@ -20325,7 +20370,7 @@ decimal and octal values for the same numbers
 and then demonstrates the
 results of the @code{compl()}, @code{lshift()}, and @code{rshift()} functions.
 
-@cindex sidebar, Beware The Smoke and Mirrors!
+@cindex sidebar @subentry Beware The Smoke and Mirrors!
 @ifdocbook
 @docbook
 <sidebar><title>Beware The Smoke and Mirrors!</title>
@@ -20463,8 +20508,8 @@ that traverses every element of an array of arrays
 Return a true value if @var{x} is an array. Otherwise, return false.
 
 @cindexgawkfunc{typeof}
-@cindex variable type
-@cindex type, of variable
+@cindex variable type, @code{typeof()} function (@command{gawk})
+@cindex type @subentry of variable, @code{typeof()} function (@command{gawk})
 @item typeof(@var{x})
 Return one of the following strings, depending upon the type of @var{x}:
 
@@ -20548,11 +20593,11 @@ not change their arguments from untyped to unassigned.
 
 @node I18N Functions
 @subsection String-Translation Functions
-@cindex @command{gawk}, string-translation functions
-@cindex functions, string-translation
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry string-translation functions
+@cindex functions @subentry string-translation
 @cindex string-translation functions
 @cindex internationalization
-@cindex @command{awk} programs, internationalizing
+@cindex @command{awk} programs @subentry internationalizing
 
 @command{gawk} provides facilities for internationalizing @command{awk} 
programs.
 These include the functions described in the following list.
@@ -20598,8 +20643,8 @@ The default value for @var{category} is 
@code{"LC_MESSAGES"}.
 @node User-defined
 @section User-Defined Functions
 
-@cindex user-defined functions
-@cindex functions, user-defined
+@cindex user-defined @subentry functions
+@cindex functions @subentry user-defined
 Complicated @command{awk} programs can often be simplified by defining
 your own functions.  User-defined functions can be called just like
 built-in ones (@pxref{Function Calls}), but it is up to you to define
@@ -20623,7 +20668,7 @@ variable definitions is appallingly awful.}
 @author Brian Kernighan
 @end quotation
 
-@cindex functions, defining
+@cindex functions @subentry defining
 Definitions of functions can appear anywhere between the rules of an
 @command{awk} program.  Thus, the general form of an @command{awk} program is
 extended to include sequences of rules @emph{and} user-defined function
@@ -20643,9 +20688,9 @@ The definition of a function named @var{name} looks 
like this:
 @end group
 @end display
 
-@cindex names, functions
-@cindex functions, names of
-@cindex namespace issues, functions
+@cindex names @subentry functions
+@cindex functions @subentry names of
+@cindex naming issues @subentry functions
 @noindent
 Here, @var{name} is the name of the function to define.  A valid function
 name is like a valid variable name: a sequence of letters, digits, and
@@ -20700,13 +20745,13 @@ arguments on some occasions and local variables on 
others.  Another
 way to think of this is that omitted arguments default to the
 null string.
 
-@cindex programming conventions, functions, writing
+@cindex programming conventions @subentry functions @subentry writing
 Usually when you write a function, you know how many names you intend to
 use for arguments and how many you intend to use as local variables.  It is
 conventional to place some extra space between the arguments and
 the local variables, in order to document how your function is supposed to be 
used.
 
-@cindex variables, shadowing
+@cindex variables @subentry shadowing
 @cindex shadowing of variable values
 During execution of the function body, the arguments and local variable
 values hide, or @dfn{shadow}, any variables of the same names used in the
@@ -20721,7 +20766,7 @@ is executing.  Once the body finishes, you can once 
again access the
 variables that were shadowed while the function was running.
 
 @cindex recursive functions
-@cindex functions, recursive
+@cindex functions @subentry recursive
 The function body can contain expressions that call functions.  They
 can even call this function, either directly or by way of another
 function.  When this happens, we say the function is @dfn{recursive}.
@@ -20733,11 +20778,11 @@ which is described in detail in @ref{Return 
Statement}.
 Many of the subsequent examples in this @value{SECTION} use
 the @code{return} statement.
 
-@cindex common extensions, @code{func} keyword
-@cindex extensions, common@comma{} @code{func} keyword
-@c @cindex @command{awk} language, POSIX version
+@cindex common extensions @subentry @code{func} keyword
+@cindex extensions @subentry common @subentry @code{func} keyword
 @c @cindex POSIX @command{awk}
-@cindex POSIX @command{awk}, @code{function} keyword in
+@cindex @command{awk} @subentry language, POSIX version
+@cindex POSIX @command{awk} @subentry @code{function} keyword in
 In many @command{awk} implementations, including @command{gawk},
 the keyword @code{function} may be
 abbreviated @code{func}. @value{COMMONEXT}
@@ -20760,7 +20805,7 @@ syntactically valid, because functions may be used 
before they are defined
 in @command{awk} programs.@footnote{This program won't actually run,
 because @code{foo()} is undefined.})
 
-@cindex portability, functions@comma{} defining
+@cindex portability @subentry functions, defining
 To ensure that your @command{awk} programs are portable, always use the
 keyword @code{function} when defining a function.
 
@@ -20835,6 +20880,7 @@ already empty:
 
 @c 8/2014: Thanks to Mike Brennan for the improved formulation
 @cindex @code{rev()} user-defined function
+@cindex user-defined @subentry function @subentry @code{rev()}
 @example
 function rev(str)
 @{
@@ -20861,6 +20907,7 @@ The following example uses the built-in 
@code{strftime()} function
 to create an @command{awk} version of @code{ctime()}:
 
 @cindex @code{ctime()} user-defined function
+@cindex user-defined @subentry function @subentry @code{ctime()}
 @example
 @c file eg/lib/ctime.awk
 # ctime.awk
@@ -20886,7 +20933,7 @@ code could have changed @code{PROCINFO["strftime"]}.
 @node Function Calling
 @subsection Calling User-Defined Functions
 
-@cindex functions, user-defined, calling
+@cindex functions @subentry user-defined @subentry calling
 @dfn{Calling a function} means causing the function to run and do its job.
 A function call is an expression and its value is the value returned by
 the function.
@@ -20924,8 +20971,8 @@ an error.
 @node Variable Scope
 @subsubsection Controlling Variable Scope
 
-@cindex local variables, in a function
-@cindex variables, local to a function
+@cindex local variables @subentry in a function
+@cindex variables @subentry local to a function
 Unlike in many languages,
 there is no way to make a variable local to a @code{@{} @dots{} @code{@}} 
block in
 @command{awk}, but you can make a variable local to a function. It is
@@ -21110,8 +21157,8 @@ cannot alter this outer value, because it is shadowed 
during the
 execution of @code{myfunc()} and cannot be seen or changed from there.
 
 @cindex call by reference
-@cindex arrays, as parameters to functions
-@cindex functions, arrays as parameters to
+@cindex arrays @subentry as parameters to functions
+@cindex functions @subentry arrays as parameters to
 However, when arrays are the parameters to functions, they are @emph{not}
 copied.  Instead, the array itself is made available for direct manipulation
 by the function.  This is usually termed @dfn{call by reference}.
@@ -21146,7 +21193,7 @@ prints @samp{a[1] = 1, a[2] = two, a[3] = 3}, because
 @subsubsection Other Points About Calling Functions
 
 @cindex undefined functions
-@cindex functions, undefined
+@cindex functions @subentry undefined
 Some @command{awk} implementations allow you to call a function that
 has not been defined. They only report a problem at runtime, when the
 program actually tries to call the function. For example:
@@ -21167,12 +21214,12 @@ Because the @samp{if} statement will never be true, 
it is not really a
 problem that @code{foo()} has not been defined.  Usually, though, it is a
 problem if a program calls an undefined function.
 
-@cindex lint checking, undefined functions
+@cindex lint checking @subentry undefined functions
 If @option{--lint} is specified
 (@pxref{Options}),
 @command{gawk} reports calls to undefined functions.
 
-@cindex portability, @code{next} statement in user-defined functions
+@cindex portability @subentry @code{next} statement in user-defined functions
 Some @command{awk} implementations generate a runtime
 error if you use either the @code{next} statement
 or the @code{nextfile} statement
@@ -21218,7 +21265,7 @@ don't like the warning, fix your code!  It's incorrect, 
after all.)
 
 @node Return Statement
 @subsection The @code{return} Statement
-@cindex @code{return} statement@comma{} user-defined functions
+@cindex @code{return} statement, user-defined functions
 
 As seen in several earlier examples,
 the body of a user-defined function can contain a @code{return} statement.
@@ -21263,7 +21310,7 @@ function maxelt(vec,   i, ret)
 @}
 @end example
 
-@cindex programming conventions, function parameters
+@cindex programming conventions @subentry function parameters
 @noindent
 You call @code{maxelt()} with one argument, which is an array name.  The local
 variables @code{i} and @code{ret} are not intended to be arguments;
@@ -21349,10 +21396,10 @@ being aware of them.
 @section Indirect Function Calls
 
 @cindex indirect function calls
-@cindex function calls, indirect
+@cindex function calls @subentry indirect
 @cindex function pointers
 @cindex pointers to functions
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, indirect function 
calls
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry indirect 
function calls
 
 This section describes an advanced, @command{gawk}-specific extension.
 
@@ -21404,9 +21451,10 @@ This style of programming works, but can be awkward.  
With @dfn{indirect}
 function calls, you tell @command{gawk} to use the @emph{value} of a
 variable as the @emph{name} of the function to call.
 
-@cindex @code{@@}-notation for indirect function calls
-@cindex indirect function calls, @code{@@}-notation
-@cindex function calls, indirect, @code{@@}-notation for
+@cindex @code{@@} (at-sign) @subentry @code{@@}-notation for indirect function 
calls
+@cindex at-sign (@code{@@}) @subentry @code{@@}-notation for indirect function 
calls
+@cindex indirect function calls @subentry @code{@@}-notation
+@cindex function calls @subentry indirect @subentry @code{@@}-notation for
 The syntax is similar to that of a regular function call: an identifier
 immediately followed by an opening parenthesis, any arguments, and then
 a closing parenthesis, with the addition of a leading @samp{@@}
@@ -21819,8 +21867,8 @@ It contains the following chapters:
 @node Library Functions
 @chapter A Library of @command{awk} Functions
 @cindex libraries of @command{awk} functions
-@cindex functions, library
-@cindex functions, user-defined, library of
+@cindex functions @subentry library
+@cindex functions @subentry user-defined @subentry library of
 
 @ref{User-defined} describes how to write
 your own @command{awk} functions.  Writing functions is important, because
@@ -21867,7 +21915,7 @@ and would like to contribute them to the @command{awk} 
user community, see
 @ref{How To Contribute}, for more information.
 @end ifclear
 
-@cindex portability, example programs
+@cindex portability @subentry example programs
 The programs in this @value{CHAPTER} and in
 @ref{Sample Programs},
 freely use @command{gawk}-specific features.
@@ -21887,8 +21935,8 @@ to skip any remaining input in the input file.
 
 @item
 @c 12/2000: Thanks to Nelson Beebe for pointing out the output issue.
-@cindex case sensitivity, example programs
-@cindex @code{IGNORECASE} variable, in example programs
+@cindex case sensitivity @subentry example programs
+@cindex @code{IGNORECASE} variable @subentry in example programs
 Finally, some of the programs choose to ignore upper- and lowercase
 distinctions in their input. They do so by assigning one to @code{IGNORECASE}.
 You can achieve almost the same effect@footnote{The effects are
@@ -21925,19 +21973,19 @@ comparisons use only lowercase letters.
 @node Library Names
 @section Naming Library Function Global Variables
 
-@cindex names, arrays/variables
-@cindex names, functions
-@cindex namespace issues
-@cindex @command{awk} programs, documenting
-@cindex documentation, of @command{awk} programs
+@cindex names @subentry arrays/variables
+@cindex names @subentry functions
+@cindex naming issues
+@cindex @command{awk} programs @subentry documenting
+@cindex documentation @subentry of @command{awk} programs
 Due to the way the @command{awk} language evolved, variables are either
 @dfn{global} (usable by the entire program) or @dfn{local} (usable just by
 a specific function).  There is no intermediate state analogous to
 @code{static} variables in C.
 
-@cindex variables, global, for library functions
+@cindex variables @subentry global @subentry for library functions
 @cindex private variables
-@cindex variables, private
+@cindex variables @subentry private
 Library functions often need to have global variables that they can use to
 preserve state information between calls to the function---for example,
 @code{getopt()}'s variable @code{_opti}
@@ -21951,15 +21999,15 @@ either another library function or a user's main 
program.  For example, a
 name like @code{i} or @code{j} is not a good choice, because user programs
 often use variable names like these for their own purposes.
 
-@cindex programming conventions, private variable names
+@cindex programming conventions @subentry private variable names
 The example programs shown in this @value{CHAPTER} all start the names of their
 private variables with an underscore (@samp{_}).  Users generally don't use
 leading underscores in their variable names, so this convention immediately
 decreases the chances that the variable names will be accidentally shared
 with the user's program.
 
-@cindex @code{_} (underscore), in names of private variables
-@cindex underscore (@code{_}), in names of private variables
+@cindex @code{_} (underscore) @subentry in names of private variables
+@cindex underscore (@code{_}) @subentry in names of private variables
 In addition, several of the library functions use a prefix that helps
 indicate what function or set of functions use the variables---for example,
 @code{_pw_byname()} in the user database routines
@@ -21981,7 +22029,7 @@ The leading capital letter indicates that it is global, 
while the fact that
 the variable name is not all capital letters indicates that the variable is
 not one of @command{awk}'s predefined variables, such as @code{FS}.
 
-@cindex @option{--dump-variables} option, using for library functions
+@cindex @option{--dump-variables} option @subentry using for library functions
 It is also important that @emph{all} variables in library
 functions that do not need to save state are, in fact, declared
 local.@footnote{@command{gawk}'s @option{--dump-variables} command-line
@@ -21999,9 +22047,9 @@ function lib_func(x, y,    l1, l2)
 @}
 @end example
 
-@cindex arrays, associative, library functions and
-@cindex libraries of @command{awk} functions, associative arrays and
-@cindex functions, library, associative arrays and
+@cindex arrays @subentry associative @subentry library functions and
+@cindex libraries of @command{awk} functions @subentry associative arrays and
+@cindex functions @subentry library @subentry associative arrays and
 @cindex Tcl
 A different convention, common in the Tcl community, is to use a single
 associative array to hold the values needed by the library function(s), or
@@ -22149,9 +22197,10 @@ be tested with @command{gawk} and the results compared 
to the built-in
 
 @cindex assertions
 @cindex @code{assert()} function (C library)
-@cindex libraries of @command{awk} functions, assertions
-@cindex functions, library, assertions
-@cindex @command{awk} programs, lengthy, assertions
+@cindex C library functions @subentry @code{assert()}
+@cindex libraries of @command{awk} functions @subentry assertions
+@cindex functions @subentry library @subentry assertions
+@cindex @command{awk} programs @subentry lengthy @subentry assertions
 When writing large programs, it is often useful to know
 that a condition or set of conditions is true.  Before proceeding with a
 particular computation, you make a statement about what you believe to be
@@ -22182,6 +22231,7 @@ prog.c:5: assertion failed: a <= 5 && b >= 17.1
 @end example
 
 @cindex @code{assert()} user-defined function
+@cindex user-defined @subentry function @subentry @code{assert()}
 The C language makes it possible to turn the condition into a string for use
 in printing the diagnostic message.  This is not possible in @command{awk}, so
 this @code{assert()} function also requires a string version of the condition
@@ -22253,7 +22303,7 @@ If the assertion fails, you see a message similar to 
the following:
 mydata:1357: assertion failed: a <= 5 && b >= 17.1
 @end example
 
-@cindex @code{END} pattern, @code{assert()} user-defined function and
+@cindex @code{END} pattern @subentry @code{assert()} user-defined function and
 There is a small problem with this version of @code{assert()}.
 An @code{END} rule is automatically added
 to the program calling @code{assert()}.  Normally, if a program consists
@@ -22263,7 +22313,7 @@ attempts to read the input @value{DF}s or standard input
 (@pxref{Using BEGIN/END}),
 most likely causing the program to hang as it waits for input.
 
-@cindex @code{BEGIN} pattern, @code{assert()} user-defined function and
+@cindex @code{BEGIN} pattern @subentry @code{assert()} user-defined function 
and
 There is a simple workaround to this:
 make sure that such a @code{BEGIN} rule always ends
 with an @code{exit} statement.
@@ -22272,12 +22322,12 @@ with an @code{exit} statement.
 @subsection Rounding Numbers
 
 @cindex rounding numbers
-@cindex numbers, rounding
-@cindex libraries of @command{awk} functions, rounding numbers
-@cindex functions, library, rounding numbers
-@cindex @code{print} statement, @code{sprintf()} function and
-@cindex @code{printf} statement, @code{sprintf()} function and
-@cindex @code{sprintf()} function, @code{print}/@code{printf} statements and
+@cindex numbers @subentry rounding
+@cindex libraries of @command{awk} functions @subentry rounding numbers
+@cindex functions @subentry library @subentry rounding numbers
+@cindex @code{print} statement @subentry @code{sprintf()} function and
+@cindex @code{printf} statement @subentry @code{sprintf()} function and
+@cindex @code{sprintf()} function @subentry @code{print}/@code{printf} 
statements and
 The way @code{printf} and @code{sprintf()}
 (@pxref{Printf})
 perform rounding often depends upon the system's C @code{sprintf()}
@@ -22291,6 +22341,7 @@ traditional rounding; it might be useful if your 
@command{awk}'s @code{printf}
 does unbiased rounding:
 
 @cindex @code{round()} user-defined function
+@cindex user-defined @subentry function @subentry @code{round()}
 @example
 @c file eg/lib/round.awk
 # round.awk --- do normal rounding
@@ -22338,10 +22389,10 @@ function round(x,   ival, aval, fraction)
 
 @node Cliff Random Function
 @subsection The Cliff Random Number Generator
-@cindex random numbers, Cliff
+@cindex random numbers @subentry Cliff
 @cindex Cliff random numbers
-@cindex numbers, Cliff random
-@cindex functions, library, Cliff random numbers
+@cindex numbers @subentry Cliff random
+@cindex functions @subentry library @subentry Cliff random numbers
 
 The
 @uref{http://mathworld.wolfram.com/CliffRandomNumberGenerator.html, Cliff 
random number generator}
@@ -22350,6 +22401,7 @@ for randomness by showing no structure.''
 It is easily programmed, in less than 10 lines of @command{awk} code:
 
 @cindex @code{cliff_rand()} user-defined function
+@cindex user-defined @subentry function @subentry @code{cliff_rand()}
 @example
 @c file eg/lib/cliff_rand.awk
 # cliff_rand.awk --- generate Cliff random numbers
@@ -22384,10 +22436,10 @@ isn't random enough, you might try using this 
function instead.
 @node Ordinal Functions
 @subsection Translating Between Characters and Numbers
 
-@cindex libraries of @command{awk} functions, character values as numbers
-@cindex functions, library, character values as numbers
-@cindex characters, values of as numbers
-@cindex numbers, as values of characters
+@cindex libraries of @command{awk} functions @subentry character values as 
numbers
+@cindex functions @subentry library @subentry character values as numbers
+@cindex characters @subentry values of as numbers
+@cindex numbers @subentry as values of characters
 One commercial implementation of @command{awk} supplies a built-in function,
 @code{ord()}, which takes a character and returns the numeric value for that
 character in the machine's character set.  If the string passed to
@@ -22399,8 +22451,11 @@ Both functions are written very nicely in 
@command{awk}; there is no real
 reason to build them into the @command{awk} interpreter:
 
 @cindex @code{ord()} user-defined function
+@cindex user-defined @subentry function @subentry @code{ord()}
 @cindex @code{chr()} user-defined function
+@cindex user-defined @subentry function @subentry @code{chr()}
 @cindex @code{_ord_init()} user-defined function
+@cindex user-defined @subentry function @subentry @code{_ord_init()}
 @example
 @c file eg/lib/ord.awk
 # ord.awk --- do ord and chr
@@ -22509,10 +22564,10 @@ function.  It is commented out for production use.
 @node Join Function
 @subsection Merging an Array into a String
 
-@cindex libraries of @command{awk} functions, merging arrays into strings
-@cindex functions, library, merging arrays into strings
-@cindex strings, merging arrays into
-@cindex arrays, merging into strings
+@cindex libraries of @command{awk} functions @subentry merging arrays into 
strings
+@cindex functions @subentry library @subentry merging arrays into strings
+@cindex strings @subentry merging arrays into
+@cindex arrays @subentry merging into strings
 When doing string processing, it is often useful to be able to join
 all the strings in an array into one long string.  The following function,
 @code{join()}, accomplishes this task.  It is used later in several of
@@ -22527,6 +22582,7 @@ assumption, as the array was likely created with 
@code{split()}
 (@pxref{String Functions}):
 
 @cindex @code{join()} user-defined function
+@cindex user-defined @subentry function @subentry @code{join()}
 @example
 @c file eg/lib/join.awk
 # join.awk --- join an array into a string
@@ -22569,10 +22625,10 @@ more difficult than they really need to be.}
 @node Getlocaltime Function
 @subsection Managing the Time of Day
 
-@cindex libraries of @command{awk} functions, managing, time
-@cindex functions, library, managing time
-@cindex timestamps, formatted
-@cindex time, managing
+@cindex libraries of @command{awk} functions @subentry managing @subentry time
+@cindex functions @subentry library @subentry managing time
+@cindex timestamps @subentry formatted
+@cindex time @subentry managing
 The @code{systime()} and @code{strftime()} functions described in
 @ref{Time Functions}
 provide the minimum functionality necessary for dealing with the time of day
@@ -22585,6 +22641,7 @@ with preformatted time information.  It returns a 
string with the current
 time formatted in the same way as the @command{date} utility:
 
 @cindex @code{getlocaltime()} user-defined function
+@cindex user-defined @subentry function @subentry @code{getlocaltime()}
 @example
 @c file eg/lib/gettime.awk
 # getlocaltime.awk --- get the time of day in a usable format
@@ -22696,6 +22753,7 @@ The following function, based on a suggestion by Denis 
Shirokov,
 reads the entire contents of the named file in one shot:
 
 @cindex @code{readfile()} user-defined function
+@cindex user-defined @subentry function @subentry @code{readfile()}
 @example
 @c file eg/lib/readfile.awk
 # readfile.awk --- read an entire file at once
@@ -22825,9 +22883,9 @@ function shell_quote(s,             # parameter
 @node Data File Management
 @section @value{DDF} Management
 
-@cindex files, managing
-@cindex libraries of @command{awk} functions, managing, data files
-@cindex functions, library, managing data files
+@cindex files @subentry managing
+@cindex libraries of @command{awk} functions @subentry managing @subentry data 
files
+@cindex functions @subentry library @subentry managing data files
 This @value{SECTION} presents functions that are useful for managing
 command-line @value{DF}s.
 
@@ -22842,8 +22900,8 @@ command-line @value{DF}s.
 @node Filetrans Function
 @subsection Noting @value{DDF} Boundaries
 
-@cindex files, managing, data file boundaries
-@cindex files, initialization and cleanup
+@cindex files @subentry managing @subentry data file boundaries
+@cindex files @subentry initialization and cleanup
 The @code{BEGIN} and @code{END} rules are each executed exactly once, at
 the beginning and end of your @command{awk} program, respectively
 (@pxref{BEGIN/END}).
@@ -22908,7 +22966,9 @@ supplied in the ``main'' program, @code{endfile()} is 
called first.  Once
 again, the value of multiple @code{BEGIN} and @code{END} rules should be clear.
 
 @cindex @code{beginfile()} user-defined function
+@cindex user-defined @subentry function @subentry @code{beginfile()}
 @cindex @code{endfile()} user-defined function
+@cindex user-defined @subentry function @subentry @code{endfile()}
 If the same @value{DF} occurs twice in a row on the command line, then
 @code{endfile()} and @code{beginfile()} are not executed at the end of the
 first pass and at the beginning of the second pass.
@@ -22944,7 +23004,7 @@ END @{ endfile(_filename_) @}
 shows how this library function can be used and
 how it simplifies writing the main program.
 
-@cindex sidebar, So Why Does @command{gawk} Have @code{BEGINFILE} and 
@code{ENDFILE}?
+@cindex sidebar @subentry So Why Does @command{gawk} Have @code{BEGINFILE} and 
@code{ENDFILE}?
 @ifdocbook
 @docbook
 <sidebar><title>So Why Does @command{gawk} Have @code{BEGINFILE} and 
@code{ENDFILE}?</title>
@@ -22993,7 +23053,7 @@ For more information, refer to @ref{BEGINFILE/ENDFILE}.
 @node Rewind Function
 @subsection Rereading the Current File
 
-@cindex files, reading
+@cindex files @subentry reading
 Another request for a new built-in function was for a
 function that would make it possible to reread the current file.
 The requesting user didn't want to have to use @code{getline}
@@ -23006,6 +23066,7 @@ and then start over with it from the top.
 For lack of a better name, we'll call the function @code{rewind()}:
 
 @cindex @code{rewind()} user-defined function
+@cindex user-defined @subentry function @subentry @code{rewind()}
 @example
 @c file eg/lib/rewind.awk
 # rewind.awk --- rewind the current file and start over
@@ -23079,9 +23140,9 @@ $ @kbd{gawk -f rewind.awk -f test.awk data }
 @node File Checking
 @subsection Checking for Readable @value{DDF}s
 
-@cindex troubleshooting, readable data files
-@cindex readable data files@comma{} checking
-@cindex files, skipping
+@cindex troubleshooting @subentry readable data files
+@cindex readable data files, checking
+@cindex files @subentry skipping
 Normally, if you give @command{awk} a @value{DF} that isn't readable,
 it stops with a fatal error.  There are times when you might want to
 just ignore such files and keep going.@footnote{The @code{BEGINFILE}
@@ -23119,7 +23180,7 @@ BEGIN @{
 @c endfile
 @end example
 
-@cindex troubleshooting, @code{getline} function
+@cindex troubleshooting @subentry @code{getline} command
 This works, because the @code{getline} won't be fatal.
 Removing the element from @code{ARGV} with @code{delete}
 skips the file (because it's no longer in the list).
@@ -23197,7 +23258,7 @@ not @samp{<}.
 @subsection Treating Assignments as @value{FFN}s
 
 @cindex assignments as file names
-@cindex file names, assignments as
+@cindex file names @subentry assignments as
 Occasionally, you might not want @command{awk} to process command-line
 variable assignments
 (@pxref{Assignment Options}).
@@ -23256,12 +23317,12 @@ are left alone.
 @node Getopt Function
 @section Processing Command-Line Options
 
-@cindex libraries of @command{awk} functions, command-line options
-@cindex functions, library, command-line options
-@cindex command-line options, processing
-@cindex options, command-line, processing
-@cindex functions, library, C library
-@cindex arguments, processing
+@cindex libraries of @command{awk} functions @subentry command-line options
+@cindex functions @subentry library @subentry command-line options
+@cindex command line @subentry options @subentry processing
+@cindex options @subentry command-line @subentry processing
+@cindex functions @subentry library @subentry C library
+@cindex arguments @subentry processing
 Most utilities on POSIX-compatible systems take options on
 the command line that can be used to change the way a program behaves.
 @command{awk} is an example of such a program
@@ -23273,6 +23334,7 @@ The first occurrence on the command line of either 
@option{--} or a
 string that does not begin with @samp{-} ends the options.
 
 @cindex @code{getopt()} function (C library)
+@cindex C library functions @subentry @code{getopt()}
 Modern Unix systems provide a C function named @code{getopt()} for processing
 command-line arguments.  The programmer provides a string describing the
 one-letter options. If an option requires an argument, it is followed in the
@@ -23376,6 +23438,7 @@ We have left it alone, as using @code{substr()} is more 
portable.}
 The discussion that follows walks through the code a bit at a time:
 
 @cindex @code{getopt()} user-defined function
+@cindex user-defined @subentry function @subentry @code{getopt()}
 @example
 @c file eg/lib/getopt.awk
 # getopt.awk --- Do C library getopt(3) function in awk
@@ -23418,6 +23481,7 @@ a string of options (the @code{options} parameter).  If 
@code{options}
 has a zero length, @code{getopt()} immediately returns @minus{}1:
 
 @cindex @code{getopt()} user-defined function
+@cindex user-defined @subentry function @subentry @code{getopt()}
 @example
 @c file eg/lib/getopt.awk
 function getopt(argc, argv, options,    thisopt, i)
@@ -23615,10 +23679,10 @@ use @code{getopt()} to process their arguments.
 @node Passwd Functions
 @section Reading the User Database
 
-@cindex libraries of @command{awk} functions, user database, reading
-@cindex functions, library, user database@comma{} reading
-@cindex user database@comma{} reading
-@cindex database, users@comma{} reading
+@cindex libraries of @command{awk} functions @subentry user database, reading
+@cindex functions @subentry library @subentry user database, reading
+@cindex user database, reading
+@cindex database @subentry users, reading
 @cindex @code{PROCINFO} array
 The @code{PROCINFO} array
 (@pxref{Built-in Variables})
@@ -23632,12 +23696,14 @@ user database.  @xref{Group Functions}
 for a similar suite that retrieves information from the group database.
 
 @cindex @code{getpwent()} function (C library)
+@cindex C library functions @subentry @code{getpwent()}
 @cindex @code{getpwent()} user-defined function
-@cindex users, information about, retrieving
+@cindex user-defined @subentry function @subentry @code{getpwent()}
+@cindex users, information about @subentry retrieving
 @cindex login information
 @cindex account information
 @cindex password file
-@cindex files, password
+@cindex files @subentry password
 The POSIX standard does not define the file where user information is
 kept.  Instead, it provides the @code{<pwd.h>} header file
 and several C language subroutines for obtaining user information.
@@ -23765,8 +23831,8 @@ shell, such as Bash.
 A few lines representative of @command{pwcat}'s output are as follows:
 
 @cindex Jacobs, Andrew
-@cindex Robbins, Arnold
-@cindex Robbins, Miriam
+@cindex Robbins @subentry Arnold
+@cindex Robbins @subentry Miriam
 @example
 $ @kbd{pwcat}
 @print{} root:x:0:1:Operator:/:/bin/sh
@@ -23785,6 +23851,7 @@ information.  There are several functions here, 
corresponding to the C
 functions of the same names:
 
 @cindex @code{_pw_init()} user-defined function
+@cindex user-defined @subentry function @subentry @code{_pw_init()}
 @example
 @c file eg/lib/passwdawk.in
 # passwd.awk --- access password file information
@@ -23838,7 +23905,7 @@ function _pw_init(    oldfs, oldrs, olddol0, pwcat, 
using_fw, using_fpat)
 @c endfile
 @end example
 
-@cindex @code{BEGIN} pattern, @code{pwcat} program
+@cindex @code{BEGIN} pattern @subentry @code{pwcat} program
 The @code{BEGIN} rule sets a private variable to the directory where
 @command{pwcat} is stored.  Because it is used to help out an @command{awk} 
library
 routine, we have chosen to put it in @file{/usr/local/libexec/awk};
@@ -23851,8 +23918,8 @@ occurrence (@code{_pw_bycount}).
 The variable @code{_pw_inited} is used for efficiency, as @code{_pw_init()}
 needs to be called only once.
 
-@cindex @code{PROCINFO} array, testing the field splitting
-@cindex @code{getline} command, @code{_pw_init()} function
+@cindex @code{PROCINFO} array @subentry testing the field splitting
+@cindex @code{getline} command @subentry @code{_pw_init()} function
 Because this function uses @code{getline} to read information from
 @command{pwcat}, it first saves the values of @code{FS}, @code{RS}, and 
@code{$0}.
 It notes in the variable @code{using_fw} whether field splitting
@@ -23877,12 +23944,14 @@ if necessary), @code{RS}, and @code{$0}.
 The use of @code{@w{_pw_count}} is explained shortly.
 
 @cindex @code{getpwnam()} function (C library)
+@cindex C library functions @subentry @code{getpwnam()}
 The @code{getpwnam()} function takes a username as a string argument. If that
 user is in the database, it returns the appropriate line. Otherwise, it
 relies on the array reference to a nonexistent
 element to create the element with the null string as its value:
 
 @cindex @code{getpwnam()} user-defined function
+@cindex user-defined @subentry function @subentry @code{getpwnam()}
 @example
 @group
 @c file eg/lib/passwdawk.in
@@ -23896,11 +23965,13 @@ function getpwnam(name)
 @end example
 
 @cindex @code{getpwuid()} function (C library)
+@cindex C library functions @subentry @code{getpwuid()}
 Similarly, the @code{getpwuid()} function takes a user ID number
 argument. If that user number is in the database, it returns the
 appropriate line. Otherwise, it returns the null string:
 
 @cindex @code{getpwuid()} user-defined function
+@cindex user-defined @subentry function @subentry @code{getpwuid()}
 @example
 @c file eg/lib/passwdawk.in
 function getpwuid(uid)
@@ -23912,11 +23983,13 @@ function getpwuid(uid)
 @end example
 
 @cindex @code{getpwent()} function (C library)
+@cindex C library functions @subentry @code{getpwent()}
 The @code{getpwent()} function simply steps through the database, one entry at
 a time.  It uses @code{_pw_count} to track its current position in the
 @code{_pw_bycount} array:
 
 @cindex @code{getpwent()} user-defined function
+@cindex user-defined @subentry function @subentry @code{getpwent()}
 @example
 @c file eg/lib/passwdawk.in
 function getpwent()
@@ -23930,10 +24003,12 @@ function getpwent()
 @end example
 
 @cindex @code{endpwent()} function (C library)
+@cindex C library functions @subentry @code{endpwent()}
 The @code{@w{endpwent()}} function resets @code{@w{_pw_count}} to zero, so that
 subsequent calls to @code{getpwent()} start over again:
 
 @cindex @code{endpwent()} user-defined function
+@cindex user-defined @subentry function @subentry @code{endpwent()}
 @example
 @c file eg/lib/passwdawk.in
 function endpwent()
@@ -23968,17 +24043,19 @@ uses these functions.
 @node Group Functions
 @section Reading the Group Database
 
-@cindex libraries of @command{awk} functions, group database, reading
-@cindex functions, library, group database@comma{} reading
+@cindex libraries of @command{awk} functions @subentry group database, reading
+@cindex functions @subentry library @subentry group database, reading
 @cindex group database, reading
-@cindex database, group, reading
-@cindex @code{PROCINFO} array, group membership and
+@cindex database @subentry group, reading
+@cindex @code{PROCINFO} array @subentry group membership and
 @cindex @code{getgrent()} function (C library)
+@cindex C library functions @subentry @code{getgrent()}
 @cindex @code{getgrent()} user-defined function
-@cindex groups@comma{} information about
+@cindex user-defined @subentry function @subentry @code{getgrent()}
+@cindex groups, information about
 @cindex account information
 @cindex group file
-@cindex files, group
+@cindex files @subentry group
 Much of the discussion presented in
 @ref{Passwd Functions}
 applies to the group database as well.  Although there has traditionally
@@ -24114,8 +24191,9 @@ $ @kbd{grcat}
 Here are the functions for obtaining information from the group database.
 There are several, modeled after the C library functions of the same names:
 
-@cindex @code{getline} command, @code{_gr_init()} user-defined function
+@cindex @code{getline} command @subentry @code{_gr_init()} user-defined 
function
 @cindex @code{_gr_init()} user-defined function
+@cindex user-defined @subentry function @subentry @code{_gr_init()}
 @example
 @c file eg/lib/groupawk.in
 # group.awk --- functions for dealing with the group file
@@ -24229,6 +24307,7 @@ initializes @code{_gr_count} to zero
 (it is used later), and makes @code{_gr_inited} nonzero.
 
 @cindex @code{getgrnam()} function (C library)
+@cindex C library functions @subentry @code{getgrnam()}
 The @code{getgrnam()} function takes a group name as its argument, and if that
 group exists, it is returned.
 Otherwise, it
@@ -24236,6 +24315,7 @@ relies on the array reference to a nonexistent
 element to create the element with the null string as its value:
 
 @cindex @code{getgrnam()} user-defined function
+@cindex user-defined @subentry function @subentry @code{getgrnam()}
 @example
 @c file eg/lib/groupawk.in
 function getgrnam(group)
@@ -24247,10 +24327,12 @@ function getgrnam(group)
 @end example
 
 @cindex @code{getgrgid()} function (C library)
+@cindex C library functions @subentry @code{getgrgid()}
 The @code{getgrgid()} function is similar; it takes a numeric group ID and
 looks up the information associated with that group ID:
 
 @cindex @code{getgrgid()} user-defined function
+@cindex user-defined @subentry function @subentry @code{getgrgid()}
 @example
 @c file eg/lib/groupawk.in
 function getgrgid(gid)
@@ -24262,10 +24344,12 @@ function getgrgid(gid)
 @end example
 
 @cindex @code{getgruser()} function (C library)
+@cindex C library functions @subentry @code{getgruser()}
 The @code{getgruser()} function does not have a C counterpart. It takes a
 username and returns the list of groups that have the user as a member:
 
-@cindex @code{getgruser()} function, user-defined
+@cindex @code{getgruser()} user-defined function
+@cindex user-defined @subentry function @subentry @code{getgruser()}
 @example
 @c file eg/lib/groupawk.in
 function getgruser(user)
@@ -24277,10 +24361,12 @@ function getgruser(user)
 @end example
 
 @cindex @code{getgrent()} function (C library)
+@cindex C library functions @subentry @code{getgrent()}
 The @code{getgrent()} function steps through the database one entry at a time.
 It uses @code{_gr_count} to track its position in the list:
 
 @cindex @code{getgrent()} user-defined function
+@cindex user-defined @subentry function @subentry @code{getgrent()}
 @example
 @c file eg/lib/groupawk.in
 function getgrent()
@@ -24296,10 +24382,12 @@ function getgrent()
 @end example
 
 @cindex @code{endgrent()} function (C library)
+@cindex C library functions @subentry @code{endgrent()}
 The @code{endgrent()} function resets @code{_gr_count} to zero so that 
@code{getgrent()} can
 start over again:
 
 @cindex @code{endgrent()} user-defined function
+@cindex user-defined @subentry function @subentry @code{endgrent()}
 @example
 @c file eg/lib/groupawk.in
 function endgrent()
@@ -24336,6 +24424,7 @@ You call it with the array and a string representing 
the name
 of the array:
 
 @cindex @code{walk_array()} user-defined function
+@cindex user-defined @subentry function @subentry @code{walk_array()}
 @example
 @c file eg/lib/walkarray.awk
 function walk_array(arr, name,      i)
@@ -24561,7 +24650,7 @@ output identical to that of the original version.
 
 @node Sample Programs
 @chapter Practical @command{awk} Programs
-@cindex @command{awk} programs, examples of
+@cindex @command{awk} programs @subentry examples of
 
 @c FULLXREF ON
 @ref{Library Functions},
@@ -24630,7 +24719,7 @@ cut.awk -- -c1-8 myfiles > results
 
 @node Clones
 @section Reinventing Wheels for Fun and Profit
-@cindex POSIX, programs@comma{} implementing in @command{awk}
+@cindex POSIX @subentry programs, implementing in @command{awk}
 
 This @value{SECTION} presents a number of POSIX utilities implemented in
 @command{awk}.  Reinventing these programs in @command{awk} is often enjoyable,
@@ -24661,8 +24750,8 @@ The programs are presented in alphabetical order.
 
 @cindex @command{cut} utility
 @cindex @command{cut} utility
-@cindex fields, cutting
-@cindex columns, cutting
+@cindex fields @subentry cutting
+@cindex columns @subentry cutting
 The @command{cut} utility selects, or ``cuts,'' characters or fields
 from its standard input and sends them to its standard output.
 Fields are separated by TABs by default,
@@ -24742,8 +24831,8 @@ function usage()
 @c endfile
 @end example
 
-@cindex @code{BEGIN} pattern, running @command{awk} programs and
-@cindex @code{FS} variable, running @command{awk} programs and
+@cindex @code{BEGIN} pattern @subentry running @command{awk} programs and
+@cindex @code{FS} variable @subentry running @command{awk} programs and
 Next comes a @code{BEGIN} rule that parses the command-line options.
 It sets @code{FS} to a single TAB character, because that is @command{cut}'s
 default field separator. The rule then sets the output field separator to be 
the
@@ -24789,7 +24878,7 @@ BEGIN @{
 @c endfile
 @end example
 
-@cindex field separators, spaces as
+@cindex field separator @subentry spaces as
 The code must take
 special care when the field delimiter is a space.  Using
 a single space (@code{@w{" "}}) for the value of @code{FS} is
@@ -24981,9 +25070,9 @@ of picking the input line apart by characters.
 @node Egrep Program
 @subsection Searching for Regular Expressions in Files
 
-@cindex regular expressions, searching for
-@cindex searching, files for regular expressions
-@cindex files, searching for regular expressions
+@cindex regular expressions @subentry searching for
+@cindex searching @subentry files for regular expressions
+@cindex files @subentry searching for regular expressions
 @cindex @command{egrep} utility
 The @command{egrep} utility searches files for patterns.  It uses regular
 expressions that are almost identical to those available in @command{awk}
@@ -25196,8 +25285,8 @@ print the @value{FN}, and then skip to the next file 
with @code{nextfile}.
 Finally, each line is printed, with a leading @value{FN} and colon
 if necessary:
 
-@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point), @code{!} operator
-@cindex exclamation point (@code{!}), @code{!} operator
+@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point) @subentry @code{!} operator
+@cindex exclamation point (@code{!}) @subentry @code{!} operator
 @example
 @c file eg/prog/egrep.awk
 @{
@@ -25257,8 +25346,8 @@ function usage()
 @node Id Program
 @subsection Printing Out User Information
 
-@cindex printing, user information
-@cindex users, information about, printing
+@cindex printing @subentry user information
+@cindex users, information about @subentry printing
 @cindex @command{id} utility
 The @command{id} utility lists a user's real and effective user ID numbers,
 real and effective group ID numbers, and the user's group set, if any.
@@ -25271,7 +25360,7 @@ $ @kbd{id}
 @print{} uid=1000(arnold) gid=1000(arnold) 
groups=1000(arnold),4(adm),7(lp),27(sudo)
 @end example
 
-@cindex @code{PROCINFO} array, user and group ID numbers and
+@cindex @code{PROCINFO} array @subentry user and group ID numbers and
 This information is part of what is provided by @command{gawk}'s
 @code{PROCINFO} array (@pxref{Built-in Variables}).
 However, the @command{id} utility provides a more palatable output than just
@@ -25398,7 +25487,7 @@ the empty string into this function saves several lines 
of code.
 
 @c FIXME: One day, update to current POSIX version of split
 
-@cindex files, splitting
+@cindex files @subentry splitting
 @cindex @code{split} utility
 The @command{split} program splits large text files into smaller pieces.
 Usage is as follows:@footnote{This is the traditional usage. The
@@ -25540,8 +25629,8 @@ way as to solve the EBCDIC issue as well.
 @node Tee Program
 @subsection Duplicating Output into Multiple Files
 
-@cindex files, multiple@comma{} duplicating output into
-@cindex output, duplicating into files
+@cindex files @subentry multiple, duplicating output into
+@cindex output @subentry duplicating into files
 @cindex @code{tee} utility
 The @code{tee} program is known as a ``pipe fitting.''  @code{tee} copies
 its standard input to its standard output and also duplicates it to the
@@ -25664,8 +25753,8 @@ END @{
 
 @c FIXME: One day, update to current POSIX version of uniq
 
-@cindex printing, unduplicated lines of text
-@cindex text@comma{} printing, unduplicated lines of
+@cindex printing @subentry unduplicated lines of text
+@cindex text, printing @subentry unduplicated lines of
 @cindex @command{uniq} utility
 The @command{uniq} utility reads sorted lines of data on its standard
 input, and by default removes duplicate lines.  In other words, it only
@@ -25945,11 +26034,11 @@ suggestion.
 
 @c FIXME: One day, update to current POSIX version of wc
 
-@cindex counting
-@cindex input files, counting elements in
-@cindex words, counting
-@cindex characters, counting
-@cindex lines, counting
+@cindex counting words, lines, and characters
+@cindex input files @subentry counting elements in
+@cindex words @subentry counting
+@cindex characters @subentry counting
+@cindex lines @subentry counting
 @cindex @command{wc} utility
 The @command{wc} (word count) utility counts lines, words, and characters in
 one or more input files. Its usage is as follows:
@@ -26147,9 +26236,9 @@ We hope you find them both interesting and enjoyable.
 @node Dupword Program
 @subsection Finding Duplicated Words in a Document
 
-@cindex words, duplicate@comma{} searching for
-@cindex searching, for words
-@cindex documents@comma{} searching
+@cindex words @subentry duplicate, searching for
+@cindex searching @subentry for words
+@cindex documents, searching
 A common error when writing large amounts of prose is to accidentally
 duplicate words.  Typically you will see this in text as something like ``the
 the program does the following@dots{}''  When the text is online, often
@@ -26217,7 +26306,7 @@ word, comparing it to the previous one:
 @node Alarm Program
 @subsection An Alarm Clock Program
 @cindex insomnia, cure for
-@cindex Robbins, Arnold
+@cindex Robbins @subentry Arnold
 @quotation
 @i{Nothing cures insomnia like a ringing alarm clock.}
 @author Arnold Robbins
@@ -26249,7 +26338,7 @@ Aharon Robbins <address@hidden> wrote:
 @author Erik Quanstrom
 @end quotation
 
-@cindex time, alarm clock example program
+@cindex time @subentry alarm clock example program
 @cindex alarm clock example program
 The following program is a simple ``alarm clock'' program.
 You give it a time of day and an optional message.  At the specified time,
@@ -26260,6 +26349,7 @@ repetitions.
 This program uses the @code{getlocaltime()} function from
 @ref{Getlocaltime Function}.
 
+@cindex ASCII
 All the work is done in the @code{BEGIN} rule.  The first part is argument
 checking and setting of defaults: the delay, the count, and the message to
 print.  If the user supplied a message without the ASCII BEL
@@ -26405,7 +26495,7 @@ seconds are necessary:
 @node Translate Program
 @subsection Transliterating Characters
 
-@cindex characters, transliterating
+@cindex characters @subentry transliterating
 @cindex @command{tr} utility
 The system @command{tr} utility transliterates characters.  For example, it is
 often used to map uppercase letters into lowercase for further processing:
@@ -26557,8 +26647,8 @@ for inspiration.
 @node Labels Program
 @subsection Printing Mailing Labels
 
-@cindex printing, mailing labels
-@cindex mailing labels@comma{} printing
+@cindex printing @subentry mailing labels
+@cindex mailing labels, printing
 Here is a ``real-world''@footnote{``Real world'' is defined as
 ``a program actually used to get something done.''}
 program.  This
@@ -26689,7 +26779,7 @@ END @{
 @node Word Sorting
 @subsection Generating Word-Usage Counts
 
-@cindex words, usage counts@comma{} generating
+@cindex words @subentry usage counts, generating
 
 When working with large amounts of text, it can be interesting to know
 how often different words appear.  For example, an author may overuse
@@ -26820,7 +26910,7 @@ to use the @command{sort} program.
 @node History Sorting
 @subsection Removing Duplicates from Unsorted Text
 
-@cindex lines, duplicate@comma{} removing
+@cindex lines @subentry duplicate, removing
 The @command{uniq} program
 (@pxref{Uniq Program})
 removes duplicate lines from @emph{sorted} data.
@@ -26890,8 +26980,8 @@ seen.
 @node Extract Program
 @subsection Extracting Programs from Texinfo Source Files
 
-@cindex Texinfo, extracting programs from source files
-@cindex files, Texinfo@comma{} extracting programs from
+@cindex Texinfo @subentry extracting programs from source files
+@cindex files @subentry Texinfo, extracting programs from
 @ifnotinfo
 Both this chapter and the previous chapter
 (@ref{Library Functions})
@@ -27267,8 +27357,8 @@ value of @code{RT}.
 @node Igawk Program
 @subsection An Easy Way to Use Library Functions
 
-@cindex libraries of @command{awk} functions, example program for using
-@cindex functions, library, example program for using
+@cindex libraries of @command{awk} functions @subentry example program for 
using
+@cindex functions @subentry library @subentry example program for using
 In @ref{Include Files}, we saw how @command{gawk} provides a built-in
 file-inclusion capability.  However, this is a @command{gawk} extension.
 This @value{SECTION} provides the motivation for making file inclusion
@@ -28100,10 +28190,10 @@ things considerably.  What problem does this engender 
though?
 @c answer, reading from "-" or /dev/stdin
 
 @cindex search paths
-@cindex search paths, for source files
-@cindex source files@comma{} search path for
-@cindex files, source@comma{} search path for
-@cindex directories, searching
+@cindex search paths @subentry for source files
+@cindex source files, search path for
+@cindex files @subentry source, search path for
+@cindex directories @subentry searching @subentry for source files
 @item
 As an additional example of the idea that it is not always necessary to
 add new features to a program, consider the idea of having two files in
@@ -28169,8 +28259,8 @@ It contains the following chapters:
 
 @node Advanced Features
 @chapter Advanced Features of @command{gawk}
-@cindex @command{gawk}, features, advanced
-@cindex advanced features, @command{gawk}
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry features @subentry advanced
+@cindex advanced features @subentry @command{gawk}
 @ignore
 Contributed by: Peter Langston <pud!address@hidden>
 
@@ -28238,9 +28328,9 @@ discusses the ability to dynamically add new built-in 
functions to
 @node Nondecimal Data
 @section Allowing Nondecimal Input Data
 @cindex @option{--non-decimal-data} option
-@cindex advanced features, nondecimal input data
-@cindex input, data@comma{} nondecimal
-@cindex constants, nondecimal
+@cindex advanced features @subentry nondecimal input data
+@cindex input @subentry data, nondecimal
+@cindex constants @subentry nondecimal
 
 If you run @command{gawk} with the @option{--non-decimal-data} option,
 you can have nondecimal values in your input data:
@@ -28278,9 +28368,9 @@ Because it is common to have decimal data with leading 
zeros, and because
 using this facility could lead to surprising results, the default is to leave 
it
 disabled.  If you want it, you must explicitly request it.
 
-@cindex programming conventions, @code{--non-decimal-data} option
-@cindex @option{--non-decimal-data} option, @code{strtonum()} function and
-@cindex @code{strtonum()} function (@command{gawk}), @code{--non-decimal-data} 
option and
+@cindex programming conventions @subentry @code{--non-decimal-data} option
+@cindex @option{--non-decimal-data} option @subentry @code{strtonum()} 
function and
+@cindex @code{strtonum()} function (@command{gawk}) @subentry 
@code{--non-decimal-data} option and
 @quotation CAUTION
 @emph{Use of this option is not recommended.}
 It can break old programs very badly.
@@ -28571,6 +28661,7 @@ function should use the @code{isarray()} function
 (@pxref{Type Functions})
 to check for this, and choose a defined sorting order for subarrays.
 
+@cindex POSIX mode
 All sorting based on @code{PROCINFO["sorted_in"]}
 is disabled in POSIX mode,
 because the @code{PROCINFO} array is not special in that case.
@@ -28587,11 +28678,14 @@ sorted array traversal is not the default.
 @node Array Sorting Functions
 @subsection Sorting Array Values and Indices with @command{gawk}
 
-@cindex arrays, sorting
+@cindex arrays @subentry sorting @subentry @code{asort()} function 
(@command{gawk})
+@cindex arrays @subentry sorting @subentry @code{asorti()} function 
(@command{gawk})
 @cindexgawkfunc{asort}
-@cindex @code{asort()} function (@command{gawk}), arrays@comma{} sorting
+@cindex @code{asort()} function (@command{gawk}) @subentry arrays, sorting
+@cindex @code{asort()} function (@command{gawk}) @subentry side effects
 @cindexgawkfunc{asorti}
-@cindex @code{asorti()} function (@command{gawk}), arrays@comma{} sorting
+@cindex @code{asorti()} function (@command{gawk}) @subentry arrays, sorting
+@cindex @code{asorti()} function (@command{gawk}) @subentry side effects
 @cindex sort function, arrays, sorting
 In most @command{awk} implementations, sorting an array requires writing
 a @code{sort()} function.  This can be educational for exploring
@@ -28615,7 +28709,8 @@ The default comparison is based on the type of the 
elements
 All numeric values come before all string values,
 which in turn come before all subarrays.
 
-@cindex side effects, @code{asort()} function
+@cindex side effects @subentry @code{asort()} function
+@cindex side effects @subentry @code{asorti()} function
 An important side effect of calling @code{asort()} is that
 @emph{the array's original indices are irrevocably lost}.
 As this isn't always desirable, @code{asort()} accepts a
@@ -28684,9 +28779,9 @@ both arrays use the values.
 @end quotation
 
 @c Document It And Call It A Feature. Sigh.
-@cindex @command{gawk}, @code{IGNORECASE} variable in
-@cindex arrays, sorting, @code{IGNORECASE} variable and
-@cindex @code{IGNORECASE} variable, array sorting functions and
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry @code{IGNORECASE} variable in
+@cindex arrays @subentry sorting @subentry @code{IGNORECASE} variable and
+@cindex @code{IGNORECASE} variable @subentry array sorting functions and
 Because @code{IGNORECASE} affects string comparisons, the value
 of @code{IGNORECASE} also affects sorting for both @code{asort()} and 
@code{asorti()}.
 Note also that the locale's sorting order does @emph{not}
@@ -28785,7 +28880,7 @@ Mike Brennan
 @end smallexample
 @end ignore
 
-@cindex advanced features, processes@comma{} communicating with
+@cindex advanced features @subentry processes, communicating with
 @cindex processes, two-way communications with
 It is often useful to be able to
 send data to a separate program for
@@ -28816,10 +28911,10 @@ Brennan suggests the use of @command{rand()} to 
generate unique
 remain more difficult to use than two-way pipes.} @c 8/2014
 
 @cindex coprocesses
-@cindex input/output, two-way
-@cindex @code{|} (vertical bar), @code{|&} operator (I/O)
-@cindex vertical bar (@code{|}), @code{|&} operator (I/O)
-@cindex @command{csh} utility, @code{|&} operator, comparison with
+@cindex input/output @subentry two-way
+@cindex @code{|} (vertical bar) @subentry @code{|&} operator (I/O)
+@cindex vertical bar (@code{|}) @subentry @code{|&} operator (I/O)
+@cindex @command{csh} utility @subentry @code{|&} operator, comparison with
 However, with @command{gawk}, it is possible to
 open a @emph{two-way} pipe to another process.  The second process is
 termed a @dfn{coprocess}, as it runs in parallel with @command{gawk}.
@@ -28855,8 +28950,8 @@ standard error goes. It is not possible to read the 
child's
 standard error separately.
 
 @cindex deadlocks
-@cindex buffering, input/output
-@cindex @code{getline} command, deadlock and
+@cindex buffering @subentry input/output
+@cindex @code{getline} command @subentry deadlock and
 @item
 I/O buffering may be a problem.  @command{gawk} automatically
 flushes all output down the pipe to the coprocess.
@@ -28867,7 +28962,7 @@ known as @dfn{deadlock}, where each process is waiting 
for the
 other one to do something.
 @end itemize
 
-@cindex @code{close()} function, two-way pipes and
+@cindex @code{close()} function @subentry two-way pipes and
 It is possible to close just one end of the two-way pipe to
 a coprocess, by supplying a second argument to the @code{close()}
 function of either @code{"to"} or @code{"from"}
@@ -28876,7 +28971,7 @@ These strings tell @command{gawk} to close the end of 
the pipe
 that sends data to the coprocess or the end that reads from it,
 respectively.
 
-@cindex @command{sort} utility, coprocesses and
+@cindex @command{sort} utility @subentry coprocesses and
 This is particularly necessary in order to use
 the system @command{sort} utility as part of a coprocess;
 @command{sort} must read @emph{all} of its input
@@ -28911,6 +29006,7 @@ indication.  This causes @command{sort} to sort the 
data and write the
 sorted data back to the @command{gawk} program.  Once all of the data
 has been read, @command{gawk} terminates the coprocess and exits.
 
+@cindex ASCII
 As a side note, the assignment @samp{LC_ALL=C} in the @command{sort}
 command ensures traditional Unix (ASCII) sorting from @command{sort}.
 This is not strictly necessary here, but it's good to know how to do this.
@@ -28933,8 +29029,8 @@ or @code{getline}.
 @xref{Nonfatal}, for more information.
 @end quotation
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, @code{PROCINFO} array in
-@cindex @code{PROCINFO} array, communications via ptys and
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry @code{PROCINFO} array in
+@cindex @code{PROCINFO} array @subentry communications via ptys and
 You may also use pseudo-ttys (ptys) for
 two-way communication instead of pipes, if your system supports them.
 This is done on a per-command basis, by setting a special element
@@ -29021,15 +29117,15 @@ And now, magically, it works!
 
 @node TCP/IP Networking
 @section Using @command{gawk} for Network Programming
-@cindex advanced features, network programming
-@cindex networks, programming
+@cindex advanced features @subentry network programming
+@cindex networks @subentry programming
 @cindex TCP/IP
 @cindex @code{/inet/@dots{}} special files (@command{gawk})
-@cindex files, @code{/inet/@dots{}} (@command{gawk})
+@cindex files @subentry @code{/inet/@dots{}} (@command{gawk})
 @cindex @code{/inet4/@dots{}} special files (@command{gawk})
-@cindex files, @code{/inet4/@dots{}} (@command{gawk})
+@cindex files @subentry @code{/inet4/@dots{}} (@command{gawk})
 @cindex @code{/inet6/@dots{}} special files (@command{gawk})
-@cindex files, @code{/inet6/@dots{}} (@command{gawk})
+@cindex files @subentry @code{/inet6/@dots{}} (@command{gawk})
 @cindex @code{EMRED}
 @ifnotdocbook
 @quotation
@@ -29084,6 +29180,7 @@ respectively.  TCP should be used for most applications.
 
 @item local-port
 @cindex @code{getaddrinfo()} function (C library)
+@cindex C library functions @subentry @code{getaddrinfo()}
 The local TCP or UDP port number to use.  Use a port number of @samp{0}
 when you want the system to pick a port. This is what you should do
 when writing a TCP or UDP client.
@@ -29101,7 +29198,7 @@ Again, use @samp{0} if you don't care, or else a 
well-known
 service name.
 @end table
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, @code{ERRNO} variable in
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry @code{ERRNO} variable in
 @cindex @code{ERRNO} variable
 @quotation NOTE
 Failure in opening a two-way socket will result in a nonfatal error
@@ -29148,10 +29245,10 @@ no way to access services available over Secure 
Socket Layer
 
 @node Profiling
 @section Profiling Your @command{awk} Programs
-@cindex @command{awk} programs, profiling
+@cindex @command{awk} programs @subentry profiling
 @cindex profiling @command{awk} programs
 @cindex @code{awkprof.out} file
-@cindex files, @code{awkprof.out}
+@cindex files @subentry @code{awkprof.out}
 
 You may produce execution traces of your @command{awk} programs.
 This is done by passing the option @option{--profile} to @command{gawk}.
@@ -29219,8 +29316,8 @@ Here is the @file{awkprof.out} that results from 
running the
 illustrates that @command{awk} programmers sometimes get up very early
 in the morning to work):
 
-@cindex @code{BEGIN} pattern, profiling and
-@cindex @code{END} pattern, profiling and
+@cindex @code{BEGIN} pattern @subentry profiling and
+@cindex @code{END} pattern @subentry profiling and
 @example
     # gawk profile, created Mon Sep 29 05:16:21 2014
 
@@ -29284,7 +29381,7 @@ Multiple @code{BEGIN} and @code{END} rules retain their
 separate identities, as do
 multiple @code{BEGINFILE} and @code{ENDFILE} rules.
 
-@cindex patterns, counts, in a profile
+@cindex patterns @subentry counts, in a profile
 @item
 Pattern--action rules have two counts.
 The first count, to the left of the rule, shows how many times
@@ -29304,7 +29401,7 @@ is a count showing how many times the condition was 
true.
 The count for the @code{else}
 indicates how many times the test failed.
 
-@cindex loops, count for header, in a profile
+@cindex loops @subentry count for header, in a profile
 @item
 The count for a loop header (such as @code{for}
 or @code{while}) shows how many times the loop test was executed.
@@ -29312,8 +29409,8 @@ or @code{while}) shows how many times the loop test was 
executed.
 statement in a rule to determine how many times the rule was executed.
 If the first statement is a loop, the count is misleading.)
 
-@cindex functions, user-defined, counts@comma{} in a profile
-@cindex user-defined, functions, counts@comma{} in a profile
+@cindex functions @subentry user-defined @subentry counts, in a profile
+@cindex user-defined @subentry functions @subentry counts, in a profile
 @item
 For user-defined functions, the count next to the @code{function}
 keyword indicates how many times the function was called.
@@ -29327,8 +29424,8 @@ The layout uses ``K&R'' style with TABs.
 Braces are used everywhere, even when
 the body of an @code{if}, @code{else}, or loop is only a single statement.
 
-@cindex @code{()} (parentheses), in a profile
-@cindex parentheses @code{()}, in a profile
+@cindex @code{()} (parentheses) @subentry in a profile
+@cindex parentheses @code{()} @subentry in a profile
 @item
 Parentheses are used only where needed, as indicated by the structure
 of the program and the precedence rules.
@@ -29383,8 +29480,9 @@ which is correct, but possibly unexpected.
 (If a program uses both @samp{print $0} and plain
 @samp{print}, that distinction is retained.)
 
-@cindex profiling @command{awk} programs, dynamically
-@cindex @command{gawk} program, dynamic profiling
+@cindex profiling @command{awk} programs @subentry dynamically
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry dynamic profiling
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry profiling programs
 @cindex dynamic profiling
 Besides creating profiles when a program has completed,
 @command{gawk} can produce a profile while it is running.
@@ -29398,10 +29496,10 @@ $ @kbd{gawk --profile -f myprog &}
 [1] 13992
 @end example
 
-@cindex @command{kill} command@comma{} dynamic profiling
+@cindex @command{kill} command, dynamic profiling
 @cindex @code{USR1} signal, for dynamic profiling
 @cindex @code{SIGUSR1} signal, for dynamic profiling
-@cindex signals, @code{USR1}/@code{SIGUSR1}, for profiling
+@cindex signals @subentry @code{USR1}/@code{SIGUSR1}, for profiling
 @noindent
 The shell prints a job number and process ID number; in this case, 13992.
 Use the @command{kill} command to send the @code{USR1} signal
@@ -29434,16 +29532,16 @@ profile file.
 
 @cindex @code{HUP} signal, for dynamic profiling
 @cindex @code{SIGHUP} signal, for dynamic profiling
-@cindex signals, @code{HUP}/@code{SIGHUP}, for profiling
+@cindex signals @subentry @code{HUP}/@code{SIGHUP}, for profiling
 If you use the @code{HUP} signal instead of the @code{USR1} signal,
 @command{gawk} produces the profile and the function call trace and then exits.
 
 @cindex @code{INT} signal (MS-Windows)
 @cindex @code{SIGINT} signal (MS-Windows)
-@cindex signals, @code{INT}/@code{SIGINT} (MS-Windows)
+@cindex signals @subentry @code{INT}/@code{SIGINT} (MS-Windows)
 @cindex @code{QUIT} signal (MS-Windows)
 @cindex @code{SIGQUIT} signal (MS-Windows)
-@cindex signals, @code{QUIT}/@code{SIGQUIT} (MS-Windows)
+@cindex signals @subentry @code{QUIT}/@code{SIGQUIT} (MS-Windows)
 When @command{gawk} runs on MS-Windows systems, it uses the
 @code{INT} and @code{QUIT} signals for producing the profile, and in
 the case of the @code{INT} signal, @command{gawk} exits.  This is
@@ -29463,8 +29561,8 @@ Once upon a time, the @option{--pretty-print} option 
would also run
 your program.  This is no longer the case.
 @end quotation
 
-@cindex profiling, pretty-printing, difference with
-@cindex pretty-printing, profiling, difference with
+@cindex profiling, pretty printing, difference with
+@cindex pretty printing @subentry profiling, difference with
 There is a significant difference between the output created when
 profiling, and that created when pretty-printing.  Pretty-printed output
 preserves the original comments that were in the program, although their
@@ -29548,9 +29646,9 @@ countries, they were able to sell more systems.
 As a result, internationalization and localization
 of programs and software systems became a common practice.
 
-@cindex internationalization, localization
-@cindex @command{gawk}, internationalization and, See internationalization
-@cindex internationalization, localization, @command{gawk} and
+@cindex internationalization @subentry localization
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry internationalization 
@seeentry{internationalization}
+@cindex internationalization @subentry localization @subentry @command{gawk} 
and
 For many years, the ability to provide internationalization
 was largely restricted to programs written in C and C++.
 This @value{CHAPTER} describes the underlying library @command{gawk}
@@ -29576,8 +29674,8 @@ a requirement.
 @section Internationalization and Localization
 
 @cindex internationalization
-@cindex localization, See internationalization@comma{} localization
-@cindex localization
+@cindex localization @seeentry{internationalization, localization}
+@cindex internationalization @subentry localization
 @dfn{Internationalization} means writing (or modifying) a program once,
 in such a way that it can use multiple languages without requiring
 further source code changes.
@@ -29602,7 +29700,7 @@ port doesn't support GNU @command{gettext}.
 Therefore, these features are not available
 if you are using one of those operating systems. Sorry.}
 
-@cindex portability, @command{gettext} library and
+@cindex portability @subentry @command{gettext} library and
 When using GNU @command{gettext}, each application has its own
 @dfn{text domain}.  This is a unique name, such as @samp{kpilot} or 
@samp{gawk},
 that identifies the application.
@@ -29624,15 +29722,16 @@ A table with strings of option names is not (e.g., 
@command{gawk}'s
 language).
 
 @cindex @code{textdomain()} function (C library)
+@cindex C library functions @subentry @code{textdomain()}
 @item
 The programmer indicates the application's text domain
 (@command{"guide"}) to the @command{gettext} library,
 by calling the @code{textdomain()} function.
 
 @cindex @code{.pot} files
-@cindex files, @code{.pot}
-@cindex portable object template files
-@cindex files, portable object template
+@cindex files @subentry @code{.pot}
+@cindex portable object @subentry template files
+@cindex files @subentry portable object @subentry template file (@file{.pot})
 @item
 Messages from the application are extracted from the source code and
 collected into a portable object template file (@file{guide.pot}),
@@ -29642,9 +29741,9 @@ The original (usually English) messages serve as the 
key for
 lookup of the translations.
 
 @cindex @code{.po} files
-@cindex files, @code{.po}
-@cindex portable object files
-@cindex files, portable object
+@cindex files @subentry @code{.po}
+@cindex portable object @subentry files
+@cindex files @subentry portable object
 @item
 For each language with a translator, @file{guide.pot}
 is copied to a portable object file (@code{.po})
@@ -29652,9 +29751,9 @@ and translations are created and shipped with the 
application.
 For example, there might be a @file{fr.po} for a French translation.
 
 @cindex @code{.gmo} files
-@cindex files, @code{.gmo}
+@cindex files @subentry @code{.gmo}
 @cindex message object files
-@cindex files, message object
+@cindex files @subentry message object
 @item
 Each language's @file{.po} file is converted into a binary
 message object (@file{.gmo}) file.
@@ -29667,15 +29766,16 @@ When @command{guide} is built and installed, the 
binary translation files
 are installed in a standard place.
 
 @cindex @code{bindtextdomain()} function (C library)
+@cindex C library functions @subentry @code{bindtextdomain()}
 @item
 For testing and development, it is possible to tell @command{gettext}
 to use @file{.gmo} files in a different directory than the standard
 one by using the @code{bindtextdomain()} function.
 
-@cindex @code{.gmo} files, specifying directory of
-@cindex files, @code{.gmo}, specifying directory of
-@cindex message object files, specifying directory of
-@cindex files, message object, specifying directory of
+@cindex @code{.gmo} files @subentry specifying directory of
+@cindex files @subentry @code{.gmo} @subentry specifying directory of
+@cindex message object files @subentry specifying directory of
+@cindex files @subentry message object @subentry specifying directory of
 @item
 At runtime, @command{guide} looks up each string via a call
 to @code{gettext()}.  The returned string is the translated string
@@ -29689,6 +29789,7 @@ and forth.
 @end enumerate
 
 @cindex @code{gettext()} function (C library)
+@cindex C library functions @subentry @code{gettext()}
 In C (or C++), the string marking and dynamic translation lookup
 are accomplished by wrapping each string in a call to @code{gettext()}:
 
@@ -29699,8 +29800,8 @@ printf("%s", gettext("Don't Panic!\n"));
 The tools that extract messages from source code pull out all
 strings enclosed in calls to @code{gettext()}.
 
-@cindex @code{_} (underscore), C macro
-@cindex underscore (@code{_}), C macro
+@cindex @code{_} (underscore) @subentry C macro
+@cindex underscore (@code{_}) @subentry C macro
 The GNU @command{gettext} developers, recognizing that typing
 @samp{gettext(@dots{})} over and over again is both painful and ugly to look
 at, use the macro @samp{_} (an underscore) to make things easier:
@@ -29713,8 +29814,8 @@ at, use the macro @samp{_} (an underscore) to make 
things easier:
 printf("%s", _("Don't Panic!\n"));
 @end example
 
-@cindex internationalization, localization, locale categories
-@cindex @command{gettext} library, locale categories
+@cindex internationalization @subentry localization @subentry locale categories
+@cindex @command{gettext} library @subentry locale categories
 @cindex locale categories
 @noindent
 This reduces the typing overhead to just three extra characters per string
@@ -29757,6 +29858,8 @@ such as @code{/[[:alnum:]]/}
 
 @cindex monetary information, localization
 @cindex currency symbols, localization
+@cindex internationalization @subentry localization @subentry monetary 
information
+@cindex internationalization @subentry localization @subentry currency symbols
 @cindex @code{LC_MONETARY} locale category
 @item LC_MONETARY
 Monetary information, such as the currency symbol, and whether the
@@ -29770,8 +29873,8 @@ use a comma every three decimal places and a period for 
the decimal
 point, while many Europeans do exactly the opposite:
 1,234.56 versus 1.234,56.}
 
-@cindex time, localization and
-@cindex dates, information related to@comma{} localization
+@cindex time @subentry localization and
+@cindex dates @subentry information related to, localization
 @cindex @code{LC_TIME} locale category
 @item LC_TIME
 Time- and date-related information, such as 12- or 24-hour clock, month printed
@@ -29784,6 +29887,7 @@ All of the above.  (Not too useful in the context of 
@command{gettext}.)
 
 @quotation NOTE
 @cindex @env{LANGUAGE} environment variable
+@cindex environment variables @subentry @env{LANGUAGE}
 As described in @ref{Locales}, environment variables with the same
 name as the locale categories (@env{LC_CTYPE}, @env{LC_ALL}, etc.)
 influence @command{gawk}'s behavior (and that of other utilities).
@@ -29797,6 +29901,8 @@ look to see if @env{LANGUAGE} is defined, and if so, 
use the shell's
 @command{unset} command to remove it.
 @end quotation
 
+@cindex @env{GAWK_LOCALE_DIR} environment variable
+@cindex environment variables @subentry @env{GAWK_LOCALE_DIR}
 For testing translations of @command{gawk} itself, you can set
 the @env{GAWK_LOCALE_DIR} environment variable. See the documentation
 for the C @code{bindtextdomain()} function and also see
@@ -29804,7 +29910,7 @@ for the C @code{bindtextdomain()} function and also see
 
 @node Programmer i18n
 @section Internationalizing @command{awk} Programs
-@cindex @command{awk} programs, internationalizing
+@cindex @command{awk} programs @subentry internationalizing
 
 @command{gawk} provides the following variables for
 internationalization:
@@ -29816,8 +29922,8 @@ This variable indicates the application's text domain.
 For compatibility with GNU @command{gettext}, the default
 value is @code{"messages"}.
 
-@cindex internationalization, localization, marked strings
-@cindex strings, for localization
+@cindex internationalization @subentry localization @subentry marked strings
+@cindex strings @subentry for localization
 @item _"your message here"
 String constants marked with a leading underscore
 are candidates for translation at runtime.
@@ -29866,10 +29972,10 @@ The default value for @var{category} is 
@code{"LC_MESSAGES"}.
 
 The same remarks about argument order as for the @code{dcgettext()} function 
apply.
 
-@cindex @code{.gmo} files, specifying directory of
-@cindex files, @code{.gmo}, specifying directory of
-@cindex message object files, specifying directory of
-@cindex files, message object, specifying directory of
+@cindex @code{.gmo} files @subentry specifying directory of
+@cindex files @subentry @code{.gmo} @subentry specifying directory of
+@cindex message object files @subentry specifying directory of
+@cindex files @subentry message object @subentry specifying directory of
 @cindexgawkfunc{bindtextdomain}
 @item @code{bindtextdomain(@var{directory}} [@code{,} @var{domain} ]@code{)}
 Change the directory in which
@@ -29887,8 +29993,8 @@ given @var{domain}.
 To use these facilities in your @command{awk} program, follow these steps:
 
 @enumerate
-@cindex @code{BEGIN} pattern, @code{TEXTDOMAIN} variable and
-@cindex @code{TEXTDOMAIN} variable, @code{BEGIN} pattern and
+@cindex @code{BEGIN} pattern @subentry @code{TEXTDOMAIN} variable and
+@cindex @code{TEXTDOMAIN} variable @subentry @code{BEGIN} pattern and
 @item
 Set the variable @code{TEXTDOMAIN} to the text domain of
 your program.  This is best done in a @code{BEGIN} rule
@@ -29903,8 +30009,8 @@ BEGIN @{
 @}
 @end example
 
-@cindex @code{_} (underscore), translatable string
-@cindex underscore (@code{_}), translatable string
+@cindex @code{_} (underscore) @subentry translatable strings
+@cindex underscore (@code{_}) @subentry translatable strings
 @item
 Mark all translatable strings with a leading underscore (@samp{_})
 character.  It @emph{must} be adjacent to the opening
@@ -29950,7 +30056,7 @@ printf(message, ncustomers)
 @end example
 
 
-@cindex @code{LC_MESSAGES} locale category, @code{bindtextdomain()} function 
(@command{gawk})
+@cindex @code{LC_MESSAGES} locale category @subentry @code{bindtextdomain()} 
function (@command{gawk})
 @item
 During development, you might want to put the @file{.gmo}
 file in a private directory for testing.  This is done
@@ -29979,9 +30085,9 @@ and use translations from @command{awk}.
 @section Translating @command{awk} Programs
 
 @cindex @code{.po} files
-@cindex files, @code{.po}
-@cindex portable object files
-@cindex files, portable object
+@cindex files @subentry @code{.po}
+@cindex portable object @subentry files
+@cindex files @subentry portable object
 Once a program's translatable strings have been marked, they must
 be extracted to create the initial @file{.pot} file.
 As part of translation, it is often helpful to rearrange the order
@@ -30001,10 +30107,10 @@ is covered.
 
 @node String Extraction
 @subsection Extracting Marked Strings
-@cindex strings, extracting
+@cindex strings @subentry extracting
 @cindex @option{--gen-pot} option
-@cindex command-line options, string extraction
-@cindex string extraction (internationalization)
+@cindex command line @subentry options @subentry string extraction
+@cindex string @subentry extraction (internationalization)
 @cindex marked string extraction (internationalization)
 @cindex extraction, of marked strings (internationalization)
 
@@ -30038,7 +30144,7 @@ translations for @command{guide}.
 @node Printf Ordering
 @subsection Rearranging @code{printf} Arguments
 
-@cindex @code{printf} statement, positional specifiers
+@cindex @code{printf} statement @subentry positional specifiers
 @cindex positional specifiers, @code{printf} statement
 Format strings for @code{printf} and @code{sprintf()}
 (@pxref{Printf})
@@ -30106,9 +30212,9 @@ comes first, then the integer position, and then the 
@samp{$}.
 This is somewhat counterintuitive.
 @end quotation
 
-@cindex @code{printf} statement, positional specifiers, mixing with regular 
formats
-@cindex positional specifiers, @code{printf} statement, mixing with regular 
formats
-@cindex format specifiers, mixing regular with positional specifiers
+@cindex @code{printf} statement @subentry positional specifiers @subentry 
mixing with regular formats
+@cindex positional specifiers, @code{printf} statement @subentry mixing with 
regular formats
+@cindex format specifiers @subentry mixing regular with positional specifiers
 @command{gawk} does not allow you to mix regular format specifiers
 and those with positional specifiers in the same string:
 
@@ -30134,8 +30240,8 @@ is first written.
 @node I18N Portability
 @subsection @command{awk} Portability Issues
 
-@cindex portability, internationalization and
-@cindex internationalization, localization, portability and
+@cindex portability @subentry internationalization and
+@cindex internationalization @subentry localization @subentry portability and
 @command{gawk}'s internationalization features were purposely chosen to
 have as little impact as possible on the portability of @command{awk}
 programs that use them to other versions of @command{awk}.
@@ -30156,7 +30262,7 @@ However, it is actually almost portable, requiring very 
little
 change:
 
 @itemize @value{BULLET}
-@cindex @code{TEXTDOMAIN} variable, portability and
+@cindex @code{TEXTDOMAIN} variable @subentry portability and
 @item
 Assignments to @code{TEXTDOMAIN} won't have any effect,
 because @code{TEXTDOMAIN} is not special in other @command{awk} 
implementations.
@@ -30175,9 +30281,9 @@ and @code{bindtextdomain()}, the @command{awk} program 
can be made to run, but
 all the messages are output in the original language.
 For example:
 
-@cindex @code{bindtextdomain()} function (@command{gawk}), portability and
-@cindex @code{dcgettext()} function (@command{gawk}), portability and
-@cindex @code{dcngettext()} function (@command{gawk}), portability and
+@cindex @code{bindtextdomain()} function (@command{gawk}) @subentry 
portability and
+@cindex @code{dcgettext()} function (@command{gawk}) @subentry portability and
+@cindex @code{dcngettext()} function (@command{gawk}) @subentry portability and
 @example
 @c file eg/lib/libintl.awk
 function bindtextdomain(dir, domain)
@@ -30291,7 +30397,6 @@ msgstr "Like, the scoop is"
 @c endfile
 @end example
 
-@cindex Linux
 @cindex GNU/Linux
 @quotation NOTE
 The following instructions apply to GNU/Linux with the GNU C Library. Be
@@ -30305,6 +30410,14 @@ file and then to create the @file{guide.mo} file.
 The directory has the form @file{@var{locale}/LC_MESSAGES}, where
 @var{locale} is a locale name known to the C @command{gettext} routines.
 
+@cindex @env{LANGUAGE} environment variable
+@cindex environment variables @subentry @env{LANGUAGE}
+@cindex @env{LC_ALL} environment variable
+@cindex environment variables @subentry @env{LC_ALL}
+@cindex @env{LANG} environment variable
+@cindex environment variables @subentry @env{LANG}
+@cindex @env{LC_MESSAGES} environment variable
+@cindex environment variables @subentry @env{LC_MESSAGES}
 How do we know which locale to use?  It turns out that there are
 four different environment variables used by the C @command{gettext} routines.
 In order, they are @env{$LANGUAGE}, @env{$LC_ALL}, @env{$LANG}, and
@@ -30324,14 +30437,14 @@ We next make the directories:
 $ @kbd{mkdir en_US.UTF-8 en_US.UTF-8/LC_MESSAGES}
 @end example
 
-@cindex @code{.po} files, converting to @code{.mo}
-@cindex files, @code{.po}, converting to @code{.mo}
+@cindex @code{.po} files @subentry converting to @code{.mo}
+@cindex files @subentry @code{.po} @subentry converting to @code{.mo}
 @cindex @code{.mo} files, converting from @code{.po}
-@cindex files, @code{.mo}, converting from @code{.po}
-@cindex portable object files, converting to message object files
-@cindex files, portable object, converting to message object files
-@cindex message object files, converting from portable object files
-@cindex files, message object, converting from portable object files
+@cindex files @subentry @code{.mo}, converting from @code{.po}
+@cindex portable object @subentry files @subentry converting to message object 
files
+@cindex files @subentry portable object @subentry converting to message object 
files
+@cindex message object files @subentry converting from portable object files
+@cindex files @subentry message object @subentry converting from portable 
object files
 @cindex @command{msgfmt} utility
 The @command{msgfmt} utility converts the human-readable
 @file{.po} file into a machine-readable @file{.mo} file.
@@ -30428,7 +30541,7 @@ a number of translations for its messages.
 
 @node Debugger
 @chapter Debugging @command{awk} Programs
-@cindex debugging @command{awk} programs
+@cindex debugging @subentry @command{awk} programs
 
 @c The original text for this chapter was contributed by Efraim Yawitz.
 
@@ -30476,7 +30589,7 @@ In that case, what can you expect from such a tool?  
The answer to that
 depends on the language being debugged, but in general, you can expect at
 least the following:
 
-@cindex debugger capabilities
+@cindex debugger @subentry capabilities
 @itemize @value{BULLET}
 @item
 The ability to watch a program execute its instructions one by one,
@@ -30509,14 +30622,14 @@ functional program that you or someone else wrote).
 @node Debugging Terms
 @subsection Debugging Concepts
 
-@cindex debugger, concepts
+@cindex debugger @subentry concepts
 Before diving in to the details, we need to introduce several
 important concepts that apply to just about all debuggers.
 The following list defines terms used throughout the rest of
 this @value{CHAPTER}:
 
 @table @dfn
-@cindex call stack (debugger)
+@cindex call stack @subentry explanation of
 @cindex stack frame (debugger)
 @item Stack frame
 Programs generally call functions during the course of their execution.
@@ -30539,7 +30652,7 @@ invoked. Commands that print the call stack print 
information about
 each stack frame (as detailed later on).
 
 @item Breakpoint
-@cindex breakpoint (debugger)
+@cindex breakpoint
 During debugging, you often wish to let the program run until it
 reaches a certain point, and then continue execution from there one
 statement (or instruction) at a time.  The way to do this is to set
@@ -30585,7 +30698,7 @@ does not work at the level of machine instructions.}
 @section Sample @command{gawk} Debugging Session
 @cindex sample debugging session
 @cindex example debugging session
-@cindex debugging, example session
+@cindex debugging @subentry example session
 
 In order to illustrate the use of @command{gawk} as a debugger, let's look at 
a sample
 debugging session.  We will use the @command{awk} implementation of the
@@ -30600,7 +30713,7 @@ as our example.
 @node Debugger Invocation
 @subsection How to Start the Debugger
 @cindex starting the debugger
-@cindex debugger, how to start
+@cindex debugger @subentry how to start
 
 Starting the debugger is almost exactly like running @command{gawk} normally,
 except you have to pass an additional option, @option{--debug}, or the
@@ -30623,7 +30736,7 @@ in the command line to the debugger rather than as part 
of the @code{run}
 command at the debugger prompt.)
 The @option{-1} is an option to @file{uniq.awk}.
 
-@cindex debugger, prompt
+@cindex debugger @subentry prompt
 Instead of immediately running the program on @file{inputfile}, as
 @command{gawk} would ordinarily do, the debugger merely loads all
 the program source files, compiles them internally, and then gives
@@ -30673,10 +30786,10 @@ a breakpoint in @file{uniq.awk} is at the beginning 
of the function
 @code{are_equal()}, which compares the current line with the previous one. To 
set
 the breakpoint, use the @code{b} (breakpoint) command:
 
-@cindex debugger, setting a breakpoint
-@cindex debugger, @code{breakpoint} command
-@cindex debugger, @code{break} command
-@cindex debugger, @code{b} command
+@cindex debugger @subentry setting a breakpoint
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{breakpoint}
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{break}
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{b} (@code{break})
 @example
 gawk> @kbd{b are_equal}
 @print{} Breakpoint 1 set at file `awklib/eg/prog/uniq.awk', line 63
@@ -30686,8 +30799,8 @@ The debugger tells us the file and line number where 
the breakpoint is.
 Now type @samp{r} or @samp{run} and the program runs until it hits
 the breakpoint for the first time:
 
-@cindex debugger, running the program
-@cindex debugger, @code{run} command
+@cindex debugger @subentry running the program
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{run}
 @example
 gawk> @kbd{r}
 @print{} Starting program:
@@ -30703,9 +30816,9 @@ let's see how we got to where we are.  At the prompt, 
we type @samp{bt}
 (short for ``backtrace''), and the debugger responds with a
 listing of the current stack frames:
 
-@cindex debugger, stack frames, showing
-@cindex debugger, @code{bt} command
-@cindex debugger, @code{backtrace} command
+@cindex debugger @subentry stack frames, showing
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{bt} (@code{backtrace})
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{backtrace}
 @example
 gawk> @kbd{bt}
 @print{} #0  are_equal(n, m, clast, cline, alast, aline)
@@ -30725,8 +30838,8 @@ of some variables.  Let's say we type @samp{p n}
 @code{n}, a parameter to @code{are_equal()}.  Actually, the debugger
 gives us:
 
-@cindex debugger, @code{print} command
-@cindex debugger, @code{p} command
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{print}
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{p} (@code{print})
 @example
 gawk> @kbd{p n}
 @print{} n = untyped variable
@@ -30777,8 +30890,8 @@ be inside this function.  To investigate further, we 
must begin
 ``stepping through'' the lines of @code{are_equal()}.  We start by typing
 @samp{n} (for ``next''):
 
-@cindex debugger, @code{n} command
-@cindex debugger, @code{next} command
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{n} (@code{next})
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{next}
 @example
 @group
 gawk> @kbd{n}
@@ -30824,7 +30937,7 @@ This information is useful enough (we now know that
 none of the words were accidentally left out), but what if we want to see
 inside the array?
 
-@cindex debugger, printing single array elements
+@cindex debugger @subentry printing single array elements
 The first choice would be to use subscripts:
 
 @example
@@ -30844,7 +30957,7 @@ This would be kind of slow for a 100-member array, 
though, so
 @command{gawk} provides a shortcut (reminiscent of another language
 not to be mentioned):
 
-@cindex debugger, printing all array elements
+@cindex debugger @subentry printing all array elements
 @example
 gawk> @kbd{p @@alast}
 @print{} alast["1"] = "awk"
@@ -30924,7 +31037,7 @@ Getting information
 Miscellaneous
 @end itemize
 
-@cindex debugger, repeating commands
+@cindex debugger @subentry repeating commands
 Each of these are discussed in the following subsections.
 In the following descriptions, commands that may be abbreviated
 show the abbreviation on a second description line.
@@ -30954,12 +31067,12 @@ will otherwise just run as if it was not under the 
debugger.  The commands for
 controlling breakpoints are:
 
 @table @asis
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{b} (@code{break})
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{break}
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{b} (@code{break})
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{break}
 @cindex @code{break} debugger command
 @cindex @code{b} debugger command (alias for @code{break})
 @cindex set breakpoint
-@cindex breakpoint, setting
+@cindex breakpoint @subentry setting
 @item @code{break} [[@var{filename}@code{:}]@var{n} | @var{function}] 
[@code{"@var{expression}"}]
 @itemx @code{b} [[@var{filename}@code{:}]@var{n} | @var{function}] 
[@code{"@var{expression}"}]
 Without any argument, set a breakpoint at the next instruction
@@ -30989,10 +31102,10 @@ evaluates whenever the breakpoint is reached. If the 
condition is true,
 then the debugger stops execution and prompts for a command. Otherwise,
 it continues executing the program.
 
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{clear}
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{clear}
 @cindex @code{clear} debugger command
-@cindex delete breakpoint, at location
-@cindex breakpoint at location, how to delete
+@cindex delete breakpoint @subentry at location
+@cindex breakpoint @subentry at location, how to delete
 @item @code{clear} [[@var{filename}@code{:}]@var{n} | @var{function}]
 Without any argument, delete any breakpoint at the next instruction
 to be executed in the selected stack frame. If the program stops at
@@ -31011,9 +31124,9 @@ Delete breakpoint(s) set at line number @var{n} in 
source file @var{filename}.
 Delete breakpoint(s) set at entry to function @var{function}.
 @end table
 
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{condition}
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{condition}
 @cindex @code{condition} debugger command
-@cindex breakpoint condition
+@cindex breakpoint @subentry condition
 @item @code{condition} @var{n} @code{"@var{expression}"}
 Add a condition to existing breakpoint or watchpoint @var{n}. The
 condition is an @command{awk} expression @emph{enclosed in double quotes}
@@ -31024,27 +31137,27 @@ the debugger continues executing the program. If the 
condition expression is
 not specified, any existing condition is removed (i.e., the breakpoint or
 watchpoint is made unconditional).
 
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{d} (@code{delete})
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{delete}
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{d} (@code{delete})
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{delete}
 @cindex @code{delete} debugger command
 @cindex @code{d} debugger command (alias for @code{delete})
-@cindex delete breakpoint, by number
-@cindex breakpoint, delete by number
+@cindex delete breakpoint @subentry by number
+@cindex breakpoint @subentry delete by number
 @item @code{delete} [@var{n1 n2} @dots{}] [@var{n}--@var{m}]
 @itemx @code{d} [@var{n1 n2} @dots{}] [@var{n}--@var{m}]
 Delete specified breakpoints or a range of breakpoints. Delete
 all defined breakpoints if no argument is supplied.
 
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{disable}
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{disable}
 @cindex @code{disable} debugger command
 @cindex disable breakpoint
-@cindex breakpoint, how to disable or enable
+@cindex breakpoint @subentry how to disable or enable
 @item @code{disable} [@var{n1 n2} @dots{} | @var{n}--@var{m}]
 Disable specified breakpoints or a range of breakpoints. Without
 any argument, disable all breakpoints.
 
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{e} (@code{enable})
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{enable}
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{e} (@code{enable})
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{enable}
 @cindex @code{enable} debugger command
 @cindex @code{e} debugger command (alias for @code{enable})
 @cindex enable breakpoint
@@ -31065,15 +31178,15 @@ Enable the breakpoints temporarily, then disable each 
one when
 the program stops at it.
 @end table
 
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{ignore}
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{ignore}
 @cindex @code{ignore} debugger command
 @cindex ignore breakpoint
 @item @code{ignore} @var{n} @var{count}
 Ignore breakpoint number @var{n} the next @var{count} times it is
 hit.
 
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{t} (@code{tbreak})
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{tbreak}
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{t} (@code{tbreak})
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{tbreak}
 @cindex @code{tbreak} debugger command
 @cindex @code{t} debugger command (alias for @code{tbreak})
 @cindex temporary breakpoint
@@ -31091,13 +31204,13 @@ and observing its behavior.  There are more commands 
for controlling
 execution of the program than we saw in our earlier example:
 
 @table @asis
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{commands}
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{commands}
 @cindex @code{commands} debugger command
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{silent}
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{silent}
 @cindex @code{silent} debugger command
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{end}
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{end}
 @cindex @code{end} debugger command
-@cindex breakpoint commands
+@cindex breakpoint @subentry commands to execute at
 @cindex commands to execute at breakpoint
 @item @code{commands} [@var{n}]
 @itemx @code{silent}
@@ -31124,8 +31237,8 @@ gawk> @kbd{commands}
 gawk>
 @end example
 
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{c} (@code{continue})
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{continue}
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{c} (@code{continue})
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{continue}
 @cindex continue program, in debugger
 @cindex @code{continue} debugger command
 @item @code{continue} [@var{count}]
@@ -31134,14 +31247,14 @@ Resume program execution. If continued from a 
breakpoint and @var{count} is
 specified, ignore the breakpoint at that location the next @var{count} times
 before stopping.
 
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{finish}
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{finish}
 @cindex @code{finish} debugger command
 @item @code{finish}
 Execute until the selected stack frame returns.
 Print the returned value.
 
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{n} (@code{next})
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{next}
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{n} (@code{next})
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{next}
 @cindex @code{next} debugger command
 @cindex @code{n} debugger command (alias for @code{next})
 @cindex single-step execution, in the debugger
@@ -31151,15 +31264,15 @@ Continue execution to the next source line, stepping 
over function calls.
 The argument @var{count} controls how many times to repeat the action, as
 in @code{step}.
 
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{ni} (@code{nexti})
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{nexti}
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{ni} (@code{nexti})
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{nexti}
 @cindex @code{nexti} debugger command
 @cindex @code{ni} debugger command (alias for @code{nexti})
 @item @code{nexti} [@var{count}]
 @itemx @code{ni} [@var{count}]
 Execute one (or @var{count}) instruction(s), stepping over function calls.
 
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{return}
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{return}
 @cindex @code{return} debugger command
 @item @code{return} [@var{value}]
 Cancel execution of a function call. If @var{value} (either a string or a
@@ -31168,8 +31281,8 @@ frame other than the innermost one (the currently 
executing function; i.e.,
 frame number 0), discard all inner frames in addition to the selected one,
 and the caller of that frame becomes the innermost frame.
 
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{r} (@code{run})
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{run}
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{r} (@code{run})
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{run}
 @cindex @code{run} debugger command
 @cindex @code{r} debugger command (alias for @code{run})
 @item @code{run}
@@ -31178,8 +31291,8 @@ Start/restart execution of the program. When 
restarting, the debugger
 retains the current breakpoints, watchpoints, command history,
 automatic display variables, and debugger options.
 
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{s} (@code{step})
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{step}
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{s} (@code{step})
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{step}
 @cindex @code{step} debugger command
 @cindex @code{s} debugger command (alias for @code{step})
 @item @code{step} [@var{count}]
@@ -31189,8 +31302,8 @@ current stack frame, stepping inside any function 
called within
 the line.  If the argument @var{count} is supplied, steps that many times 
before
 stopping, unless it encounters a breakpoint or watchpoint.
 
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{si} (@code{stepi})
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{stepi}
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{si} (@code{stepi})
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{stepi}
 @cindex @code{stepi} debugger command
 @cindex @code{si} debugger command (alias for @code{stepi})
 @item @code{stepi} [@var{count}]
@@ -31199,8 +31312,8 @@ Execute one (or @var{count}) instruction(s), stepping 
inside function calls.
 (For illustration of what is meant by an ``instruction'' in @command{gawk},
 see the output shown under @code{dump} in @ref{Miscellaneous Debugger 
Commands}.)
 
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{u} (@code{until})
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{until}
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{u} (@code{until})
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{until}
 @cindex @code{until} debugger command
 @cindex @code{u} debugger command (alias for @code{until})
 @item @code{until} [[@var{filename}@code{:}]@var{n} | @var{function}]
@@ -31217,7 +31330,7 @@ stack frame returns.
 The commands for viewing and changing variables inside of @command{gawk} are:
 
 @table @asis
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{display}
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{display}
 @cindex @code{display} debugger command
 @item @code{display} [@var{var} | @code{$}@var{n}]
 Add variable @var{var} (or field @code{$@var{n}}) to the display list.
@@ -31237,7 +31350,7 @@ no such variable of the given name exists.
 Without argument, @code{display} displays the current values of
 items on the list.
 
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{eval}
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{eval}
 @cindex @code{eval} debugger command
 @cindex evaluate expressions, in debugger
 @item @code{eval "@var{awk statements}"}
@@ -31264,8 +31377,8 @@ This form of @code{eval} is similar, but it allows you 
to define
 @var{awk statements}, instead of using variables or function
 parameters defined by the program.
 
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{p} (@code{print})
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{print}
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{p} (@code{print})
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{print}
 @cindex @code{print} debugger command
 @cindex @code{p} debugger command (alias for @code{print})
 @cindex print variables, in debugger
@@ -31292,7 +31405,7 @@ gawk> @kbd{print @@a}
 This prints the indices and the corresponding values for all elements in
 the array @code{a}.
 
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{printf}
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{printf}
 @cindex @code{printf} debugger command
 @item @code{printf} @var{format} [@code{,} @var{arg} @dots{}]
 Print formatted text. The @var{format} may include escape sequences,
@@ -31300,7 +31413,7 @@ such as @samp{\n}
 (@pxref{Escape Sequences}).
 No newline is printed unless one is specified.
 
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{set}
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{set}
 @cindex @code{set} debugger command
 @cindex assign values to variables, in debugger
 @item @code{set} @var{var}@code{=}@var{value}
@@ -31311,8 +31424,8 @@ String values must be enclosed between double quotes 
(@code{"}@dots{}@code{"}).
 You can also set special @command{awk} variables, such as @code{FS},
 @code{NF}, @code{NR}, and so on.
 
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{w} (@code{watch})
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{watch}
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{w} (@code{watch})
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{watch}
 @cindex @code{watch} debugger command
 @cindex @code{w} debugger command (alias for @code{watch})
 @cindex set watchpoint
@@ -31330,14 +31443,14 @@ evaluates whenever the watchpoint is reached. If the 
condition is true,
 then the debugger stops execution and prompts for a command. Otherwise,
 @command{gawk} continues executing the program.
 
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{undisplay}
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{undisplay}
 @cindex @code{undisplay} debugger command
 @cindex stop automatic display, in debugger
 @item @code{undisplay} [@var{n}]
 Remove item number @var{n} (or all items, if no argument) from the
 automatic display list.
 
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{unwatch}
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{unwatch}
 @cindex @code{unwatch} debugger command
 @cindex delete watchpoint
 @item @code{unwatch} [@var{n}]
@@ -31356,13 +31469,13 @@ and also move around in the stack to see what the 
state of things was in the
 functions that called the one you are in.  The commands for doing this are:
 
 @table @asis
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{bt} (@code{backtrace})
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{backtrace}
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{where} (@code{backtrace})
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{bt} (@code{backtrace})
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{backtrace}
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{where} (@code{backtrace})
 @cindex @code{backtrace} debugger command
 @cindex @code{bt} debugger command (alias for @code{backtrace})
 @cindex @code{where} debugger command (alias for @code{backtrace})
-@cindex call stack, display in debugger
+@cindex call stack @subentry display in debugger
 @cindex traceback, display in debugger
 @item @code{backtrace} [@var{count}]
 @itemx @code{bt} [@var{count}]
@@ -31374,14 +31487,14 @@ function, the source @value{FN}, and the line number.
 The alias @code{where} for @code{backtrace} is provided for longtime
 GDB users who may be used to that command.
 
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{down}
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{down}
 @cindex @code{down} debugger command
 @item @code{down} [@var{count}]
 Move @var{count} (default 1) frames down the stack toward the innermost frame.
 Then select and print the frame.
 
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{f} (@code{frame})
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{frame}
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{f} (@code{frame})
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{frame}
 @cindex @code{frame} debugger command
 @cindex @code{f} debugger command (alias for @code{frame})
 @item @code{frame} [@var{n}]
@@ -31392,7 +31505,7 @@ called the innermost one. The highest-numbered frame is 
the one for the
 main program.  The printed information consists of the frame number,
 function and argument names, source file, and the source line.
 
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{up}
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{up}
 @cindex @code{up} debugger command
 @item @code{up} [@var{count}]
 Move @var{count} (default 1) frames up the stack toward the outermost frame.
@@ -31410,8 +31523,8 @@ is used with one of a number of arguments that tell it 
exactly what
 you want to know:
 
 @table @asis
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{i} (@code{info})
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{info}
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{i} (@code{info})
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{info}
 @cindex @code{info} debugger command
 @cindex @code{i} debugger command (alias for @code{info})
 @item @code{info} @var{what}
@@ -31421,11 +31534,13 @@ The value for @var{what} should be one of the 
following:
 @c nested table
 @table @code
 @item args
-@cindex show function arguments, in debugger
+@cindex show in debugger @subentry function arguments
+@cindex function arguments, show in debugger
 List arguments of the selected frame.
 
 @item break
-@cindex show breakpoints
+@cindex show in debugger @subentry breakpoints
+@cindex breakpoint @subentry show all in debugger
 List all currently set breakpoints.
 
 @item display
@@ -31438,15 +31553,19 @@ Give a description of the selected stack frame.
 
 @item functions
 @cindex list function definitions, in debugger
+@cindex function definitions, list in debugger
 List all function definitions including source @value{FN}s and
 line numbers.
 
 @item locals
-@cindex show local variables, in debugger
+@cindex show in debugger @subentry local variables
+@cindex local variables @subentry show in debugger
 List local variables of the selected frame.
 
 @item source
-@cindex show name of current source file, in debugger
+@cindex show in debugger @subentry name of current source file
+@cindex current source file, show in debugger
+@cindex source file, show in debugger
 Print the name of the current source file. Each time the program stops, the
 current source file is the file containing the current instruction.
 When the debugger first starts, the current source file is the first file
@@ -31455,15 +31574,18 @@ included via the @option{-f} option. The
 be used at any time to change the current source.
 
 @item sources
-@cindex show all source files, in debugger
+@cindex show in debugger @subentry all source files
+@cindex all source files, show in debugger
 List all program sources.
 
 @item variables
 @cindex list all global variables, in debugger
+@cindex global variables, show in debugger
 List all global variables.
 
 @item watch
-@cindex show watchpoints
+@cindex show in debugger @subentry watchpoints
+@cindex watchpoints, show in debugger
 List all items in the watch list.
 @end table
 @end table
@@ -31473,12 +31595,12 @@ save the debugger's state, and the ability to run 
debugger commands
 from a file.  The commands are:
 
 @table @asis
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{o} (@code{option})
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{option}
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{o} (@code{option})
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{option}
 @cindex @code{option} debugger command
 @cindex @code{o} debugger command (alias for @code{option})
 @cindex display debugger options
-@cindex debugger, options
+@cindex debugger @subentry options
 @item @code{option} [@var{name}[@code{=}@var{value}]]
 @itemx @code{o} [@var{name}[@code{=}@var{value}]]
 Without an argument, display the available debugger options
@@ -31491,12 +31613,12 @@ The available options are:
 @c asis for docbook
 @table @asis
 @item @code{history_size}
-@cindex debugger, history size
+@cindex debugger @subentry history size
 Set the maximum number of lines to keep in the history file
 @file{./.gawk_history}.  The default is 100.
 
 @item @code{listsize}
-@cindex debugger, default list amount
+@cindex debugger @subentry default list amount
 Specify the number of lines that @code{list} prints. The default is 15.
 
 @item @code{outfile}
@@ -31506,11 +31628,11 @@ to standard output. An empty string (@code{""}) 
resets output to
 standard output.
 
 @item @code{prompt}
-@cindex debugger, prompt
+@cindex debugger @subentry prompt
 Change the debugger prompt. The default is @samp{@w{gawk> }}.
 
 @item @code{save_history} [@code{on} | @code{off}]
-@cindex debugger, history file
+@cindex debugger @subentry history file
 Save command history to file @file{./.gawk_history}.
 The default is @code{on}.
 
@@ -31522,17 +31644,17 @@ Options are read back into the next session upon 
startup.
 
 @item @code{trace} [@code{on} | @code{off}]
 @cindex instruction tracing, in debugger
-@cindex debugger, instruction tracing
+@cindex debugger @subentry instruction tracing
 Turn instruction tracing on or off. The default is @code{off}.
 @end table
 
-@cindex debugger, save commands to a file
+@cindex debugger @subentry save commands to a file
 @item @code{save} @var{filename}
 Save the commands from the current session to the given @value{FN},
 so that they can be replayed using the @command{source} command.
 
 @item @code{source} @var{filename}
-@cindex debugger, read commands from a file
+@cindex debugger @subentry read commands from a file
 Run command(s) from a file; an error in any command does not
 terminate execution of subsequent commands. Comments (lines starting
 with @samp{#}) are allowed in a command file.
@@ -31556,7 +31678,7 @@ There are a few more commands that do not fit into the
 previous categories, as follows:
 
 @table @asis
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{dump}
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{dump}
 @cindex @code{dump} debugger command
 @item @code{dump} [@var{filename}]
 Dump byte code of the program to standard output or to the file
@@ -31626,8 +31748,8 @@ gawk>
 Exit the debugger.
 See the entry for @samp{quit}, later in this list.
 
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{h} (@code{help})
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{help}
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{h} (@code{help})
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{help}
 @cindex @code{help} debugger command
 @cindex @code{h} debugger command (alias for @code{help})
 @item @code{help}
@@ -31636,8 +31758,8 @@ Print a list of all of the @command{gawk} debugger 
commands with a short
 summary of their usage.  @samp{help @var{command}} prints the information
 about the command @var{command}.
 
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{l} (@code{list})
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{list}
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{l} (@code{list})
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{list}
 @cindex @code{list} debugger command
 @cindex @code{l} debugger command (alias for @code{list})
 @item @code{list} [@code{-} | @code{+} | @var{n} | 
@var{filename}@code{:}@var{n} | @var{n}--@var{m} | @var{function}]
@@ -31670,8 +31792,8 @@ Print lines centered around the beginning of the
 function @var{function}. This command may change the current source file.
 @end table
 
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{q} (@code{quit})
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{quit}
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{q} (@code{quit})
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{quit}
 @cindex @code{quit} debugger command
 @cindex @code{q} debugger command (alias for @code{quit})
 @cindex exit the debugger
@@ -31683,7 +31805,7 @@ and are free to go on to the next one!  As we saw 
earlier, if you are
 running a program, the debugger warns you when you type
 @samp{q} or @samp{quit}, to make sure you really want to quit.
 
-@cindex debugger commands, @code{trace}
+@cindex debugger @subentry commands @subentry @code{trace}
 @cindex @code{trace} debugger command
 @item @code{trace} [@code{on} | @code{off}]
 Turn on or off continuous printing of the instructions that are about to
@@ -31699,9 +31821,9 @@ fairly self-explanatory, and using @code{stepi} and 
@code{nexti} while
 @node Readline Support
 @section Readline Support
 @cindex command completion, in debugger
-@cindex debugger, command completion
+@cindex debugger @subentry command completion
 @cindex history expansion, in debugger
-@cindex debugger, history expansion
+@cindex debugger @subentry history expansion
 
 If @command{gawk} is compiled with
 @uref{http://cnswww.cns.cwru.edu/php/chet/readline/readline.html,
@@ -31740,7 +31862,7 @@ and
 @node Limitations
 @section Limitations
 
-@cindex debugger, limitations
+@cindex debugger @subentry limitations
 We hope you find the @command{gawk} debugger useful and enjoyable to work with,
 but as with any program, especially in its early releases, it still has
 some limitations.  A few that it's worth being aware of are:
@@ -31932,8 +32054,8 @@ please report them (@xref{Bugs}).
 @node Global Namespace
 @section Standard @command{awk}'s Single Namespace
 
-@cindex namespace, definition of
-@cindex namespace, standard @command{awk}, global
+@cindex namespace @subentry definition of
+@cindex namespace @subentry standard @command{awk}, global
 In standard @command{awk}, there is a single, global, @dfn{namespace}.
 This means that @emph{all} function names and global variable names must
 be unique. For example, two different @command{awk} source files cannot
@@ -31963,9 +32085,10 @@ simple mechanism to put functions and global variables 
into separate namespaces.
 @node Qualified Names
 @section Qualified Names
 
-@cindex qualified name, definition of
-@cindex namespaces, qualified names
-@cindex @code{::}, namespace separator
+@cindex qualified name @subentry definition of
+@cindex namespaces @subentry qualified names
+@cindex @code{:} (colon) @subentry @code{::} namespace separator
+@cindex colon (@code{:}) @subentry @code{::} namespace separator
 @cindex component name
 A @dfn{qualified name} is an identifier that includes a namespace name,
 the namespace separator @code{::}, and a @dfn{component} name.  For example, 
one
@@ -31979,7 +32102,7 @@ Unlike C++, the @code{::} is @emph{not} an operator.  
No spaces are
 allowed between the namespace name, the @code{::}, and the component name.
 @end quotation
 
-@cindex qualified name, use of
+@cindex qualified name @subentry use of
 You must use qualified names from one namespace to access variables
 and functions in another.  This is especially important when using
 variable names to index the special @code{SYMTAB} array (@pxref{Auto-set}),
@@ -31988,9 +32111,9 @@ and when making indirect function calls 
(@pxref{Indirect Calls}).
 @node Default Namespace
 @section The Default Namespace
 
-@cindex namespace, default
-@cindex namespace, @code{awk}
-@cindex @code{awk} namespace
+@cindex namespace @subentry default
+@cindex namespace @subentry @code{awk}
+@cindex @code{awk} @subentry namespace
 The default namespace, not surprisingly, is @code{awk}.
 All of the predefined @command{awk} and @command{gawk} variables
 are in this namespace, and thus have qualified names like
@@ -32007,8 +32130,10 @@ It also keeps your code looking natural.
 @node Changing The Namespace
 @section Changing The Namespace
 
-@cindex namespaces, changing
-@cindex @code{@@namespace} directive
+@cindex namespaces @subentry changing
+@cindex @code{@@} (at-sign) @subentry @code{@@namespace} directive
+@cindex at-sign (@code{@@}) @subentry @code{@@namespace} directive
+@cindex @code{@@namespace} directive @sortas{namespace directive}
 In order to set the current namespace, use an @code{@@namespace} directive
 at the top level of your program:
 
@@ -32033,7 +32158,7 @@ no concept of a ``current'' namespace once your program 
starts executing.
 Be sure you understand this.
 @end quotation
 
-@cindex namespace, implicit
+@cindex namespace @subentry implicit
 @cindex implicit namespace
 Each source file for @option{-i} and @option{-f} starts out with
 an implicit @samp{@@namespace "awk"}.  Similarly, each chunk of
@@ -32041,7 +32166,7 @@ command-line code supplied with @option{-e} has such an 
implicit
 initial statement (@pxref{Options}).
 
 @cindex current namespace, pushing and popping
-@cindex namespace, pushing and popping
+@cindex namespace @subentry pushing and popping
 Files included with @code{@@include} (@pxref{Include Files}) ``push''
 and ``pop'' the current namespace. That is, each @code{@@include} saves
 the current namespace and starts over with an implicit @samp{@@namespace
@@ -32050,20 +32175,23 @@ directive is seen.  When @command{gawk} finishes 
processing the included
 file, the saved namespace is restored and processing continues where it
 left off in the original file.
 
-@cindex @code{@@namespace}, no effect on @code{BEGIN}@comma{} 
@code{BEGINFILE}@comma{} @code{END}@comma{} and @code{ENDFILE}
-@cindex @code{BEGIN} pattern, execution order not affected by 
@code{@@namespace}
-@cindex @code{BEGINFILE} pattern, execution order not affected by 
@code{@@namespace}
-@cindex @code{END} pattern, execution order not affected by @code{@@namespace}
-@cindex @code{ENDFILE} pattern, execution order not affected by 
@code{@@namespace}
+@cindex @code{@@} (at-sign) @subentry @code{@@namespace} directive @subentry 
@code{BEGIN}, @code{BEGINFILE}, @code{END}, @code{ENDFILE} and
+@cindex at-sign (@code{@@}) @subentry @code{@@namespace} directive @subentry 
@code{BEGIN}, @code{BEGINFILE}, @code{END}, @code{ENDFILE} and
+@cindex @code{BEGIN} pattern @subentry @code{@@namespace} directive and
+@cindex @code{BEGINFILE} pattern @subentry @code{@@namespace} directive and
+@cindex @code{END} pattern @subentry @code{@@namespace} directive and
+@cindex @code{ENDFILE} pattern @subentry @code{@@namespace} directive and
+@cindex @code{@@namespace} directive @sortas{namespace directive}
 The use of @code{@@namespace} has no influence upon the order of execution
 of @code{BEGIN}, @code{BEGINFILE}, @code{END}, and @code{ENDFILE} rules.
 
 @node Naming Rules
 @section Namespace and Component Naming Rules
 
-@cindex naming rules, namespaces and component names
-@cindex namespace names, naming rules
-@cindex component names, naming rules
+@cindex naming rules, namespace and component names
+@cindex namespaces @subentry naming rules
+@c not "component names" to merge with other index entry
+@cindex component name @subentry naming rules
 A number of rules apply to the namespace and component names, as follows.
 
 @itemize @bullet
@@ -32130,8 +32258,8 @@ $ @kbd{gawk -f systime.awk}
 @section Internal Name Management
 
 @cindex name management
-@cindex @code{awk} namespace, identifier name storage
-@cindex @code{awk} namespace, use for indirect function calls
+@cindex @code{awk} @subentry namespace @subentry identifier name storage
+@cindex @code{awk} @subentry namespace @subentry use for indirect function 
calls
 For backwards compatibility, all identifiers in the @code{awk} namespace
 are stored internally as unadorned identifiers (that is, without a
 leading @samp{awk::}).  This is mainly relevant
@@ -32162,7 +32290,7 @@ function compute()        @ii{This is really} 
report::compute()
 @node Namespace Example
 @section Namespace Example
 
-@cindex namespace, example code
+@cindex namespace @subentry example code
 The following example is a revised version of the suite of routines
 developed in @ref{Passwd Functions}. See there for an explanation
 of how the code works.
@@ -32288,8 +32416,8 @@ $ @kbd{gawk -f ns_passwd.awk -f testpasswd.awk}
 This @value{SECTION} looks briefly at how the namespace facility interacts
 with other important @command{gawk} features.
 
-@cindex namespaces, interaction with profiler
-@cindex namespaces, interaction with pretty printer
+@cindex namespaces @subentry interaction with @subentry profiler
+@cindex namespaces @subentry interaction with @subentry pretty printer
 @cindex profiler, interaction with namespaces
 @cindex pretty printer, interaction with namespaces
 The profiler and pretty-printer (@pxref{Profiling}) have been enhanced
@@ -32299,15 +32427,15 @@ namespace together, and has @code{@@namespace} 
directives in front
 of rules as necessary. This allows component names to be
 simple identifiers, instead of using qualified identifiers everywhere.
 
-@cindex namespaces, interaction with debugger
-@cindex debugger, interaction with namespaces
+@cindex namespaces @subentry interaction with @subentry debugger
+@cindex debugger @subentry interaction with namespaces
 Interaction with the debugger (@pxref{Debugging}) has not had to change
 (at least as of this writing).  Some of the internal byte codes changed
 in order to accommodate namespaces, and the debugger's @code{dump} command
 was adjusted to match.
 
-@cindex namespaces, interaction with extension API
-@cindex extension API interaction with namespaces
+@cindex namespaces @subentry interaction with @subentry extension API
+@cindex extension API @subentry interaction with namespaces
 The extension API (@pxref{Dynamic Extensions}) has always allowed for
 placing functions into a different namespace, although this was not
 previously implemented.  However, the symbol lookup and symbol update
@@ -32344,7 +32472,7 @@ namespaces smoothly with their operation.  This applies 
most notably to
 the profiler / pretty-printer (@pxref{Profiling}) and to the extension
 facility (@pxref{Dynamic Extensions}).
 
-@cindex namespaces, backwards compatibility
+@cindex namespaces @subentry backwards compatibility
 @item
 Overall, the namespace facility was designed and implemented such that
 backwards compatibility is paramount. Programs that don't use namespaces
@@ -32357,7 +32485,7 @@ version of @command{gawk}.
 @cindex arbitrary precision
 @cindex multiple precision
 @cindex infinite precision
-@cindex floating-point, numbers@comma{} arbitrary-precision
+@cindex floating-point @subentry numbers @subentry arbitrary-precision
 
 This @value{CHAPTER} introduces some basic concepts relating to
 how computers do arithmetic and defines some important terms.
@@ -32426,7 +32554,7 @@ The advantage to integer numbers is that they represent 
values exactly.
 The disadvantage is that their range is limited.
 
 @cindex unsigned integers
-@cindex integers, unsigned
+@cindex integers @subentry unsigned
 In computers, integer values come in two flavors: @dfn{signed} and
 @dfn{unsigned}.  Signed values may be negative or positive, whereas
 unsigned values are always greater than or equal
@@ -32436,7 +32564,7 @@ In computer systems, integer arithmetic is exact, but 
the possible
 range of values is limited.  Integer arithmetic is generally faster than
 floating-point arithmetic.
 
-@cindex floating-point, numbers
+@cindex floating-point @subentry numbers
 @item Floating-point arithmetic
 Floating-point numbers represent what were called in school ``real''
 numbers (i.e., those that have a fractional part, such as 3.1415927).
@@ -32448,9 +32576,9 @@ Modern systems support floating-point arithmetic in 
hardware, with a
 limited range of values.  There are software libraries that allow
 the use of arbitrary-precision floating-point calculations.
 
-@cindex floating-point, numbers@comma{} single-precision
-@cindex floating-point, numbers@comma{} double-precision
-@cindex floating-point, numbers@comma{} arbitrary-precision
+@cindex floating-point @subentry numbers @subentry single-precision
+@cindex floating-point @subentry numbers @subentry double-precision
+@cindex floating-point @subentry numbers @subentry arbitrary-precision
 @cindex single-precision
 @cindex double-precision
 @cindex arbitrary precision
@@ -33074,7 +33202,7 @@ cause any accumulating round-off error to cancel itself 
out. This is the
 default rounding mode for IEEE 754 computing functions and operators.
 
 @c January 2018. Thanks to address@hidden for the example.
-@cindex sidebar, Rounding Modes and Conversion
+@cindex sidebar @subentry Rounding Modes and Conversion
 @ifdocbook
 @docbook
 <sidebar><title>Rounding Modes and Conversion</title>
@@ -33159,8 +33287,8 @@ output when you change the rounding mode to be sure.
 
 @node Arbitrary Precision Integers
 @section Arbitrary-Precision Integer Arithmetic with @command{gawk}
-@cindex integers, arbitrary precision
-@cindex arbitrary precision integers
+@cindex integers @subentry arbitrary precision
+@cindex arbitrary precision @subentry integers
 
 When given the @option{-M} option,
 @command{gawk} performs all integer arithmetic using GMP arbitrary-precision
@@ -33392,7 +33520,6 @@ word sizes. See
 @node Checking for MPFR
 @section How To Check If MPFR Is Available
 
-@cindex MPFR, checking availability of
 @cindex checking for MPFR
 @cindex MPFR, checking for
 Occasionally, you might like to be able to check if @command{gawk}
@@ -33546,6 +33673,7 @@ $ @kbd{echo 0xDeadBeef | gawk '@{ print $1 + 0 @}'}
 Thus, @samp{+nan} and @samp{+NaN} are the same.
 @end itemize
 
+@cindex POSIX mode
 Besides handling input, @command{gawk} also needs to print ``correct'' values 
on
 output when a value is either NaN or infinity. Starting with @value{PVERSION}
 4.2.2, for such values @command{gawk} prints one of the four strings
@@ -34041,7 +34169,7 @@ the macros as if they were functions.
 @node General Data Types
 @subsection General-Purpose Data Types
 
-@cindex Robbins, Arnold
+@cindex Robbins @subentry Arnold
 @cindex Ramey, Chet
 @quotation
 @i{I have a true love/hate relationship with unions.}
@@ -34251,7 +34379,7 @@ process and reduces the time needed to create the value.
 @node Memory Allocation Functions
 @subsection Memory Allocation Functions and Convenience Macros
 @cindex allocating memory for extensions
-@cindex extensions, allocating memory
+@cindex extensions @subentry loadable @subentry allocating memory
 @cindex memory, allocating for extensions
 
 The API provides a number of @dfn{memory allocation} functions for
@@ -34444,8 +34572,8 @@ to be a @samp{char *} value pointing to data previously 
obtained from
 
 @node Registration Functions
 @subsection Registration Functions
-@cindex register extension
-@cindex extension registration
+@cindex register loadable extension
+@cindex extensions @subentry loadable @subentry registration
 
 This @value{SECTION} describes the API functions for
 registering parts of your extension with @command{gawk}.
@@ -35124,7 +35252,7 @@ Register the two-way processor pointed to by 
@code{two_way_processor} with
 
 @node Printing Messages
 @subsection Printing Messages
-@cindex printing messages from extensions
+@cindex printing @subentry messages from extensions
 @cindex messages from extensions
 
 You can print different kinds of warning messages from your
@@ -35673,7 +35801,7 @@ you should release any cached values that you created, 
using
 @node Array Manipulation
 @subsection Array Manipulation
 @cindex array manipulation in extensions
-@cindex extensions, array manipulation in
+@cindex extensions @subentry loadable @subentry array manipulation in
 
 The primary data structure@footnote{OK, the only data structure.} in 
@command{awk}
 is the associative array (@pxref{Arrays}).
@@ -36349,8 +36477,8 @@ information about how @command{gawk} was invoked.
 
 @node Extension Versioning
 @subsubsection API Version Constants and Variables
-@cindex API version
-@cindex extension API version
+@cindex API @subentry version
+@cindex extension API @subentry version number
 
 The API provides both a ``major'' and a ``minor'' version number.
 The API versions are available at compile time as C preprocessor defines
@@ -36450,8 +36578,8 @@ calls @code{check_mpfr_version()}.
 
 @node Extension API Informational Variables
 @subsubsection Informational Variables
-@cindex API informational variables
-@cindex extension API informational variables
+@cindex API @subentry informational variables
+@cindex extension API @subentry informational variables
 
 The API provides access to several variables that describe
 whether the corresponding command-line options were enabled when
@@ -36663,7 +36791,7 @@ The @code{get_file()} API is new
 
 @node Finding Extensions
 @section How @command{gawk} Finds Extensions
-@cindex extension search path
+@cindex extensions @subentry loadable @subentry search path
 @cindex finding extensions
 
 Compiled extensions have to be installed in a directory where
@@ -36675,7 +36803,7 @@ path with a list of directories to search for compiled 
extensions.
 
 @node Extension Example
 @section Example: Some File Functions
-@cindex extension example
+@cindex extensions @subentry loadable @subentry example
 
 @quotation
 @i{No matter where you go, there you are.}
@@ -36889,7 +37017,7 @@ static const char *ext_version = "filefuncs extension: 
version 1.0";
 int plugin_is_GPL_compatible;
 @end example
 
-@cindex programming conventions, @command{gawk} extensions
+@cindex programming conventions @subentry @command{gawk} extensions
 By convention, for an @command{awk} function @code{foo()}, the C function
 that implements it is called @code{do_foo()}.  The function should have
 two arguments. The first is an @code{int}, usually called @code{nargs},
@@ -37231,7 +37359,7 @@ And that's it!
 @node Using Internal File Ops
 @subsection Integrating the Extensions
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, interpreter@comma{} adding code to
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry interpreter, adding code to
 Now that the code is written, it must be possible to add it at
 runtime to the running @command{gawk} interpreter.  First, the
 code must be compiled.  Assuming that the functions are in
@@ -37313,7 +37441,7 @@ $ @kbd{AWKLIBPATH=$PWD gawk -f testff.awk}
 
 @node Extension Samples
 @section The Sample Extensions in the @command{gawk} Distribution
-@cindex extensions distributed with @command{gawk}
+@cindex extensions @subentry loadable @subentry distributed with @command{gawk}
 
 This @value{SECTION} provides a brief overview of the sample extensions
 that come in the @command{gawk} distribution. Some of them are intended
@@ -38023,8 +38151,7 @@ for more information.
 
 @node gawkextlib
 @section The @code{gawkextlib} Project
-@cindex @code{gawkextlib}
-@cindex extensions, where to find
+@cindex extensions @subentry loadable @subentry @code{gawkextlib} project
 
 @cindex @code{gawkextlib} project
 The @uref{https://sourceforge.net/projects/gawkextlib/, @code{gawkextlib}}
@@ -38344,8 +38471,8 @@ online documentation}.
 
 @node V7/SVR3.1
 @appendixsec Major Changes Between V7 and SVR3.1
-@cindex @command{awk}, versions of
-@cindex @command{awk}, versions of, changes between V7 and SVR3.1
+@cindex @command{awk} @subentry versions of
+@cindex @command{awk} @subentry versions of @subentry changes between V7 and 
SVR3.1
 
 The @command{awk} language evolved considerably between the release of
 Version 7 Unix (1978) and the new version that was first made generally 
available in
@@ -38435,7 +38562,7 @@ Multidimensional arrays
 @node SVR4
 @appendixsec Changes Between SVR3.1 and SVR4
 
-@cindex @command{awk}, versions of, changes between SVR3.1 and SVR4
+@cindex @command{awk} @subentry versions of @subentry changes between SVR3.1 
and SVR4
 The System V Release 4 (1989) version of Unix @command{awk} added these 
features
 (some of which originated in @command{gawk}):
 
@@ -38493,8 +38620,8 @@ Processing of escape sequences inside command-line 
variable assignments
 
 @node POSIX
 @appendixsec Changes Between SVR4 and POSIX @command{awk}
-@cindex @command{awk}, versions of, changes between SVR4 and POSIX 
@command{awk}
-@cindex POSIX @command{awk}, changes in @command{awk} versions
+@cindex @command{awk} @subentry versions of @subentry changes between SVR4 and 
POSIX @command{awk}
+@cindex POSIX @command{awk} @subentry changes in @command{awk} versions
 
 The POSIX Command Language and Utilities standard for @command{awk} (1992)
 introduced the following changes into the language:
@@ -38549,9 +38676,9 @@ The 2008 POSIX standard can be found online at
 @node BTL
 @appendixsec Extensions in Brian Kernighan's @command{awk}
 
-@cindex @command{awk}, versions of, See Also Brian Kernighan's @command{awk}
-@cindex extensions, Brian Kernighan's @command{awk}
-@cindex Brian Kernighan's @command{awk}, extensions
+@cindex @command{awk} @subentry versions of @seealso{Brian Kernighan's 
@command{awk}}
+@cindex extensions @subentry Brian Kernighan's @command{awk}
+@cindex Brian Kernighan's @command{awk} @subentry extensions
 @cindex Kernighan, Brian
 Brian Kernighan
 has made his version available via his home page
@@ -38590,9 +38717,9 @@ available in his @command{awk}.
 @node POSIX/GNU
 @appendixsec Extensions in @command{gawk} Not in POSIX @command{awk}
 
-@cindex compatibility mode (@command{gawk}), extensions
-@cindex extensions, in @command{gawk}, not in POSIX @command{awk}
-@cindex POSIX, @command{gawk} extensions not included in
+@cindex compatibility mode (@command{gawk}) @subentry extensions
+@cindex extensions @subentry in @command{gawk}, not in POSIX @command{awk}
+@cindex POSIX @subentry @command{gawk} extensions not included in
 The GNU implementation, @command{gawk}, adds a large number of features.
 They can all be disabled with either the @option{--traditional} or
 @option{--posix} options
@@ -39430,6 +39557,7 @@ a global symbol indicating that they are GPL-compatible
 (@pxref{Plugin License}).
 
 @item
+@cindex POSIX mode
 In POSIX mode, string comparisons use @code{strcoll()} / @code{wcscoll()}
 (@pxref{POSIX String Comparison}).
 
@@ -39688,8 +39816,8 @@ unfortunately.
 @node Common Extensions
 @appendixsec Common Extensions Summary
 
-@cindex extensions, Brian Kernighan's @command{awk}
-@cindex extensions, @command{mawk}
+@cindex extensions @subentry Brian Kernighan's @command{awk}
+@cindex extensions @subentry @command{mawk}
 The following table summarizes the common extensions supported
 by @command{gawk}, Brian Kernighan's @command{awk}, and @command{mawk},
 the three most widely used freely available versions of @command{awk}
@@ -39720,6 +39848,8 @@ This @value{SECTION} describes the confusing history of 
ranges within
 regular expressions and their interactions with locales, and how this
 affected different versions of @command{gawk}.
 
+@cindex ASCII
+@cindex EBCDIC
 The original Unix tools that worked with regular expressions defined
 character ranges (such as @samp{[a-z]}) to match any character between
 the first character in the range and the last character in the range,
@@ -39777,6 +39907,7 @@ This result is due to the locale setting (and thus you 
may not see
 it on your system).
 
 @cindex Unicode
+@cindex ASCII
 Similar considerations apply to other ranges.  For example, @samp{["-/]}
 is perfectly valid in ASCII, but is not valid in many Unicode locales,
 such as @code{en_US.UTF-8}.
@@ -39819,7 +39950,7 @@ In all cases @command{gawk} remains POSIX-compliant.
 
 @node Contributors
 @appendixsec Major Contributors to @command{gawk}
-@cindex @command{gawk}, list of contributors to
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry list of contributors to
 @quotation
 @i{Always give credit where credit is due.}
 @author Anonymous
@@ -40006,7 +40137,7 @@ of IBM in Japan, contributed support for multibyte 
characters.
 Michael Benzinger contributed the initial code for @code{switch} statements.
 
 @item
-@cindex McPhee, Patrick
+@cindex McPhee, Patrick T.J.@:
 Patrick T.J.@: McPhee contributed the code for dynamic loading in Windows32
 environments.
 (This is no longer supported.)
@@ -40088,7 +40219,7 @@ distribution.
 Juan Manuel Guerrero took over maintenance of the DJGPP port.
 
 @item
-@cindex Robbins, Arnold
+@cindex Robbins @subentry Arnold
 Arnold Robbins
 has been working on @command{gawk} since 1988, at first
 helping David Trueman, and as the primary maintainer since around 1994.
@@ -40116,6 +40247,8 @@ They can be disabled with either the 
@option{--traditional} or @option{--posix}
 options.
 
 @item
+@cindex ASCII
+@cindex EBCDIC
 The interaction of POSIX locales and regexp matching in @command{gawk} has 
been confusing over
 the years. Today, @command{gawk} implements Rational Range Interpretation, 
where
 ranges of the form @samp{[a-z]} match @emph{only} the characters numerically 
between
@@ -40133,8 +40266,11 @@ the appropriate credit where credit is due.
 @appendix Installing @command{gawk}
 
 @c last two commas are part of see also
-@cindex operating systems, See Also GNU/Linux@comma{} PC operating 
systems@comma{} Unix
-@cindex @command{gawk}, installing
+@cindex operating systems
+@cindex operating systems @seealso{GNU/Linux}
+@cindex operating systems @seealso{PC operating systems}
+@cindex operating systems @seealso{Unix}
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry installing
 @cindex installing @command{gawk}
 This appendix provides instructions for installing @command{gawk} on the
 various platforms that are supported by the developers.  The primary
@@ -40157,7 +40293,7 @@ the respective ports.
 
 @node Gawk Distribution
 @appendixsec The @command{gawk} Distribution
-@cindex source code, @command{gawk}
+@cindex source code @subentry @command{gawk}
 
 This @value{SECTION} describes how to get the @command{gawk}
 distribution, how to extract it, and then what is in the various files and
@@ -40171,7 +40307,7 @@ subdirectories.
 
 @node Getting
 @appendixsubsec Getting the @command{gawk} Distribution
-@cindex @command{gawk}, source code@comma{} obtaining
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry source code, obtaining
 There are two ways to get GNU software:
 
 @itemize @value{BULLET}
@@ -40247,7 +40383,7 @@ a local expert.
 
 @node Distribution contents
 @appendixsubsec Contents of the @command{gawk} Distribution
-@cindex @command{gawk}, distribution
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry distribution
 
 The @command{gawk} distribution has a number of C source files,
 documentation files,
@@ -40303,7 +40439,7 @@ A description of behaviors in the POSIX standard for 
@command{awk} that
 are left undefined, or where @command{gawk} may not comply fully, as well
 as a list of things that the POSIX standard should describe but does not.
 
-@cindex artificial intelligence@comma{} @command{gawk} and
+@cindex artificial intelligence, @command{gawk} and
 @item doc/awkforai.txt
 Pointers to the original draft of
 a short article describing why @command{gawk} is a good language for
@@ -40555,26 +40691,32 @@ on other platforms, the appropriate location may be 
different.
 @table @command
 
 @cindex @command{gawkpath_default} shell function
+@cindex shell function @subentry @command{gawkpath_default}
 @item gawkpath_default
 Reset the @env{AWKPATH} environment variable to its default value.
 
 @cindex @command{gawkpath_prepend} shell function
+@cindex shell function @subentry @command{gawkpath_prepend}
 @item gawkpath_prepend
 Add the argument to the front of the @env{AWKPATH} environment variable.
 
 @cindex @command{gawkpath_append} shell function
+@cindex shell function @subentry @command{gawkpath_append}
 @item gawkpath_append
 Add the argument to the end of the @env{AWKPATH} environment variable.
 
 @cindex @command{gawklibpath_default} shell function
+@cindex shell function @subentry @command{gawklibpath_default}
 @item gawklibpath_default
 Reset the @env{AWKLIBPATH} environment variable to its default value.
 
 @cindex @command{gawklibpath_prepend} shell function
+@cindex shell function @subentry @command{gawklibpath_prepend}
 @item gawklibpath_prepend
 Add the argument to the front of the @env{AWKLIBPATH} environment variable.
 
 @cindex @command{gawklibpath_append} shell function
+@cindex shell function @subentry @command{gawklibpath_append}
 @item gawklibpath_append
 Add the argument to the end of the @env{AWKLIBPATH} environment variable.
 
@@ -40583,8 +40725,8 @@ Add the argument to the end of the @env{AWKLIBPATH} 
environment variable.
 
 @node Additional Configuration Options
 @appendixsubsec Additional Configuration Options
-@cindex @command{gawk}, configuring, options
-@cindex configuration options@comma{} @command{gawk}
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry configuring @subentry options
+@cindex configuration options, @command{gawk}
 
 There are several additional options you may use on the @command{configure}
 command line when compiling @command{gawk} from scratch, including:
@@ -40592,7 +40734,7 @@ command line when compiling @command{gawk} from 
scratch, including:
 @table @code
 
 @cindex @option{--disable-extensions} configuration option
-@cindex configuration option, @code{--disable-extensions}
+@cindex configuration option @subentry @code{--disable-extensions}
 @item --disable-extensions
 Disable the extension mechanism within @command{gawk}. With this
 option, it is not possible to use dynamic extensions.  This also
@@ -40604,7 +40746,7 @@ The default action is to dynamically check if the 
extensions
 can be configured and compiled.
 
 @cindex @option{--disable-lint} configuration option
-@cindex configuration option, @code{--disable-lint}
+@cindex configuration option @subentry @code{--disable-lint}
 @item --disable-lint
 Disable all lint checking within @command{gawk}.  The
 @option{--lint} and @option{--lint-old} options
@@ -40627,21 +40769,21 @@ to fail.  This option may be removed at a later date.
 @end quotation
 
 @cindex @option{--disable-mpfr} configuration option
-@cindex configuration option, @code{--disable-mpfr}
+@cindex configuration option @subentry @code{--disable-mpfr}
 @item --disable-mpfr
 Skip checking for the MPFR and GMP libraries. This is useful
 mainly for the developers, to make sure nothing breaks if
 MPFR support is not available.
 
 @cindex @option{--disable-nls} configuration option
-@cindex configuration option, @code{--disable-nls}
+@cindex configuration option @subentry @code{--disable-nls}
 @item --disable-nls
 Disable all message-translation facilities.
 This is usually not desirable, but it may bring you some slight performance
 improvement.
 
 @cindex @option{--enable-versioned-extension-dir} configuration option
-@cindex configuration option, @code{--enable-versioned-extension-dir}
+@cindex configuration option @subentry @code{--enable-versioned-extension-dir}
 @item --enable-versioned-extension-dir
 Use a versioned directory for extensions.  The directory name will
 include the major and minor API versions in it. This makes it possible
@@ -40656,7 +40798,7 @@ options supplied by @command{configure}.
 @node Configuration Philosophy
 @appendixsubsec The Configuration Process
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, configuring
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry configuring
 This @value{SECTION} is of interest only if you know something about using the
 C language and Unix-like operating systems.
 
@@ -40717,8 +40859,8 @@ various non-Unix systems.
 @node PC Installation
 @appendixsubsec Installation on MS-Windows
 
-@cindex PC operating systems@comma{} @command{gawk} on, installing
-@cindex operating systems, PC@comma{} @command{gawk} on, installing
+@cindex PC operating systems, @command{gawk} on @subentry installing
+@cindex operating systems @subentry PC, @command{gawk} on @subentry installing
 This @value{SECTION} covers installation and usage of @command{gawk}
 on Intel architecture machines running any version of MS-Windows.
 In this @value{SECTION}, the term ``Windows32''
@@ -40737,6 +40879,7 @@ See also the @file{README_d/README.pc} file in the 
distribution.
 
 @node PC Binary Installation
 @appendixsubsubsec Installing a Prepared Distribution for MS-Windows Systems
+@cindex installing @command{gawk} @subentry MS-Windows
 
 The only supported binary distribution for MS-Windows systems
 is that provided by Eli Zaretskii's 
@uref{https://sourceforge.net/projects/ezwinports/,
@@ -40750,7 +40893,7 @@ The file @file{README_d/README.pc} in the 
@command{gawk} distribution
 contains additional notes, and @file{pc/Makefile} contains important
 information on compilation options.
 
-@cindex compiling @command{gawk} for MS-Windows
+@cindex compiling @command{gawk} @subentry for MS-Windows
 To build @command{gawk} for Windows32, copy the files in
 the @file{pc} directory (@emph{except} for @file{ChangeLog}) to the
 directory with the rest of the @command{gawk} sources, then invoke
@@ -40767,7 +40910,7 @@ type @samp{make mingw32}.
 
 @node PC Using
 @appendixsubsubsec Using @command{gawk} on PC Operating Systems
-@cindex operating systems, PC, @command{gawk} on
+@cindex operating systems @subentry PC, @command{gawk} on
 @cindex PC operating systems, @command{gawk} on
 
 Information in this section applies to the MinGW and
@@ -40780,20 +40923,21 @@ both the @samp{|&} operator and TCP/IP networking
 The DJGPP environment does not support @samp{|&}.
 
 @cindex search paths
-@cindex search paths, for source files
-@cindex @command{gawk}, MS-Windows version of
-@cindex @code{;} (semicolon), @env{AWKPATH} variable and
-@cindex semicolon (@code{;}), @env{AWKPATH} variable and
+@cindex search paths @subentry for source files
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry MS-Windows version of
+@cindex @code{;} (semicolon) @subentry @env{AWKPATH} variable and
+@cindex semicolon (@code{;}) @subentry @env{AWKPATH} variable and
 @cindex @env{AWKPATH} environment variable
+@cindex environment variables @subentry @env{AWKPATH}
 The MS-Windows version of @command{gawk} searches for
 program files as described in @ref{AWKPATH Variable}.  However,
 semicolons (rather than colons) separate elements in the @env{AWKPATH}
 variable.  If @env{AWKPATH} is not set or is empty, then the default
 search path is @samp{@w{.;c:/lib/awk;c:/gnu/lib/awk}}.
 
-@cindex common extensions, @code{BINMODE} variable
-@cindex extensions, common@comma{} @code{BINMODE} variable
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, @code{BINMODE} 
variable
+@cindex common extensions @subentry @code{BINMODE} variable
+@cindex extensions @subentry common @subentry @code{BINMODE} variable
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry 
@code{BINMODE} variable
 @cindex @code{BINMODE} variable
 Under MS-Windows,
 @command{gawk} (and many other text programs) silently
@@ -40889,7 +41033,7 @@ moved into the @code{BEGIN} rule.
 
 @node Cygwin
 @appendixsubsubsec Using @command{gawk} In The Cygwin Environment
-@cindex compiling @command{gawk} for Cygwin
+@cindex compiling @command{gawk} @subentry for Cygwin
 
 @command{gawk} can be built and used ``out of the box'' under MS-Windows
 if you are using the @uref{http://www.cygwin.com, Cygwin environment}.
@@ -40909,6 +41053,10 @@ When compared to GNU/Linux on the same system, the 
@samp{configure}
 step on Cygwin takes considerably longer.  However, it does finish,
 and then the @samp{make} proceeds as usual.
 
+@cindex installing @command{gawk} @subentry Cygwin
+You may also install @command{gawk} using the regular Cygwin installer.
+In general Cygwin supplies the latest released version.
+
 Recent versions of Cygwin open all files in binary mode. This means
 that you should use @samp{RS = "\r?\n"} in order to be able to
 handle standard MS-Windows text files with carriage-return plus
@@ -40936,8 +41084,8 @@ translation of @code{"\r\n"}, because it won't.
 @c now address@hidden
 @c now address@hidden
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, VMS version of
-@cindex installation, VMS
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry VMS version of
+@cindex installing @command{gawk} @subentry VMS
 This @value{SUBSECTION} describes how to compile and install @command{gawk} 
under VMS.
 The older designation ``VMS'' is used throughout to refer to OpenVMS.
 
@@ -40953,7 +41101,7 @@ The older designation ``VMS'' is used throughout to 
refer to OpenVMS.
 
 @node VMS Compilation
 @appendixsubsubsec Compiling @command{gawk} on VMS
-@cindex compiling @command{gawk} for VMS
+@cindex compiling @command{gawk} @subentry for VMS
 
 To compile @command{gawk} under VMS, there is a @code{DCL} command procedure
 that issues all the necessary @code{CC} and @code{LINK} commands. There is
@@ -41151,7 +41299,7 @@ flag is required to force Unix-style parsing rather 
than @code{DCL} parsing.
 If any other dash-type options (or multiple parameters such as @value{DF}s to
 process) are present, there is no ambiguity and @option{--} can be omitted.
 
-@cindex exit status, of @command{gawk}, on VMS
+@cindex exit status, of @command{gawk} @subentry on VMS
 The @code{exit} value is a Unix-style value and is encoded into a VMS exit
 status value when the program exits.
 
@@ -41177,7 +41325,7 @@ Older versions of @command{gawk} for VMS treated a Unix 
exit code 0 as 1,
 a failure as 2, a fatal error as 4, and passed all the other numbers through.
 This violated the VMS exit status coding requirements.
 
-@cindex floating-point, VAX/VMS
+@cindex floating-point @subentry numbers @subentry VAX/VMS
 VAX/VMS floating point uses unbiased rounding. @xref{Round Function}.
 
 VMS reports time values in GMT unless one of the @code{SYS$TIMEZONE_RULE}
@@ -41187,7 +41335,7 @@ or @code{TZ} logical names is set.  Older versions of 
VMS, such as VAX/VMS
 @c @cindex directory search
 @c @cindex path, search
 @cindex search paths
-@cindex search paths, for source files
+@cindex search paths @subentry for source files
 The default search path, when looking for @command{awk} program files specified
 by the @option{-f} option, is @code{"SYS$DISK:[],AWK_LIBRARY:"}.  The logical
 name @env{AWKPATH} can be used to override this default.  The format
@@ -41195,7 +41343,7 @@ of @env{AWKPATH} is a comma-separated list of directory 
specifications.
 When defining it, the value should be quoted so that it retains a single
 translation and not a multitranslation @code{RMS} searchlist.
 
-@cindex redirection on VMS
+@cindex redirection @subentry on VMS
 
 This restriction also applies to running @command{gawk} under GNV,
 as redirection is always to a DCL command.
@@ -41316,7 +41464,7 @@ recommend compiling and using the current version.
 @c the radio show, not the book. :-)
 
 @cindex debugging @command{gawk}, bug reports
-@cindex troubleshooting, @command{gawk}, bug reports
+@cindex troubleshooting @subentry @command{gawk} @subentry bug reports
 If you have problems with @command{gawk} or think that you have found a bug,
 report it to the developers; we cannot promise to do anything,
 but we might well want to fix it.
@@ -41450,7 +41598,7 @@ The people maintaining the various @command{gawk} ports 
are:
 @cindex Malmberg, John
 @cindex Pitts, Dave
 @cindex G., Daniel Richard
-@cindex Robbins, Arnold
+@cindex Robbins @subentry Arnold
 @cindex Zaretskii, Eli
 @cindex Guerrero, Juan Manuel
 @multitable {MS-Windows with MinGW} 
{123456789012345678901234567890123456789001234567890}
@@ -41475,7 +41623,7 @@ report to the @EMAIL{bug-gawk@@gnu.org,bug-gawk at gnu 
dot org} email list as we
 
 @node Other Versions
 @appendixsec Other Freely Available @command{awk} Implementations
-@cindex @command{awk}, implementations
+@cindex @command{awk} @subentry implementations
 @ignore
 From: emory!amc.com!brennan (Michael Brennan)
 Subject: C++ comments in awk programs
@@ -41504,9 +41652,9 @@ This @value{SECTION} briefly describes where to get 
them:
 
 @table @asis
 @cindex Kernighan, Brian
-@cindex source code, Brian Kernighan's @command{awk}
-@cindex @command{awk}, versions of, See Also Brian Kernighan's @command{awk}
-@cindex Brian Kernighan's @command{awk}, source code
+@cindex source code @subentry Brian Kernighan's @command{awk}
+@cindex @command{awk} @subentry versions of @seealso{Brian Kernighan's 
@command{awk}}
+@cindex Brian Kernighan's @command{awk} @subentry source code
 @item Unix @command{awk}
 Brian Kernighan, one of the original designers of Unix @command{awk},
 has made his implementation of
@@ -41540,7 +41688,7 @@ available at 
@uref{git://github.com/danfuzz/one-true-awk}.
 
 @cindex Brennan, Michael
 @cindex @command{mawk} utility
-@cindex source code, @command{mawk}
+@cindex source code @subentry @command{mawk}
 @item @command{mawk}
 Michael Brennan wrote an independent implementation of @command{awk},
 called @command{mawk}.  It is available under the
@@ -41577,7 +41725,7 @@ His development snapshots are available via Git from 
the project's
 
 @cindex Sumner, Andrew
 @cindex @command{awka} compiler for @command{awk}
-@cindex source code, @command{awka}
+@cindex source code @subentry @command{awka}
 @item @command{awka}
 Written by Andrew Sumner,
 @command{awka} translates @command{awk} programs into C, compiles them,
@@ -41597,7 +41745,7 @@ since approximately 2001.
 
 @cindex Beebe, Nelson H.F.@:
 @cindex @command{pawk} (profiling version of Brian Kernighan's @command{awk})
-@cindex source code, @command{pawk}
+@cindex source code @subentry @command{pawk} (profiling version of Brian 
Kernighan's @command{awk})
 @item @command{pawk}
 Nelson H.F.@: Beebe at the University of Utah has modified
 BWK @command{awk} to provide timing and profiling information.
@@ -41611,7 +41759,7 @@ or
 
 @item BusyBox @command{awk}
 @cindex BusyBox Awk
-@cindex source code, BusyBox Awk
+@cindex source code @subentry BusyBox Awk
 BusyBox is a GPL-licensed program providing small versions of many
 applications within a single executable. It is aimed at embedded systems.
 It includes a full implementation of POSIX @command{awk}.  When building
@@ -41621,7 +41769,7 @@ information, see the @uref{https://busybox.net, 
project's home page}.
 
 @cindex OpenSolaris
 @cindex Solaris, POSIX-compliant @command{awk}
-@cindex source code, Solaris @command{awk}
+@cindex source code @subentry Solaris @command{awk}
 @item The OpenSolaris POSIX @command{awk}
 The versions of @command{awk} in @file{/usr/xpg4/bin} and
 @file{/usr/xpg6/bin} on Solaris are more or less POSIX-compliant.
@@ -41631,9 +41779,8 @@ with 1--2 hours of work.  Making it more generally 
portable (using
 GNU Autoconf and/or Automake) would take more work, and this
 has not been done, at least to our knowledge.
 
-@cindex Illumos
 @cindex Illumos, POSIX-compliant @command{awk}
-@cindex source code, Illumos @command{awk}
+@cindex source code @subentry Illumos @command{awk}
 The source code used to be available from the OpenSolaris website.
 However, that project was ended and the website shut down.  Fortunately, the
 @uref{https://wiki.illumos.org/display/illumos/illumos+Home, Illumos project}
@@ -41642,8 +41789,8 @@ makes this implementation available.  You can view the 
files one at a time from
 
 @cindex @command{goawk}
 @cindex Go implementation of @command{awk}
-@cindex source code, @command{goawk}
-@cindex programming languages, Go
+@cindex source code @subentry @command{goawk}
+@cindex programming languages @subentry Go
 @item @command{goawk}
 This is an @command{awk} interpreter written in the
 @uref{https://golang.org/, Go programming language}.
@@ -41655,7 +41802,7 @@ describing the implementation.
 
 @cindex @command{jawk}
 @cindex Java implementation of @command{awk}
-@cindex source code, @command{jawk}
+@cindex source code @subentry @command{jawk}
 @item @command{jawk}
 This is an interpreter for @command{awk} written in Java. It claims
 to be a full interpreter, although because it uses Java facilities
@@ -41665,12 +41812,12 @@ from POSIX @command{awk}.  More information is 
available on the
 
 @item Libmawk
 @cindex libmawk
-@cindex source code, libmawk
+@cindex source code @subentry libmawk
 This is an embeddable @command{awk} interpreter derived from
 @command{mawk}. For more information, see
 @uref{http://repo.hu/projects/libmawk/}.
 
-@cindex source code, embeddable @command{awk} interpreter
+@cindex source code @subentry embeddable @command{awk} interpreter
 @cindex Neacsu, Mircea
 @item Mircea Neacsu's Embeddable @command{awk}
 Mircea Neacsu has created an embeddable @command{awk}
@@ -41678,7 +41825,7 @@ interpreter, based on BWK awk. It's available
 at @uref{https://github.com/neacsum/awk}.
 
 @item @code{pawk}
-@cindex source code, @command{pawk} (Python version)
+@cindex source code @subentry @command{pawk} (Python version)
 @cindex @code{pawk}, @command{awk}-like facilities for Python
 This is a Python module that claims to bring @command{awk}-like
 features to Python. See @uref{https://github.com/alecthomas/pawk}
@@ -41687,13 +41834,13 @@ modified version of BWK @command{awk}, described 
earlier.)
 
 @item @w{QSE @command{awk}}
 @cindex QSE @command{awk}
-@cindex source code, QSE @command{awk}
+@cindex source code @subentry QSE @command{awk}
 This is an embeddable @command{awk} interpreter. For more information,
 see @uref{https://code.google.com/p/qse/}. @c and 
@uref{http://awk.info/?tools/qse}.
 
 @item @command{QTawk}
 @cindex QuikTrim Awk
-@cindex source code, QuikTrim Awk
+@cindex source code @subentry QuikTrim Awk
 This is an independent implementation of @command{awk} distributed
 under the GPL. It has a large number of extensions over standard
 @command{awk} and may not be 100% syntactically compatible with it.
@@ -41757,7 +41904,7 @@ implementations.  Many are POSIX-compliant; others are 
less so.
 @ifclear FOR_PRINT
 @node Notes
 @appendix Implementation Notes
-@cindex @command{gawk}, implementation issues
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry implementation issues
 @cindex implementation issues, @command{gawk}
 
 This appendix contains information mainly of interest to implementers and
@@ -41776,10 +41923,10 @@ maintainers of @command{gawk}.  Everything in it 
applies specifically to
 
 @node Compatibility Mode
 @appendixsec Downward Compatibility and Debugging
-@cindex @command{gawk}, implementation issues, downward compatibility
-@cindex @command{gawk}, implementation issues, debugging
-@cindex troubleshooting, @command{gawk}
-@cindex implementation issues@comma{} @command{gawk}, debugging
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry implementation issues @subentry downward 
compatibility
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry implementation issues @subentry debugging
+@cindex troubleshooting @subentry @command{gawk}
+@cindex implementation issues, @command{gawk} @subentry debugging
 
 @xref{POSIX/GNU},
 for a summary of the GNU extensions to the @command{awk} language and program.
@@ -41861,9 +42008,9 @@ that has a Git plug-in for working with Git 
repositories.
 @node Adding Code
 @appendixsubsec Adding New Features
 
-@cindex adding, features to @command{gawk}
-@cindex features, adding to @command{gawk}
-@cindex @command{gawk}, features, adding
+@cindex adding @subentry features to @command{gawk}
+@cindex features @subentry adding to @command{gawk}
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry features @subentry adding
 You are free to add any new features you like to @command{gawk}.
 However, if you want your changes to be incorporated into the @command{gawk}
 distribution, there are several steps that you need to take in order to
@@ -41909,7 +42056,7 @@ the GNU Project's
 @uref{https://www.gnu.org/prep/standards/, website}.
 Texinfo, Info, and DVI versions are also available.)
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, coding style in
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry coding style in
 @item
 Use the @command{gawk} coding style.
 The C code for @command{gawk} follows the instructions in the
@@ -42035,8 +42182,8 @@ probably will not.
 
 @node New Ports
 @appendixsubsec Porting @command{gawk} to a New Operating System
-@cindex portability, @command{gawk}
-@cindex operating systems, porting @command{gawk} to
+@cindex portability @subentry @command{gawk}
+@cindex operating systems @subentry porting @command{gawk} to
 
 @cindex porting @command{gawk}
 If you want to port @command{gawk} to a new operating system, there are
@@ -42385,7 +42532,7 @@ Larry
 @end ignore
 @cindex Perl
 @cindex Wall, Larry
-@cindex Robbins, Arnold
+@cindex Robbins @subentry Arnold
 @quotation
 @i{AWK is a language similar to PERL, only considerably more elegant.}
 @author Arnold Robbins
@@ -42693,8 +42840,8 @@ removed from the code base with the 4.2 release.
 
 @node Basic Concepts
 @appendix Basic Programming Concepts
-@cindex programming, concepts
-@cindex programming, concepts
+@cindex programming @subentry concepts
+@cindex programming @subentry concepts
 
 This @value{APPENDIX} attempts to define some of the basic concepts
 and terms that are used throughout the rest of this @value{DOCUMENT}.
@@ -42750,7 +42897,7 @@ or it may be @dfn{interpreted}.  In the latter case, a 
machine-executable
 program such as @command{awk} reads your program, and then uses the
 instructions in your program to process the data.
 
-@cindex programming, basic steps
+@cindex programming @subentry basic steps
 When you write a program, it usually consists
 of the following, very basic set of steps,
 @ifnotdocbook
@@ -42835,7 +42982,7 @@ and even more often, as ``I/O'' for short.
 (You will also see ``input'' and ``output'' used as verbs.)
 
 @cindex data-driven languages
-@cindex languages@comma{} data-driven
+@cindex languages, data-driven
 @command{awk} manages the reading of data for you, as well as the
 breaking it up into records and fields.  Your program's job is to
 tell @command{awk} what to do with the data.  You do this by describing
@@ -42858,8 +43005,8 @@ and the fields of the record.
 You may also group multiple
 associated values under one name, as an array.
 
-@cindex values, numeric
-@cindex values, string
+@cindex values @subentry numeric
+@cindex values @subentry string
 @cindex scalar values
 Data, particularly in @command{awk}, consists of either numeric
 values, such as 42 or 3.1415927, or string values.
@@ -42943,7 +43090,7 @@ rule's action.  Actions are always enclosed in braces.
 (@xref{Action Overview}.)
 
 @cindex Ada programming language
-@cindex programming languages, Ada
+@cindex programming languages @subentry Ada
 @item Ada
 A programming language originally defined by the U.S.@: Department of
 Defense for embedded programming. It was designed to enforce good
@@ -42952,6 +43099,7 @@ Software Engineering practices.
 @cindex Spencer, Henry
 @cindex @command{sed} utility
 @cindex amazing @command{awk} assembler (@command{aaa})
+@cindex @command{aaa} (amazing @command{awk} assembler) program
 @item Amazing @command{awk} Assembler
 Henry Spencer at the University of Toronto wrote a retargetable assembler
 completely as @command{sed} and @command{awk} scripts.  It is thousands
@@ -43178,8 +43326,8 @@ See ``Bracket Expression.''
 See ``Bracket Expression.''
 
 @cindex ASCII
-@cindex ISO 8859-1
-@cindex ISO Latin-1
+@cindex ISO @subentry ISO 8859-1 character set
+@cindex ISO @subentry ISO Latin-1 character set
 @cindex character sets (machine character encodings)
 @cindex Unicode
 @item Character Set
@@ -43367,6 +43515,7 @@ The epoch on Unix and POSIX systems is 1970-01-01 
00:00:00 UTC.
 See also ``GMT'' and ``UTC.''
 
 @item Escape Sequences
+@cindex ASCII
 A special sequence of characters used for describing nonprinting
 characters, such as @samp{\n} for newline or @samp{\033} for the ASCII
 ESC (Escape) character. (@xref{Escape Sequences}.)
@@ -43450,8 +43599,6 @@ The @command{gawk} extension API provides constructor 
functions
 The GNU implementation of @command{awk}.
 
 @cindex GPL (General Public License)
-@cindex General Public License (GPL)
-@cindex GNU General Public License
 @item General Public License
 This document describes the terms under which @command{gawk} and its source
 code may be distributed. (@xref{Copying}.)
@@ -43538,7 +43685,7 @@ information about the name of the organization and its 
language-independent
 three-letter acronym.
 
 @cindex Java programming language
-@cindex programming languages, Java
+@cindex programming languages @subentry Java
 @item Java
 A modern programming language originally developed by Sun Microsystems
 (now Oracle) supporting Object-Oriented programming.  Although usually
@@ -43845,7 +43992,6 @@ and POSIX systems.  Used for the @command{gawk} 
functions
 @code{mktime()}, @code{strftime()}, and @code{systime()}.
 See also ``Epoch,'' ``GMT,'' and ``UTC.''
 
-@cindex Linux
 @cindex GNU/Linux
 @cindex Unix
 @cindex BSD-based operating systems
diff --git a/doc/gawktexi.in b/doc/gawktexi.in
index 03f58c3..d378b02 100644
--- a/doc/gawktexi.in
+++ b/doc/gawktexi.in
@@ -54,7 +54,7 @@
 @c applies to and all the info about who's publishing this edition
 
 @c These apply across the board.
-@set UPDATE-MONTH July, 2019
+@set UPDATE-MONTH September, 2019
 @set VERSION 5.1
 @set PATCHLEVEL 0
 
@@ -1312,6 +1312,7 @@ October 2014
    </prefaceinfo>
 @end docbook
 
+@cindex @command{awk}
 Several kinds of tasks occur repeatedly when working with text files.
 You might want to extract certain lines and discard the rest.  Or you
 may need to make changes wherever certain patterns appear, but leave the
@@ -1319,6 +1320,7 @@ rest of the file alone.  Such jobs are often easy with 
@command{awk}.
 The @command{awk} utility interprets a special-purpose programming
 language that makes it easy to handle simple data-reformatting jobs.
 
+@cindex @command{gawk}
 The GNU implementation of @command{awk} is called @command{gawk}; if you
 invoke it with the proper options or environment variables,
 it is fully compatible with
@@ -1332,12 +1334,12 @@ properly written @command{awk} programs should work 
with @command{gawk}.
 So most of the time, we don't distinguish between @command{gawk} and other
 @command{awk} implementations.
 
-@cindex @command{awk}, POSIX and, See Also POSIX @command{awk}
-@cindex @command{awk}, POSIX and
-@cindex POSIX, @command{awk} and
-@cindex @command{gawk}, @command{awk} and
-@cindex @command{awk}, @command{gawk} and
-@cindex @command{awk}, uses for
+@cindex @command{awk} @subentry POSIX and @seealso{POSIX @command{awk}}
+@cindex @command{awk} @subentry POSIX and
+@cindex POSIX @subentry @command{awk} and
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry @command{awk} and
+@cindex @command{awk} @subentry @command{gawk} and
+@cindex @command{awk} @subentry uses for
 Using @command{awk} you can:
 
 @itemize @value{BULLET}
@@ -1358,9 +1360,9 @@ Experiment with algorithms that you can adapt later to 
other computer
 languages
 @end itemize
 
-@cindex @command{awk}, See Also @command{gawk}
-@cindex @command{gawk}, See Also @command{awk}
-@cindex @command{gawk}, uses for
+@cindex @command{awk} @seealso{@command{gawk}}
+@cindex @command{gawk} @seealso{@command{awk}}
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry uses for
 In addition,
 @command{gawk}
 provides facilities that make it easy to:
@@ -1390,7 +1392,7 @@ Unix-based systems. If you are using some other operating 
system, you still need
 be familiar with the ideas of I/O redirection and pipes.} as well as basic 
shell
 facilities, such as input/output (I/O) redirection and pipes.
 
-@cindex GNU @command{awk}, See @command{gawk}
+@cindex GNU @command{awk} @seeentry{@command{gawk}}
 Implementations of the @command{awk} language are available for many
 different computing environments.  This @value{DOCUMENT}, while describing
 the @command{awk} language in general, also describes the particular
@@ -1439,7 +1441,7 @@ more parts C.  Document very well and release.
 @cindex Aho, Alfred
 @cindex Weinberger, Peter
 @cindex Kernighan, Brian
-@cindex @command{awk}, history of
+@cindex @command{awk} @subentry history of
 The name @command{awk} comes from the initials of its designers: Alfred V.@:
 Aho, Peter J.@: Weinberger, and Brian W.@: Kernighan.  The original version of
 @command{awk} was written in 1977 at AT&T Bell Laboratories.
@@ -1486,7 +1488,7 @@ for a full list of those who have made important 
contributions to @command{gawk}
 @node Names
 @unnumberedsec A Rose by Any Other Name
 
-@cindex @command{awk}, new vs.@: old
+@cindex @command{awk} @subentry new vs.@: old
 The @command{awk} language has evolved over the years. Full details are
 provided in @ref{Language History}.
 The language described in this @value{DOCUMENT}
@@ -1521,7 +1523,7 @@ specific to the GNU implementation, we use the term 
@command{gawk}.
 
 @node This Manual
 @unnumberedsec Using This Book
-@cindex @command{awk}, terms describing
+@cindex @command{awk} @subentry terms describing
 
 The term @command{awk} refers to a particular program as well as to the 
language you
 use to tell this program what to do.  When we need to be careful, we call
@@ -1533,8 +1535,8 @@ run the @command{awk} utility.
 The term ``@command{awk} program'' refers to a program written by you in
 the @command{awk} programming language.
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, @command{awk} and
-@cindex @command{awk}, @command{gawk} and
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry @command{awk} and
+@cindex @command{awk} @subentry @command{gawk} and
 @cindex POSIX @command{awk}
 Primarily, this @value{DOCUMENT} explains the features of @command{awk}
 as defined in the POSIX standard.  It does so in the context of the
@@ -1893,7 +1895,7 @@ you illuminate, there's always a smaller but darker one.}
 @author Brian Kernighan
 @end quotation
 
-@cindex d.c., See dark corner
+@cindex d.c. @seeentry{dark corner}
 @cindex dark corner
 Until the POSIX standard (and @cite{@value{TITLE}}),
 many features of @command{awk} were either poorly documented or not
@@ -1913,7 +1915,7 @@ They also appear in the index under the heading ``dark 
corner.''
 But, as noted by the opening quote, any coverage of dark
 corners is by definition incomplete.
 
-@cindex c.e., See common extensions
+@cindex c.e. @seeentry{common extensions}
 Extensions to the standard @command{awk} language that are supported by
 more than one @command{awk} implementation are marked
 @ifclear FOR_PRINT
@@ -1937,8 +1939,9 @@ Emacs editor.  GNU Emacs is the most widely used version 
of Emacs today.
 
 @cindex GNU Project
 @cindex GPL (General Public License)
-@cindex General Public License, See GPL
-@cindex documentation, online
+@cindex GNU General Public License @seeentry{GPL}
+@cindex General Public License @seeentry{GPL}
+@cindex documentation @subentry online
 The GNU@footnote{GNU stands for ``GNU's Not Unix.''}
 Project is an ongoing effort on the part of the Free Software
 Foundation to create a complete, freely distributable, POSIX-compliant
@@ -1968,9 +1971,9 @@ freely available.  The GNU operating
 system kernel (the HURD), has been released but remains in an early
 stage of development.
 
-@cindex Linux
+@cindex Linux @seeentry{GNU/Linux}
 @cindex GNU/Linux
-@cindex operating systems, BSD-based
+@cindex operating systems @subentry BSD-based
 Until the GNU operating system is more fully developed, you should
 consider using GNU/Linux, a freely distributable, Unix-like operating
 system for Intel,
@@ -2134,10 +2137,10 @@ convincing me @emph{not} to title this @value{DOCUMENT}
 @cite{How to Gawk Politely}.
 Karl Berry helped significantly with the @TeX{} part of Texinfo.
 
-@cindex Hartholz, Marshall
-@cindex Hartholz, Elaine
-@cindex Schreiber, Bert
-@cindex Schreiber, Rita
+@cindex Hartholz @subentry Marshall
+@cindex Hartholz @subentry Elaine
+@cindex Schreiber @subentry Bert
+@cindex Schreiber @subentry Rita
 I would like to thank Marshall and Elaine Hartholz of Seattle and
 Dr.@: Bert and Rita Schreiber of Detroit for large amounts of quiet vacation
 time in their homes, which allowed me to make significant progress on
@@ -2251,9 +2254,9 @@ and for being a role model to me for close to 30 years!
 Having him as a reviewer is an exciting privilege. It has also
 been extremely humbling@enddots{}
 
-@cindex Robbins, Miriam
-@cindex Robbins, Jean
-@cindex Robbins, Harry
+@cindex Robbins @subentry Miriam
+@cindex Robbins @subentry Jean
+@cindex Robbins @subentry Harry
 @cindex G-d
 I must thank my wonderful wife, Miriam, for her patience through
 the many versions of this project, for her proofreading,
@@ -2320,7 +2323,7 @@ following chapters:
 @c @cindex rule, definition of
 @c @cindex program, definition of
 @c @cindex basic function of @command{awk}
-@cindex @command{awk}, function of
+@cindex @command{awk} @subentry function of
 
 The basic function of @command{awk} is to search files for lines (or other
 units of text) that contain certain patterns.  When a line matches one
@@ -2328,8 +2331,8 @@ of the patterns, @command{awk} performs specified actions 
on that line.
 @command{awk} continues to process input lines in this way until it reaches
 the end of the input files.
 
-@cindex @command{awk}, uses for
-@cindex programming languages@comma{} data-driven vs.@: procedural
+@cindex @command{awk} @subentry uses for
+@cindex programming languages @subentry data-driven vs.@: procedural
 @cindex @command{awk} programs
 Programs in @command{awk} are different from programs in most other languages,
 because @command{awk} programs are @dfn{data driven} (i.e., you describe
@@ -2382,7 +2385,7 @@ program looks like this:
 @node Running gawk
 @section How to Run @command{awk} Programs
 
-@cindex @command{awk} programs, running
+@cindex @command{awk} programs @subentry running
 There are several ways to run an @command{awk} program.  If the program is
 short, it is easiest to include it in the command that runs @command{awk},
 like this:
@@ -2391,7 +2394,7 @@ like this:
 awk '@var{program}' @var{input-file1} @var{input-file2} @dots{}
 @end example
 
-@cindex command line, formats
+@cindex command line @subentry formats
 When the program is long, it is usually more convenient to put it in a file
 and run it with a command like this:
 
@@ -2440,8 +2443,8 @@ characters.  The quotes also cause the shell to treat all 
of @var{program} as
 a single argument for @command{awk}, and allow @var{program} to be more
 than one line long.
 
-@cindex shells, scripts
-@cindex @command{awk} programs, running, from shell scripts
+@cindex shells @subentry scripts
+@cindex @command{awk} programs @subentry running @subentry from shell scripts
 This format is also useful for running short or medium-sized @command{awk}
 programs from shell scripts, because it avoids the need for a separate
 file for the @command{awk} program.  A self-contained shell script is more
@@ -2459,8 +2462,8 @@ self-contained programs.
 @subsection Running @command{awk} Without Input Files
 
 @cindex standard input
-@cindex input, standard
-@cindex input files, running @command{awk} without
+@cindex input @subentry standard
+@cindex input files @subentry running @command{awk} without
 You can also run @command{awk} without any input files.  If you type the
 following command line:
 
@@ -2474,9 +2477,9 @@ which usually means whatever you type on the keyboard.  
This continues
 until you indicate end-of-file by typing @kbd{Ctrl-d}.
 (On non-POSIX operating systems, the end-of-file character may be different.)
 
-@cindex files, input, See input files
-@cindex input files, running @command{awk} without
-@cindex @command{awk} programs, running, without input files
+@cindex files @subentry input @seeentry{input files}
+@cindex input files @subentry running @command{awk} without
+@cindex @command{awk} programs @subentry running @subentry without input files
 As an example, the following program prints a friendly piece of advice
 (from Douglas Adams's @cite{The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy}),
 to keep you from worrying about the complexities of computer
@@ -2522,9 +2525,9 @@ $ @kbd{awk '@{ print @}'}
 @node Long
 @subsection Running Long Programs
 
-@cindex @command{awk} programs, running
-@cindex @command{awk} programs, lengthy
-@cindex files, @command{awk} programs in
+@cindex @command{awk} programs @subentry running
+@cindex @command{awk} programs @subentry lengthy
+@cindex files @subentry @command{awk} programs in
 Sometimes @command{awk} programs are very long.  In these cases, it is
 more convenient to put the program into a separate file.  In order to tell
 @command{awk} to use that file for its program, you type:
@@ -2534,7 +2537,7 @@ awk -f @var{source-file} @var{input-file1} 
@var{input-file2} @dots{}
 @end example
 
 @cindex @option{-f} option
-@cindex command line, option @option{-f}
+@cindex command line @subentry option @option{-f}
 The @option{-f} instructs the @command{awk} utility to get the
 @command{awk} program from the file @var{source-file} (@pxref{Options}).
 Any @value{FN} can be used for @var{source-file}.  For example, you
@@ -2558,7 +2561,7 @@ does the same thing as this one:
 awk 'BEGIN @{ print "Don\47t Panic!" @}'
 @end example
 
-@cindex quoting, in @command{gawk} command lines
+@cindex quoting @subentry in @command{gawk} command lines
 @noindent
 This was explained earlier
 (@pxref{Read Terminal}).
@@ -2570,8 +2573,8 @@ for programs that are provided on the @command{awk} 
command line.
 (Also, placing the program in a file allows us to use a literal single quote 
in the program
 text, instead of the magic @samp{\47}.)
 
-@cindex single quote (@code{'}) in @command{gawk} command lines
-@cindex @code{'} (single quote) in @command{gawk} command lines
+@cindex single quote (@code{'}) @subentry in @command{gawk} command lines
+@cindex @code{'} (single quote) @subentry in @command{gawk} command lines
 If you want to clearly identify an @command{awk} program file as such,
 you can add the extension @file{.awk} to the @value{FN}.  This doesn't
 affect the execution of the @command{awk} program but it does make
@@ -2580,9 +2583,9 @@ affect the execution of the @command{awk} program but it 
does make
 @node Executable Scripts
 @subsection Executable @command{awk} Programs
 @cindex @command{awk} programs
-@cindex @code{#} (number sign), @code{#!} (executable scripts)
-@cindex Unix, @command{awk} scripts and
-@cindex number sign (@code{#}), @code{#!} (executable scripts)
+@cindex @code{#} (number sign) @subentry @code{#!} (executable scripts)
+@cindex Unix @subentry @command{awk} scripts and
+@cindex number sign (@code{#}) @subentry @code{#!} (executable scripts)
 
 Once you have learned @command{awk}, you may want to write self-contained
 @command{awk} scripts, using the @samp{#!} script mechanism.  You can do
@@ -2618,7 +2621,7 @@ program that users can invoke without their having to 
know that the program is
 written in @command{awk}.
 
 @sidebar Understanding @samp{#!}
-@cindex portability, @code{#!} (executable scripts)
+@cindex portability @subentry @code{#!} (executable scripts)
 
 @command{awk} is an @dfn{interpreted} language. This means that the
 @command{awk} utility reads your program and then processes your data
@@ -2647,9 +2650,9 @@ treats the rest of the line as a single argument and 
passes it to @command{awk}.
 Doing this leads to confusing behavior---most likely a usage diagnostic
 of some sort from @command{awk}.
 
-@cindex @code{ARGC}/@code{ARGV} variables, portability and
-@cindex portability, @code{ARGV} variable
-@cindex dark corner, @code{ARGV} variable, value of
+@cindex @code{ARGC}/@code{ARGV} variables @subentry portability and
+@cindex portability @subentry @code{ARGV} variable
+@cindex dark corner @subentry @code{ARGV} variable, value of
 Finally, the value of @code{ARGV[0]}
 (@pxref{Built-in Variables})
 varies depending upon your operating system.
@@ -2662,10 +2665,10 @@ to provide your script name.
 
 @node Comments
 @subsection Comments in @command{awk} Programs
-@cindex @code{#} (number sign), commenting
-@cindex number sign (@code{#}), commenting
+@cindex @code{#} (number sign) @subentry commenting
+@cindex number sign (@code{#}) @subentry commenting
 @cindex commenting
-@cindex @command{awk} programs, documenting
+@cindex @command{awk} programs @subentry documenting
 
 A @dfn{comment} is some text that is included in a program for the sake
 of human readers; it is not really an executable part of the program.  Comments
@@ -2690,9 +2693,9 @@ programs, but this usually isn't very useful; the purpose 
of a
 comment is to help you or another person understand the program
 when reading it at a later time.
 
-@cindex quoting, for small awk programs
-@cindex single quote (@code{'}), vs.@: apostrophe
-@cindex @code{'} (single quote), vs.@: apostrophe
+@cindex quoting @subentry for small awk programs
+@cindex single quote (@code{'}) @subentry vs.@: apostrophe
+@cindex @code{'} (single quote) @subentry vs.@: apostrophe
 @quotation CAUTION
 As mentioned in
 @ref{One-shot},
@@ -2748,7 +2751,7 @@ the shell prompt, or writing it as part of a larger shell 
script:
 awk '@var{program text}' @var{input-file1} @var{input-file2} @dots{}
 @end example
 
-@cindex shells, quoting, rules for
+@cindex shells @subentry quoting @subentry rules for
 @cindex Bourne shell, quoting rules for
 Once you are working with the shell, it is helpful to have a basic
 knowledge of shell quoting rules.  The following rules apply only to
@@ -2787,10 +2790,10 @@ that character.  The shell removes the backslash and 
passes the quoted
 character on to the command.
 
 @item
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), in shell commands
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), in shell commands
-@cindex single quote (@code{'}), in shell commands
-@cindex @code{'} (single quote), in shell commands
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry in shell commands
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry in shell commands
+@cindex single quote (@code{'}) @subentry in shell commands
+@cindex @code{'} (single quote) @subentry in shell commands
 Single quotes protect everything between the opening and closing quotes.
 The shell does no interpretation of the quoted text, passing it on verbatim
 to the command.
@@ -2800,8 +2803,8 @@ Refer back to
 for an example of what happens if you try.
 
 @item
-@cindex double quote (@code{"}), in shell commands
-@cindex @code{"} (double quote), in shell commands
+@cindex double quote (@code{"}) @subentry in shell commands
+@cindex @code{"} (double quote) @subentry in shell commands
 Double quotes protect most things between the opening and closing quotes.
 The shell does at least variable and command substitution on the quoted text.
 Different shells may do additional kinds of processing on double-quoted text.
@@ -2829,8 +2832,8 @@ $ @kbd{awk "BEGIN @{ print \"Don't Panic!\" @}"}
 @print{} Don't Panic!
 @end example
 
-@cindex single quote (@code{'}), with double quotes
-@cindex @code{'} (single quote), with double quotes
+@cindex single quote (@code{'}) @subentry with double quotes
+@cindex @code{'} (single quote) @subentry with double quotes
 Note that the single quote is not special within double quotes.
 
 @item
@@ -2844,7 +2847,7 @@ awk -F "" '@var{program}' @var{files} # correct
 @end example
 
 @noindent
-@cindex null strings in @command{gawk} arguments, quoting and
+@cindex null strings @subentry in @command{gawk} arguments, quoting and
 Don't use this:
 
 @example
@@ -2857,7 +2860,7 @@ as the value of @code{FS}, and the first @value{FN} as 
the text of the program!
 This results in syntax errors at best, and confusing behavior at worst.
 @end itemize
 
-@cindex quoting, in @command{gawk} command lines, tricks for
+@cindex quoting @subentry in @command{gawk} command lines @subentry tricks for
 Mixing single and double quotes is difficult.  You have to resort
 to shell quoting tricks, like this:
 
@@ -3019,7 +3022,7 @@ double-quote don't need duplication.
 @node Sample Data Files
 @section @value{DDF}s for the Examples
 
-@cindex input files, examples
+@cindex input files @subentry examples
 @cindex @code{mail-list} file
 Many of the examples in this @value{DOCUMENT} take their input from two sample
 @value{DF}s.  The first, @file{mail-list}, represents a list of peoples' names
@@ -3132,21 +3135,21 @@ $ @kbd{awk '/li/ @{ print $0 @}' mail-list}
 @print{} Samuel       555-3430     samuel.lanceolis@@shu.edu        A
 @end example
 
-@cindex actions, default
-@cindex patterns, default
+@cindex actions @subentry default
+@cindex patterns @subentry default
 In an @command{awk} rule, either the pattern or the action can be omitted,
 but not both.  If the pattern is omitted, then the action is performed
 for @emph{every} input line.  If the action is omitted, the default
 action is to print all lines that match the pattern.
 
-@cindex actions, empty
+@cindex actions @subentry empty
 Thus, we could leave out the action (the @code{print} statement and the
 braces) in the previous example and the result would be the same:
 @command{awk} prints all lines matching the pattern @samp{li}.  By comparison,
 omitting the @code{print} statement but retaining the braces makes an
 empty action that does nothing (i.e., no lines are printed).
 
-@cindex @command{awk} programs, one-line examples
+@cindex @command{awk} programs @subentry one-line examples
 Many practical @command{awk} programs are just a line or two long.  Following 
is a
 collection of useful, short programs to get you started.  Some of these
 programs contain constructs that haven't been covered yet. (The description
@@ -3351,7 +3354,7 @@ the file was last modified. Its output looks like this:
 @end example
 
 @noindent
-@cindex line continuations, with C shell
+@cindex line continuations @subentry with C shell
 The first field contains read-write permissions, the second field contains
 the number of links to the file, and the third field identifies the file's 
owner.
 The fourth field identifies the file's group.
@@ -3397,7 +3400,7 @@ awk '/12/  @{ print $0 @}
      /21/  @{ print $0 @}' mail-list inventory-shipped
 @end example
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, newlines in
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry newlines in
 However, @command{gawk} ignores newlines after any of the following
 symbols and keywords:
 
@@ -3414,8 +3417,8 @@ Splitting lines after @samp{?} and @samp{:} is a minor 
@command{gawk}
 extension; if @option{--posix} is specified
 (@pxref{Options}), then this extension is disabled.}
 
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), continuing lines and
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), continuing lines and
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry continuing lines and
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry continuing lines and
 If you would like to split a single statement into two lines at a point
 where a newline would terminate it, you can @dfn{continue} it by ending the
 first line with a backslash character (@samp{\}).  The backslash must be
@@ -3429,7 +3432,7 @@ awk '/This regular expression is too long, so continue it\
 @end example
 
 @noindent
-@cindex portability, backslash continuation and
+@cindex portability @subentry backslash continuation and
 We have generally not used backslash continuation in our sample programs.
 @command{gawk} places no limit on the
 length of a line, so backslash continuation is never strictly necessary;
@@ -3447,8 +3450,8 @@ lines in the middle of a regular expression or a string.
 @c solaris 2.7 nawk does not. Solaris /usr/xpg4/bin/awk does though!  sigh.
 
 @cindex @command{csh} utility
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), continuing lines and, in @command{csh}
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), continuing lines and, in @command{csh}
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry continuing lines and @subentry in 
@command{csh}
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry continuing lines and @subentry in 
@command{csh}
 @quotation CAUTION
 @emph{Backslash continuation does not work as described
 with the C shell.}  It works for @command{awk} programs in files and
@@ -3486,9 +3489,9 @@ begin on the same line as the pattern.  To have the 
pattern and action
 on separate lines, you @emph{must} use backslash continuation; there
 is no other option.
 
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), continuing lines and, comments and
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), continuing lines and, comments and
-@cindex commenting, backslash continuation and
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry continuing lines and @subentry comments 
and
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry continuing lines and @subentry comments 
and
+@cindex commenting @subentry backslash continuation and
 Another thing to keep in mind is that backslash continuation and
 comments do not mix. As soon as @command{awk} sees the @samp{#} that
 starts a comment, it ignores @emph{everything} on the rest of the
@@ -3510,11 +3513,11 @@ next line. However, the backslash-newline combination 
is never even
 noticed because it is ``hidden'' inside the comment. Thus, the
 @code{BEGIN} is noted as a syntax error.
 
-@cindex statements, multiple
-@cindex @code{;} (semicolon), separating statements in actions
-@cindex semicolon (@code{;}), separating statements in actions
-@cindex @code{;} (semicolon), separating rules
-@cindex semicolon (@code{;}), separating rules
+@cindex statements @subentry multiple
+@cindex @code{;} (semicolon) @subentry separating statements in actions
+@cindex semicolon (@code{;}) @subentry separating statements in actions
+@cindex @code{;} (semicolon) @subentry separating rules
+@cindex semicolon (@code{;}) @subentry separating rules
 When @command{awk} statements within one rule are short, you might want to put
 more than one of them on a line.  This is accomplished by separating the 
statements
 with a semicolon (@samp{;}).
@@ -3557,7 +3560,7 @@ systematically in @ref{Built-in Variables} and in
 @node When
 @section When to Use @command{awk}
 
-@cindex @command{awk}, uses for
+@cindex @command{awk} @subentry uses for
 Now that you've seen some of what @command{awk} can do,
 you might wonder how @command{awk} could be useful for you.  By using
 utility programs, advanced patterns, field separators, arithmetic
@@ -3588,7 +3591,7 @@ computer.
 The original @command{awk}'s capabilities were strained by tasks
 of such complexity, but modern versions are more capable.
 
-@cindex @command{awk} programs, complex
+@cindex @command{awk} programs @subentry complex
 If you find yourself writing @command{awk} scripts of more than, say,
 a few hundred lines, you might consider using a different programming
 language.  The shell is good at string and pattern matching; in addition,
@@ -3668,10 +3671,10 @@ things in this @value{CHAPTER} that don't interest you 
right now.
 
 @node Command Line
 @section Invoking @command{awk}
-@cindex command line, invoking @command{awk} from
-@cindex @command{awk}, invoking
-@cindex arguments, command-line, invoking @command{awk}
-@cindex options, command-line, invoking @command{awk}
+@cindex command line @subentry invoking @command{awk} from
+@cindex @command{awk} @subentry invoking
+@cindex arguments @subentry command-line @subentry invoking @command{awk}
+@cindex options @subentry command-line @subentry invoking @command{awk}
 
 There are two ways to run @command{awk}---with an explicit program or with
 one or more program files.  Here are templates for both of them; items
@@ -3684,12 +3687,12 @@ enclosed in [@dots{}] in these templates are optional:
 
 @cindex GNU long options
 @cindex long options
-@cindex options, long
+@cindex options @subentry long
 In addition to traditional one-letter POSIX-style options, @command{gawk} also
 supports GNU long options.
 
-@cindex dark corner, invoking @command{awk}
-@cindex lint checking, empty programs
+@cindex dark corner @subentry invoking @command{awk}
+@cindex lint checking @subentry empty programs
 It is possible to invoke @command{awk} with an empty program:
 
 @example
@@ -3697,7 +3700,7 @@ awk '' datafile1 datafile2
 @end example
 
 @cindex @option{--lint} option
-@cindex dark corner, empty programs
+@cindex dark corner @subentry empty programs
 @noindent
 Doing so makes little sense, though; @command{awk} exits
 silently when given an empty program.
@@ -3708,10 +3711,10 @@ warning that the program is empty.
 
 @node Options
 @section Command-Line Options
-@cindex options, command-line
-@cindex command line, options
+@cindex options @subentry command-line
+@cindex command line @subentry options
 @cindex GNU long options
-@cindex options, long
+@cindex options @subentry long
 
 Options begin with a dash and consist of a single character.
 GNU-style long options consist of two dashes and a keyword.
@@ -3723,7 +3726,7 @@ by whitespace.
 If a particular option with a value is given more than once, it is the
 last value that counts.
 
-@cindex POSIX @command{awk}, GNU long options and
+@cindex POSIX @command{awk} @subentry GNU long options and
 Each long option for @command{gawk} has a corresponding
 POSIX-style short option.
 The long and short options are
@@ -3735,7 +3738,7 @@ The following list describes options mandated by the 
POSIX standard:
 @itemx --field-separator @var{fs}
 @cindex @option{-F} option
 @cindex @option{--field-separator} option
-@cindex @code{FS} variable, @code{--field-separator} option and
+@cindex @code{FS} variable @subentry @code{--field-separator} option and
 Set the @code{FS} variable to @var{fs}
 (@pxref{Field Separators}).
 
@@ -3743,7 +3746,7 @@ Set the @code{FS} variable to @var{fs}
 @itemx --file @var{source-file}
 @cindex @option{-f} option
 @cindex @option{--file} option
-@cindex @command{awk} programs, location of
+@cindex @command{awk} programs @subentry location of
 Read the @command{awk} program source from @var{source-file}
 instead of in the first nonoption argument.
 This option may be given multiple times; the @command{awk}
@@ -3757,7 +3760,7 @@ at their beginning. @xref{Changing The Namespace}, for 
more information.
 @itemx --assign @var{var}=@var{val}
 @cindex @option{-v} option
 @cindex @option{--assign} option
-@cindex variables, setting
+@cindex variables @subentry setting
 Set the variable @var{var} to the value @var{val} @emph{before}
 execution of the program begins.  Such variable values are available
 inside the @code{BEGIN} rule
@@ -3767,8 +3770,8 @@ The @option{-v} option can only set one variable, but it 
can be used
 more than once, setting another variable each time, like this:
 @samp{awk @w{-v foo=1} @w{-v bar=2} @dots{}}.
 
-@cindex predefined variables, @code{-v} option@comma{} setting with
-@cindex variables, predefined, @code{-v} option@comma{} setting with
+@cindex predefined variables @subentry @code{-v} option, setting with
+@cindex variables @subentry predefined @subentry @code{-v} option, setting with
 @quotation CAUTION
 Using @option{-v} to set the values of the built-in
 variables may lead to surprising results.  @command{awk} will reset the
@@ -3787,15 +3790,15 @@ the abbreviations remain unique.
 The full list of @command{gawk}-specific options is provided next.
 
 @item --
-@cindex command line, options, end of
-@cindex options, command-line, end of
+@cindex command line @subentry options @subentry end of
+@cindex options @subentry command-line @subentry end of
 Signal the end of the command-line options.  The following arguments
 are not treated as options even if they begin with @samp{-}.  This
 interpretation of @option{--} follows the POSIX argument parsing
 conventions.
 
-@cindex @code{-} (hyphen), file names beginning with
-@cindex hyphen (@code{-}), file names beginning with
+@cindex @code{-} (hyphen) @subentry file names beginning with
+@cindex hyphen (@code{-}) @subentry file names beginning with
 This is useful if you have @value{FN}s that start with @samp{-},
 or in shell scripts, if you have @value{FN}s that will be specified
 by the user that could start with @samp{-}.
@@ -3826,7 +3829,7 @@ multibyte characters. This option is an easy way to tell 
@command{gawk},
 @itemx @option{--traditional}
 @cindex @option{-c} option
 @cindex @option{--traditional} option
-@cindex compatibility mode (@command{gawk}), specifying
+@cindex compatibility mode (@command{gawk}) @subentry specifying
 Specify @dfn{compatibility mode}, in which the GNU extensions to
 the @command{awk} language are disabled, so that @command{gawk} behaves just
 like BWK @command{awk}.
@@ -3841,7 +3844,7 @@ Also see
 @itemx @option{--copyright}
 @cindex @option{-C} option
 @cindex @option{--copyright} option
-@cindex GPL (General Public License), printing
+@cindex GPL (General Public License) @subentry printing
 Print the short version of the General Public License and then exit.
 
 @item @option{-d}[@var{file}]
@@ -3850,15 +3853,15 @@ Print the short version of the General Public License 
and then exit.
 @cindex @option{--dump-variables} option
 @cindex dump all variables of a program
 @cindex @file{awkvars.out} file
-@cindex files, @file{awkvars.out}
-@cindex variables, global, printing list of
+@cindex files @subentry @file{awkvars.out}
+@cindex variables @subentry global @subentry printing list of
 Print a sorted list of global variables, their types, and final values
 to @var{file}.  If no @var{file} is provided, print this
 list to a file named @file{awkvars.out} in the current directory.
 No space is allowed between the @option{-d} and @var{file}, if
 @var{file} is supplied.
 
-@cindex troubleshooting, typographical errors@comma{} global variables
+@cindex troubleshooting @subentry typographical errors, global variables
 Having a list of all global variables is a good way to look for
 typographical errors in your programs.
 You would also use this option if you have a large program with a lot of
@@ -3871,7 +3874,7 @@ names like @code{i}, @code{j}, etc.)
 @itemx @option{--debug}[@code{=}@var{file}]
 @cindex @option{-D} option
 @cindex @option{--debug} option
-@cindex @command{awk} debugging, enabling
+@cindex @command{awk} programs @subentry debugging, enabling
 Enable debugging of @command{awk} programs
 (@pxref{Debugging}).
 By default, the debugger reads commands interactively from the keyboard
@@ -3885,7 +3888,7 @@ No space is allowed between the @option{-D} and 
@var{file}, if
 @itemx @option{--source} @var{program-text}
 @cindex @option{-e} option
 @cindex @option{--source} option
-@cindex source code, mixing
+@cindex source code @subentry mixing
 Provide program source code in the @var{program-text}.
 This option allows you to mix source code in files with source
 code that you enter on the command line.
@@ -3920,7 +3923,7 @@ for more information.
 @itemx @option{--exec} @var{file}
 @cindex @option{-E} option
 @cindex @option{--exec} option
-@cindex @command{awk} programs, location of
+@cindex @command{awk} programs @subentry location of
 @cindex CGI, @command{awk} scripts for
 Similar to @option{-f}, read @command{awk} program text from @var{file}.
 There are two differences from @option{-f}:
@@ -3957,8 +3960,8 @@ with @samp{#!} scripts (@pxref{Executable Scripts}), like 
so:
 @itemx @option{--gen-pot}
 @cindex @option{-g} option
 @cindex @option{--gen-pot} option
-@cindex portable object files, generating
-@cindex files, portable object, generating
+@cindex portable object @subentry files @subentry generating
+@cindex files @subentry portable object @subentry generating
 Analyze the source program and
 generate a GNU @command{gettext} portable object template file on standard
 output for all string constants that have been marked for translation.
@@ -3969,9 +3972,9 @@ for information about this option.
 @itemx @option{--help}
 @cindex @option{-h} option
 @cindex @option{--help} option
-@cindex GNU long options, printing list of
-@cindex options, printing list of
-@cindex printing, list of options
+@cindex GNU long options @subentry printing list of
+@cindex options @subentry printing list of
+@cindex printing @subentry list of options
 Print a ``usage'' message summarizing the short- and long-style options
 that @command{gawk} accepts and then exit.
 
@@ -3979,7 +3982,7 @@ that @command{gawk} accepts and then exit.
 @itemx @option{--include} @var{source-file}
 @cindex @option{-i} option
 @cindex @option{--include} option
-@cindex @command{awk} programs, location of
+@cindex @command{awk} programs @subentry location of
 Read an @command{awk} source library from @var{source-file}.  This option
 is completely equivalent to using the @code{@@include} directive inside
 your program.  It is very similar to the @option{-f} option,
@@ -3999,7 +4002,7 @@ at their beginning.  @xref{Changing The Namespace}, for 
more information.
 @itemx @option{--load} @var{ext}
 @cindex @option{-l} option
 @cindex @option{--load} option
-@cindex loading, extensions
+@cindex loading extensions
 Load a dynamic extension named @var{ext}. Extensions
 are stored as system shared libraries.
 This option searches for the library using the @env{AWKLIBPATH}
@@ -4013,7 +4016,7 @@ a shared library.  This advanced feature is described in 
detail in @ref{Dynamic
 @itemx @option{--lint}[@code{=}@var{value}]
 @cindex @option{-l} option
 @cindex @option{--lint} option
-@cindex lint checking, issuing warnings
+@cindex lint checking @subentry issuing warnings
 @cindex warnings, issuing
 Warn about constructs that are dubious or nonportable to
 other @command{awk} implementations.
@@ -4048,9 +4051,9 @@ if @command{gawk} is not compiled to use the GNU MPFR and 
MP libraries
 @itemx @option{--non-decimal-data}
 @cindex @option{-n} option
 @cindex @option{--non-decimal-data} option
-@cindex hexadecimal values@comma{} enabling interpretation of
-@cindex octal values@comma{} enabling interpretation of
-@cindex troubleshooting, @code{--non-decimal-data} option
+@cindex hexadecimal values, enabling interpretation of
+@cindex octal values, enabling interpretation of
+@cindex troubleshooting @subentry @code{--non-decimal-data} option
 Enable automatic interpretation of octal and hexadecimal
 values in input data
 (@pxref{Nondecimal Data}).
@@ -4103,7 +4106,7 @@ be used to cancel the effect of an earlier @option{-s} 
option
 @itemx @option{--profile}[@code{=}@var{file}]
 @cindex @option{-p} option
 @cindex @option{--profile} option
-@cindex @command{awk} profiling, enabling
+@cindex @command{awk} @subentry profiling, enabling
 Enable profiling of @command{awk} programs
 (@pxref{Profiling}).
 Implies @option{--no-optimize}.
@@ -4121,7 +4124,7 @@ in the left margin, and function call counts for each 
function.
 @cindex @option{-P} option
 @cindex @option{--posix} option
 @cindex POSIX mode
-@cindex @command{gawk}, extensions@comma{} disabling
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry extensions, disabling
 Operate in strict POSIX mode.  This disables all @command{gawk}
 extensions (just like @option{--traditional}) and
 disables all extensions not allowed by POSIX.
@@ -4134,13 +4137,13 @@ restrictions apply:
 @itemize @value{BULLET}
 
 @cindex newlines
-@cindex whitespace, newlines as
+@cindex whitespace @subentry newlines as
 @item
 Newlines are not allowed after @samp{?} or @samp{:}
 (@pxref{Conditional Exp}).
 
 
-@cindex @code{FS} variable, TAB character as
+@cindex @code{FS} variable @subentry TAB character as
 @item
 Specifying @samp{-Ft} on the command line does not set the value
 of @code{FS} to be a single TAB character
@@ -4155,8 +4158,8 @@ data (@pxref{Locales}).
 
 @c @cindex automatic warnings
 @c @cindex warnings, automatic
-@cindex @option{--traditional} option, @code{--posix} option and
-@cindex @option{--posix} option, @code{--traditional} option and
+@cindex @option{--traditional} option @subentry @code{--posix} option and
+@cindex @option{--posix} option @subentry @code{--traditional} option and
 If you supply both @option{--traditional} and @option{--posix} on the
 command line, @option{--posix} takes precedence. @command{gawk}
 issues a warning if both options are supplied.
@@ -4165,7 +4168,7 @@ issues a warning if both options are supplied.
 @itemx @option{--re-interval}
 @cindex @option{-r} option
 @cindex @option{--re-interval} option
-@cindex regular expressions, interval expressions and
+@cindex regular expressions @subentry interval expressions and
 Allow interval expressions
 (@pxref{Regexp Operators})
 in regexps.
@@ -4208,27 +4211,34 @@ Warn about constructs that are not available in the 
original version of
 @itemx @option{--version}
 @cindex @option{-V} option
 @cindex @option{--version} option
-@cindex @command{gawk}, versions of, information about@comma{} printing
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry version of @subentry printing information 
about
 Print version information for this particular copy of @command{gawk}.
 This allows you to determine if your copy of @command{gawk} is up to date
 with respect to whatever the Free Software Foundation is currently
 distributing.
 It is also useful for bug reports
 (@pxref{Bugs}).
+
+@cindex @code{-} (hyphen) @subentry @code{--} end of options marker
+@cindex hyphen (@code{-}) @subentry @code{--} end of options marker
+@item @code{--}
+Mark the end of all options.
+Any command-line arguments following @code{--} are placed in @code{ARGV},
+even if they start with a minus sign.
 @end table
 
 As long as program text has been supplied,
 any other options are flagged as invalid with a warning message but
 are otherwise ignored.
 
-@cindex @option{-F} option, @option{-Ft} sets @code{FS} to TAB
+@cindex @option{-F} option @subentry @option{-Ft} sets @code{FS} to TAB
 In compatibility mode, as a special case, if the value of @var{fs} supplied
 to the @option{-F} option is @samp{t}, then @code{FS} is set to the TAB
 character (@code{"\t"}).  This is true only for @option{--traditional} and not
 for @option{--posix}
 (@pxref{Field Separators}).
 
-@cindex @option{-f} option, multiple uses
+@cindex @option{-f} option @subentry multiple uses
 The @option{-f} option may be used more than once on the command line.
 If it is, @command{awk} reads its program source from all of the named files, 
as
 if they had been concatenated together into one big file.  This is
@@ -4265,7 +4275,8 @@ the command line that follow the program text are entered 
into the
 command line looking for options.
 
 @cindex @env{POSIXLY_CORRECT} environment variable
-@cindex lint checking, @env{POSIXLY_CORRECT} environment variable
+@cindex environment variables @subentry @env{POSIXLY_CORRECT}
+@cindex lint checking @subentry @env{POSIXLY_CORRECT} environment variable
 @cindex POSIX mode
 If the environment variable @env{POSIXLY_CORRECT} exists,
 then @command{gawk} behaves in strict POSIX mode, exactly as if
@@ -4287,7 +4298,7 @@ POSIXLY_CORRECT=true
 export POSIXLY_CORRECT
 @end example
 
-@cindex @command{csh} utility, @env{POSIXLY_CORRECT} environment variable
+@cindex @command{csh} utility @subentry @env{POSIXLY_CORRECT} environment 
variable
 For a C shell-compatible
 shell,@footnote{Not recommended.}
 you would add this line to the @file{.login} file in your home directory:
@@ -4296,15 +4307,15 @@ you would add this line to the @file{.login} file in 
your home directory:
 setenv POSIXLY_CORRECT true
 @end example
 
-@cindex portability, @env{POSIXLY_CORRECT} environment variable
+@cindex portability @subentry @env{POSIXLY_CORRECT} environment variable
 Having @env{POSIXLY_CORRECT} set is not recommended for daily use,
 but it is good for testing the portability of your programs to other
 environments.
 
 @node Other Arguments
 @section Other Command-Line Arguments
-@cindex command line, arguments
-@cindex arguments, command-line
+@cindex command line @subentry arguments
+@cindex arguments @subentry command-line
 
 Any additional arguments on the command line are normally treated as
 input files to be processed in the order specified.   However, an
@@ -4326,10 +4337,10 @@ a variable assignment), precede the file name with 
@samp{./}, like so:
 awk -f program.awk file1 ./count=1 file2
 @end example
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, @code{ARGIND} variable in
-@cindex @code{ARGIND} variable, command-line arguments
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry @code{ARGIND} variable in
+@cindex @code{ARGIND} variable @subentry command-line arguments
 @cindex @code{ARGV} array, indexing into
-@cindex @code{ARGC}/@code{ARGV} variables, command-line arguments
+@cindex @code{ARGC}/@code{ARGV} variables @subentry command-line arguments
 All the command-line arguments are made available to your @command{awk} 
program in the
 @code{ARGV} array (@pxref{Built-in Variables}).  Command-line options
 and the program text (if present) are omitted from @code{ARGV}.
@@ -4343,7 +4354,7 @@ Changing @code{ARGC} and @code{ARGV} in your 
@command{awk} program lets
 you control how @command{awk} processes the input files; this is described
 in more detail in @ref{ARGC and ARGV}.
 
-@cindex input files, variable assignments and
+@cindex input files @subentry variable assignments and
 @cindex variable assignments and input files
 The distinction between @value{FN} arguments and variable-assignment
 arguments is made when @command{awk} is about to open the next input file.
@@ -4358,7 +4369,7 @@ variables assigned in this fashion are @emph{not} 
available inside a
 (@pxref{BEGIN/END}),
 because such rules are run before @command{awk} begins scanning the argument 
list.
 
-@cindex dark corner, escape sequences
+@cindex dark corner @subentry escape sequences
 The variable values given on the command line are processed for escape
 sequences (@pxref{Escape Sequences}).
 @value{DARKCORNER}
@@ -4379,7 +4390,7 @@ output formats, before scanning the @value{DF}s.  It is 
also useful for
 controlling state if multiple passes are needed over a @value{DF}.  For
 example:
 
-@cindex files, multiple passes over
+@cindex files @subentry multiple passes over
 @example
 awk 'pass == 1  @{ @var{pass 1 stuff} @}
      pass == 2  @{ @var{pass 2 stuff} @}' pass=1 mydata pass=2 mydata
@@ -4424,7 +4435,7 @@ this @value{FN} itself.)
 
 @node Environment Variables
 @section The Environment Variables @command{gawk} Uses
-@cindex environment variables used by @command{gawk}
+@cindex environment variables @subentry used by @command{gawk}
 
 A number of environment variables influence how @command{gawk}
 behaves.
@@ -4440,9 +4451,10 @@ behaves.
 @node AWKPATH Variable
 @subsection The @env{AWKPATH} Environment Variable
 @cindex @env{AWKPATH} environment variable
-@cindex directories, searching for source files
-@cindex search paths, for source files
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, @env{AWKPATH} 
environment variable
+@cindex environment variables @subentry @env{AWKPATH}
+@cindex directories @subentry searching @subentry for source files
+@cindex search paths @subentry for source files
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry 
@env{AWKPATH} environment variable
 @ifinfo
 The previous @value{SECTION} described how @command{awk} program files can be 
named
 on the command line with the @option{-f} option.
@@ -4526,9 +4538,10 @@ found, and @command{gawk} no longer needs to use 
@env{AWKPATH}.
 @node AWKLIBPATH Variable
 @subsection The @env{AWKLIBPATH} Environment Variable
 @cindex @env{AWKLIBPATH} environment variable
-@cindex directories, searching for loadable extensions
-@cindex search paths, for loadable extensions
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, @code{AWKLIBPATH} 
environment variable
+@cindex environment variables @subentry @env{AWKLIBPATH}
+@cindex directories @subentry searching @subentry for loadable extensions
+@cindex search paths @subentry for loadable extensions
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry 
@code{AWKLIBPATH} environment variable
 
 The @env{AWKLIBPATH} environment variable is similar to the @env{AWKPATH}
 variable, but it is used to search for loadable extensions (stored as
@@ -4682,9 +4695,11 @@ to @code{EXIT_FAILURE}.
 
 This @value{SECTION} describes a feature that is specific to @command{gawk}.
 
-@cindex @code{@@include} directive
+@cindex @code{@@} (at-sign) @subentry @code{@@include} directive
+@cindex at-sign (@code{@@}) @subentry @code{@@include} directive
 @cindex file inclusion, @code{@@include} directive
 @cindex including files, @code{@@include} directive
+@cindex @code{@@include} directive @sortas{include directive}
 The @code{@@include} keyword can be used to read external @command{awk} source
 files.  This gives you the ability to split large @command{awk} source files
 into smaller, more manageable pieces, and also lets you reuse common 
@command{awk}
@@ -4810,9 +4825,11 @@ at their beginning.  @xref{Changing The Namespace}, for 
more information.
 
 This @value{SECTION} describes a feature that is specific to @command{gawk}.
 
-@cindex @code{@@load} directive
-@cindex loading extensions, @code{@@load} directive
-@cindex extensions, loading, @code{@@load} directive
+@cindex @code{@@} (at-sign) @subentry @code{@@load} directive
+@cindex at-sign (@code{@@}) @subentry @code{@@load} directive
+@cindex loading extensions @subentry @code{@@load} directive
+@cindex extensions @subentry loadable @subentry loading, @code{@@load} 
directive
+@cindex @code{@@load} directive @sortas{load directive}
 The @code{@@load} keyword can be used to read external @command{awk} extensions
 (stored as system shared libraries).
 This allows you to link in compiled code that may offer superior
@@ -4855,8 +4872,8 @@ It also describes the @code{ordchr} extension.
 
 @c update this section for each release!
 
-@cindex options, deprecated
-@cindex features, deprecated
+@cindex options @subentry deprecated
+@cindex features @subentry deprecated
 @cindex obsolete features
 This @value{SECTION} describes features and/or command-line options from
 previous releases of @command{gawk} that either are not available in the
@@ -4878,7 +4895,7 @@ in case some option becomes obsolete in a future version 
of @command{gawk}.
 @node Undocumented
 @section Undocumented Options and Features
 @cindex undocumented features
-@cindex features, undocumented
+@cindex features @subentry undocumented
 @cindex Skywalker, Luke
 @cindex Kenobi, Obi-Wan
 @cindex jedi knights
@@ -4888,7 +4905,7 @@ in case some option becomes obsolete in a future version 
of @command{gawk}.
 @author Obi-Wan
 @end quotation
 
-@cindex shells, sea
+@cindex shells @subentry sea
 This @value{SECTION} intentionally left
 blank.
 
@@ -5072,8 +5089,8 @@ set of strings.
 Because regular expressions are such a fundamental part of @command{awk}
 programming, their format and use deserve a separate @value{CHAPTER}.
 
-@cindex forward slash (@code{/}) to enclose regular expressions
-@cindex @code{/} (forward slash) to enclose regular expressions
+@cindex forward slash (@code{/}) @subentry to enclose regular expressions
+@cindex @code{/} (forward slash) @subentry to enclose regular expressions
 A regular expression enclosed in slashes (@samp{/})
 is an @command{awk} pattern that matches every input record whose text
 belongs to that set.
@@ -5105,8 +5122,8 @@ regular expressions work, we present more complicated 
instances.
 @node Regexp Usage
 @section How to Use Regular Expressions
 
-@cindex patterns, regular expressions as
-@cindex regular expressions, as patterns
+@cindex patterns @subentry regexp constants as
+@cindex regular expressions @subentry as patterns
 A regular expression can be used as a pattern by enclosing it in
 slashes.  Then the regular expression is tested against the
 entire text of each record.  (Normally, it only needs
@@ -5122,18 +5139,18 @@ $ @kbd{awk '/li/ @{ print $2 @}' mail-list}
 @print{} 555-3430
 @end example
 
-@cindex regular expressions, operators
-@cindex operators, string-matching
+@cindex regular expressions @subentry operators
+@cindex operators @subentry string-matching
 @c @cindex operators, @code{~}
 @cindex string-matching operators
 @cindex @code{~} (tilde), @code{~} operator
 @cindex tilde (@code{~}), @code{~} operator
-@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point), @code{!~} operator
-@cindex exclamation point (@code{!}), @code{!~} operator
+@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point) @subentry @code{!~} operator
+@cindex exclamation point (@code{!}) @subentry @code{!~} operator
 @c @cindex operators, @code{!~}
-@cindex @code{if} statement, use of regexps in
-@cindex @code{while} statement, use of regexps in
-@cindex @code{do}-@code{while} statement, use of regexps in
+@cindex @code{if} statement @subentry use of regexps in
+@cindex @code{while} statement @subentry use of regexps in
+@cindex @code{do}-@code{while} statement @subentry use of regexps in
 @c @cindex statements, @code{if}
 @c @cindex statements, @code{while}
 @c @cindex statements, @code{do}
@@ -5191,8 +5208,8 @@ $ @kbd{awk '$1 !~ /J/' inventory-shipped}
 @end example
 
 @cindex regexp constants
-@cindex constant regexps
-@cindex regular expressions, constants, See regexp constants
+@cindex constants @subentry regexp
+@cindex regular expressions, constants @seeentry{regexp constants}
 When a regexp is enclosed in slashes, such as @code{/foo/}, we call it
 a @dfn{regexp constant}, much like @code{5.27} is a numeric constant and
 @code{"foo"} is a string constant.
@@ -5200,9 +5217,10 @@ a @dfn{regexp constant}, much like @code{5.27} is a 
numeric constant and
 @node Escape Sequences
 @section Escape Sequences
 
-@cindex escape sequences, in strings
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), in escape sequences
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), in escape sequences
+@cindex escape sequences
+@cindex escape sequences @seealso{backslash}
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry in escape sequences
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry in escape sequences
 Some characters cannot be included literally in string constants
 (@code{"foo"}) or regexp constants (@code{/foo/}).
 Instead, they should be represented with @dfn{escape sequences},
@@ -5232,50 +5250,51 @@ all the escape sequences used in @command{awk} and
 what they represent. Unless noted otherwise, all these escape
 sequences apply to both string constants and regexp constants:
 
+@cindex ASCII
 @table @code
 @item \\
 A literal backslash, @samp{\}.
 
 @c @cindex @command{awk} language, V.4 version
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), @code{\a} escape sequence
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), @code{\a} escape sequence
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry @code{\a} escape sequence
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry @code{\a} escape sequence
 @item \a
 The ``alert'' character, @kbd{Ctrl-g}, ASCII code 7 (BEL).
 (This often makes some sort of audible noise.)
 
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), @code{\b} escape sequence
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), @code{\b} escape sequence
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry @code{\b} escape sequence
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry @code{\b} escape sequence
 @item \b
 Backspace, @kbd{Ctrl-h}, ASCII code 8 (BS).
 
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), @code{\f} escape sequence
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), @code{\f} escape sequence
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry @code{\f} escape sequence
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry @code{\f} escape sequence
 @item \f
 Formfeed, @kbd{Ctrl-l}, ASCII code 12 (FF).
 
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), @code{\n} escape sequence
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), @code{\n} escape sequence
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry @code{\n} escape sequence
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry @code{\n} escape sequence
 @item \n
 Newline, @kbd{Ctrl-j}, ASCII code 10 (LF).
 
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), @code{\r} escape sequence
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), @code{\r} escape sequence
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry @code{\r} escape sequence
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry @code{\r} escape sequence
 @item \r
 Carriage return, @kbd{Ctrl-m}, ASCII code 13 (CR).
 
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), @code{\t} escape sequence
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), @code{\t} escape sequence
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry @code{\t} escape sequence
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry @code{\t} escape sequence
 @item \t
 Horizontal TAB, @kbd{Ctrl-i}, ASCII code 9 (HT).
 
 @c @cindex @command{awk} language, V.4 version
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), @code{\v} escape sequence
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), @code{\v} escape sequence
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry @code{\v} escape sequence
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry @code{\v} escape sequence
 @item \v
 Vertical TAB, @kbd{Ctrl-k}, ASCII code 11 (VT).
 
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), @code{\}@var{nnn} escape sequence
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), @code{\}@var{nnn} escape sequence
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry @code{\}@var{nnn} escape sequence
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry @code{\}@var{nnn} escape sequence
 @item \@var{nnn}
 The octal value @var{nnn}, where @var{nnn} stands for 1 to 3 digits
 between @samp{0} and @samp{7}.  For example, the code for the ASCII ESC
@@ -5283,10 +5302,10 @@ between @samp{0} and @samp{7}.  For example, the code 
for the ASCII ESC
 
 @c @cindex @command{awk} language, V.4 version
 @c @cindex @command{awk} language, POSIX version
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), @code{\x} escape sequence
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), @code{\x} escape sequence
-@cindex common extensions, @code{\x} escape sequence
-@cindex extensions, common@comma{} @code{\x} escape sequence
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry @code{\x} escape sequence
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry @code{\x} escape sequence
+@cindex common extensions @subentry @code{\x} escape sequence
+@cindex extensions @subentry common @subentry @code{\x} escape sequence
 @item \x@var{hh}@dots{}
 The hexadecimal value @var{hh}, where @var{hh} stands for a sequence
 of hexadecimal digits (@samp{0}--@samp{9}, and either @samp{A}--@samp{F}
@@ -5307,8 +5326,8 @@ As of @value{PVERSION} 4.2, only two digits
 are processed.
 @end quotation
 
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), @code{\/} escape sequence
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), @code{\/} escape sequence
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry @code{\/} escape sequence
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry @code{\/} escape sequence
 @item \/
 A literal slash (necessary for regexp constants only).
 This sequence is used when you want to write a regexp
@@ -5319,8 +5338,8 @@ Because the regexp is delimited by
 slashes, you need to escape any slash that is part of the pattern,
 in order to tell @command{awk} to keep processing the rest of the regexp.
 
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), @code{\"} escape sequence
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), @code{\"} escape sequence
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry @code{\"} escape sequence
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry @code{\"} escape sequence
 @item \"
 A literal double quote (necessary for string constants only).
 This sequence is used when you want to write a string
@@ -5342,20 +5361,20 @@ means that the next character should be taken 
literally, even if it would
 normally be a regexp operator.  For example, @code{/a\+b/} matches the three
 characters @samp{a+b}.
 
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), in escape sequences
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), in escape sequences
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry in escape sequences
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry in escape sequences
 @cindex portability
 For complete portability, do not use a backslash before any character not
 shown in the previous list or that is not an operator.
 
 @c 11/2014: Moved so as to not stack sidebars
 @sidebar Backslash Before Regular Characters
-@cindex portability, backslash in escape sequences
-@cindex POSIX @command{awk}, backslashes in string constants
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), in escape sequences, POSIX and
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), in escape sequences, POSIX and
+@cindex portability @subentry backslash in escape sequences
+@cindex POSIX @command{awk} @subentry backslashes in string constants
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry in escape sequences @subentry POSIX and
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry in escape sequences @subentry POSIX and
 
-@cindex troubleshooting, backslash before nonspecial character
+@cindex troubleshooting @subentry backslash before nonspecial character
 If you place a backslash in a string constant before something that is
 not one of the characters previously listed, POSIX @command{awk} purposely
 leaves what happens as undefined.  There are two choices:
@@ -5374,8 +5393,9 @@ surrounded by whitespace as the field separator. There 
should be
 two backslashes in the string: @samp{FS = @w{"[ \t]+\\|[ \t]+"}}.)
 @c I did this!  This is why I added the warning.
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, escape sequences
-@cindex Unix @command{awk}, backslashes in escape sequences
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry escape sequences
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry escape sequences @seealso{backslash}
+@cindex Unix @command{awk} @subentry backslashes in escape sequences
 @cindex @command{mawk} utility
 @item Leave the backslash alone
 Some other @command{awk} implementations do this.
@@ -5404,7 +5424,7 @@ literally.
 @end itemize
 
 @sidebar Escape Sequences for Metacharacters
-@cindex metacharacters, escape sequences for
+@cindex metacharacters @subentry escape sequences for
 
 Suppose you use an octal or hexadecimal
 escape to represent a regexp metacharacter.
@@ -5412,7 +5432,7 @@ escape to represent a regexp metacharacter.
 Does @command{awk} treat the character as a literal character or as a regexp
 operator?
 
-@cindex dark corner, escape sequences, for metacharacters
+@cindex dark corner @subentry escape sequences @subentry for metacharacters
 Historically, such characters were taken literally.
 @value{DARKCORNER}
 However, the POSIX standard indicates that they should be treated
@@ -5425,8 +5445,8 @@ escape sequences literally when used in regexp constants. 
Thus,
 
 @node Regexp Operators
 @section Regular Expression Operators
-@cindex regular expressions, operators
-@cindex metacharacters in regular expressions
+@cindex regular expressions @subentry operators
+@cindex metacharacters @subentry in regular expressions
 
 You can combine regular expressions with special characters,
 called @dfn{regular expression operators} or @dfn{metacharacters}, to
@@ -5454,17 +5474,17 @@ sequences and that are not listed here stand for 
themselves:
 
 @c Use @asis so the docbook comes out ok. Sigh.
 @table @asis
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), regexp operator
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), regexp operator
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry regexp operator
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry regexp operator
 @item @code{\}
 This suppresses the special meaning of a character when
 matching.  For example, @samp{\$}
 matches the character @samp{$}.
 
-@cindex regular expressions, anchors in
-@cindex Texinfo, chapter beginnings in files
-@cindex @code{^} (caret), regexp operator
-@cindex caret (@code{^}), regexp operator
+@cindex regular expressions @subentry anchors in
+@cindex Texinfo @subentry chapter beginnings in files
+@cindex @code{^} (caret) @subentry regexp operator
+@cindex caret (@code{^}) @subentry regexp operator
 @item @code{^}
 This matches the beginning of a string.  @samp{^@@chapter}
 matches @samp{@@chapter} at the beginning of a string,
@@ -5481,8 +5501,8 @@ The condition is not true in the following example:
 if ("line1\nLINE 2" ~ /^L/) @dots{}
 @end example
 
-@cindex @code{$} (dollar sign), regexp operator
-@cindex dollar sign (@code{$}), regexp operator
+@cindex @code{$} (dollar sign) @subentry regexp operator
+@cindex dollar sign (@code{$}) @subentry regexp operator
 @item @code{$}
 This is similar to @samp{^}, but it matches only at the end of a string.
 For example, @samp{p$}
@@ -5506,7 +5526,8 @@ concatenation, we can make a regular expression such as 
@samp{U.A}, which
 matches any three-character sequence that begins with @samp{U} and ends
 with @samp{A}.
 
-@cindex POSIX @command{awk}, period (@code{.})@comma{} using
+@cindex POSIX mode
+@cindex POSIX @command{awk} @subentry period (@code{.}), using
 In strict POSIX mode (@pxref{Options}),
 @samp{.} does not match the @sc{nul}
 character, which is a character with all bits equal to zero.
@@ -5516,9 +5537,9 @@ may not be able to match the @sc{nul} character.
 @cindex @code{[]} (square brackets), regexp operator
 @cindex square brackets (@code{[]}), regexp operator
 @cindex bracket expressions
-@cindex character sets, See Also bracket expressions
-@cindex character lists, See bracket expressions
-@cindex character classes, See bracket expressions
+@cindex character sets (in regular expressions) @seeentry{bracket expressions}
+@cindex character lists @seeentry{bracket expressions}
+@cindex character classes @seeentry{bracket expressions}
 @item @code{[}@dots{}@code{]}
 This is called a @dfn{bracket expression}.@footnote{In other literature,
 you may see a bracket expression referred to as either a
@@ -5530,7 +5551,7 @@ discussion of what can be inside the square brackets of a 
bracket expression
 is given in
 @ref{Bracket Expressions}.
 
-@cindex bracket expressions, complemented
+@cindex bracket expressions @subentry complemented
 @item @code{[^}@dots{}@code{]}
 This is a @dfn{complemented bracket expression}.  The first character after
 the @samp{[} @emph{must} be a @samp{^}.  It matches any characters
@@ -5550,8 +5571,8 @@ a lowercase English vowel.
 
 The alternation applies to the largest possible regexps on either side.
 
-@cindex @code{()} (parentheses), regexp operator
-@cindex parentheses @code{()}, regexp operator
+@cindex @code{()} (parentheses) @subentry regexp operator
+@cindex parentheses @code{()} @subentry regexp operator
 @item @code{(}@dots{}@code{)}
 Parentheses are used for grouping in regular expressions, as in
 arithmetic.  They can be used to concatenate regular expressions
@@ -5566,8 +5587,8 @@ one literally, precede it with a backslash. However, the 
right or
 closing parenthesis is only special when paired with a left parenthesis;
 an unpaired right parenthesis is (silently) treated as a regular character.
 
-@cindex @code{*} (asterisk), @code{*} operator, as regexp operator
-@cindex asterisk (@code{*}), @code{*} operator, as regexp operator
+@cindex @code{*} (asterisk) @subentry @code{*} operator @subentry as regexp 
operator
+@cindex asterisk (@code{*}) @subentry @code{*} operator @subentry as regexp 
operator
 @item @code{*}
 This symbol means that the preceding regular expression should be
 repeated as many times as necessary to find a match.  For example, @samp{ph*}
@@ -5585,21 +5606,23 @@ Second, @samp{*} finds as many repetitions as possible. 
If the text
 to be matched is @samp{phhhhhhhhhhhhhhooey}, @samp{ph*} matches all of
 the @samp{h}s.
 
-@cindex @code{+} (plus sign), regexp operator
-@cindex plus sign (@code{+}), regexp operator
+@cindex @code{+} (plus sign) @subentry regexp operator
+@cindex plus sign (@code{+}) @subentry regexp operator
 @item @code{+}
 This symbol is similar to @samp{*}, except that the preceding expression must 
be
 matched at least once.  This means that @samp{wh+y}
 would match @samp{why} and @samp{whhy}, but not @samp{wy}, whereas
 @samp{wh*y} would match all three.
 
-@cindex @code{?} (question mark), regexp operator
-@cindex question mark (@code{?}), regexp operator
+@cindex @code{?} (question mark) @subentry regexp operator
+@cindex question mark (@code{?}) @subentry regexp operator
 @item @code{?}
 This symbol is similar to @samp{*}, except that the preceding expression can be
 matched either once or not at all.  For example, @samp{fe?d}
 matches @samp{fed} and @samp{fd}, but nothing else.
 
+@cindex @code{@{@}} (braces) @subentry regexp operator
+@cindex braces (@code{@{@}}) @subentry regexp operator
 @cindex interval expressions, regexp operator
 @item @code{@{}@var{n}@code{@}}
 @itemx @code{@{}@var{n}@code{,@}}
@@ -5624,16 +5647,16 @@ Matches @samp{whhy}, @samp{whhhy}, and so on.
 @end table
 @end table
 
-@cindex precedence, regexp operators
-@cindex regular expressions, operators, precedence of
+@cindex precedence @subentry regexp operators
+@cindex regular expressions @subentry operators @subentry precedence of
 In regular expressions, the @samp{*}, @samp{+}, and @samp{?} operators,
 as well as the braces @samp{@{} and @samp{@}},
 have
 the highest precedence, followed by concatenation, and finally by @samp{|}.
 As in arithmetic, parentheses can change how operators are grouped.
 
-@cindex POSIX @command{awk}, regular expressions and
-@cindex @command{gawk}, regular expressions, precedence
+@cindex POSIX @command{awk} @subentry regular expressions and
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry regular expressions @subentry precedence
 In POSIX @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, the @samp{*}, @samp{+}, and
 @samp{?} operators stand for themselves when there is nothing in the
 regexp that precedes them.  For example, @code{/+/} matches a literal
@@ -5643,12 +5666,12 @@ usage as a syntax error.
 @node Interval Expressions
 @subsection Some Notes On Interval Expressions
 
-@cindex POSIX @command{awk}, interval expressions in
+@cindex POSIX @command{awk} @subentry interval expressions in
 Interval expressions were not traditionally available in @command{awk}.
 They were added as part of the POSIX standard to make @command{awk}
 and @command{egrep} consistent with each other.
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, interval expressions and
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry interval expressions and
 Initially, because old programs may use @samp{@{} and @samp{@}} in regexp
 constants,
 @command{gawk} did @emph{not} match interval expressions
@@ -5681,9 +5704,9 @@ when in compatibility mode (@pxref{Options}).
 @node Bracket Expressions
 @section Using Bracket Expressions
 @cindex bracket expressions
-@cindex bracket expressions, range expressions
+@cindex bracket expressions @subentry range expressions
 @cindex range expressions (regexps)
-@cindex character lists in regular expressions
+@cindex bracket expressions @subentry character lists
 
 As mentioned earlier, a bracket expression matches any character among
 those listed between the opening and closing square brackets.
@@ -5705,12 +5728,12 @@ the range 0--256).  To match a range of characters 
where the endpoints
 of the range are larger than 256, enter the multibyte encodings of
 the characters directly.
 
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), in bracket expressions
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), in bracket expressions
-@cindex @code{^} (caret), in bracket expressions
-@cindex caret (@code{^}), in bracket expressions
-@cindex @code{-} (hyphen), in bracket expressions
-@cindex hyphen (@code{-}), in bracket expressions
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry in bracket expressions
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry in bracket expressions
+@cindex @code{^} (caret) @subentry in bracket expressions
+@cindex caret (@code{^}) @subentry in bracket expressions
+@cindex @code{-} (hyphen) @subentry in bracket expressions
+@cindex hyphen (@code{-}) @subentry in bracket expressions
 To include one of the characters @samp{\}, @samp{]}, @samp{-}, or @samp{^} in a
 bracket expression, put a @samp{\} in front of it.  For example:
 
@@ -5724,7 +5747,7 @@ Additionally, if you place @samp{]} right after the 
opening
 @samp{[}, the closing bracket is treated as one of the
 characters to be matched.
 
-@cindex POSIX @command{awk}, bracket expressions and
+@cindex POSIX @command{awk} @subentry bracket expressions and
 @cindex Extended Regular Expressions (EREs)
 @cindex EREs (Extended Regular Expressions)
 @cindex @command{egrep} utility
@@ -5736,8 +5759,8 @@ of the POSIX specification for Extended Regular 
Expressions (EREs).
 POSIX EREs are based on the regular expressions accepted by the
 traditional @command{egrep} utility.
 
-@cindex bracket expressions, character classes
-@cindex POSIX @command{awk}, bracket expressions and, character classes
+@cindex bracket expressions @subentry character classes
+@cindex POSIX @command{awk} @subentry bracket expressions and @subentry 
character classes
 @dfn{Character classes} are a feature introduced in the POSIX standard.
 A character class is a special notation for describing
 lists of characters that have a specific attribute, but the
@@ -5805,6 +5828,7 @@ depends on various factors out of our control.
 @c Thanks to
 @c Date: Tue, 01 Jul 2014 07:39:51 +0200
 @c From: Hermann Peifer <address@hidden>
+@cindex ASCII
 Some utilities that match regular expressions provide a nonstandard
 @samp{[:ascii:]} character class; @command{awk} does not. However, you
 can simulate such a construct using @samp{[\x00-\x7F]}.  This matches
@@ -5819,8 +5843,8 @@ treat @code{[:blank:]} like @code{[:space:]}, incorrectly 
matching
 more characters than they should.  Caveat Emptor.
 @end quotation
 
-@cindex bracket expressions, collating elements
-@cindex bracket expressions, non-ASCII
+@cindex bracket expressions @subentry collating elements
+@cindex bracket expressions @subentry non-ASCII
 @cindex collating elements
 Two additional special sequences can appear in bracket expressions.
 These apply to non-ASCII character sets, which can have single symbols
@@ -5831,7 +5855,7 @@ and a grave-accented ``@`e'' are equivalent.)
 These sequences are:
 
 @table @asis
-@cindex bracket expressions, collating symbols
+@cindex bracket expressions @subentry collating symbols
 @cindex collating symbols
 @item Collating symbols
 Multicharacter collating elements enclosed between
@@ -5839,7 +5863,7 @@ Multicharacter collating elements enclosed between
 then @samp{[[.ch.]]} is a regexp that matches this collating element, whereas
 @samp{[ch]} is a regexp that matches either @samp{c} or @samp{h}.
 
-@cindex bracket expressions, equivalence classes
+@cindex bracket expressions @subentry equivalence classes
 @item Equivalence classes
 Locale-specific names for a list of
 characters that are equal. The name is enclosed between
@@ -5851,9 +5875,9 @@ that matches any of @samp{e}, @samp{@^e}, @samp{@'e}, or 
@samp{@`e}.
 
 These features are very valuable in non-English-speaking locales.
 
-@cindex internationalization, localization, character classes
-@cindex @command{gawk}, character classes and
-@cindex POSIX @command{awk}, bracket expressions and, character classes
+@cindex internationalization @subentry localization @subentry character classes
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry character classes and
+@cindex POSIX @command{awk} @subentry bracket expressions and @subentry 
character classes
 @quotation CAUTION
 The library functions that @command{gawk} uses for regular
 expression matching currently recognize only POSIX character classes;
@@ -5868,7 +5892,7 @@ taken literally. This is also true of @samp{.} and 
@samp{*}.
 @node Leftmost Longest
 @section How Much Text Matches?
 
-@cindex regular expressions, leftmost longest match
+@cindex regular expressions @subentry leftmost longest match
 @c @cindex matching, leftmost longest
 Consider the following:
 
@@ -5907,12 +5931,12 @@ and also @pxref{Field Separators}).
 @node Computed Regexps
 @section Using Dynamic Regexps
 
-@cindex regular expressions, computed
-@cindex regular expressions, dynamic
+@cindex regular expressions @subentry computed
+@cindex regular expressions @subentry dynamic
 @cindex @code{~} (tilde), @code{~} operator
 @cindex tilde (@code{~}), @code{~} operator
-@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point), @code{!~} operator
-@cindex exclamation point (@code{!}), @code{!~} operator
+@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point) @subentry @code{!~} operator
+@cindex exclamation point (@code{!}) @subentry @code{!~} operator
 @c @cindex operators, @code{~}
 @c @cindex operators, @code{!~}
 The righthand side of a @samp{~} or @samp{!~} operator need not be a
@@ -5943,11 +5967,11 @@ on the right.  This is true of any string-valued 
expression (such as
 @code{digits_regexp}, shown in the previous example), not just string 
constants.
 @end quotation
 
-@cindex regexp constants, slashes vs.@: quotes
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), in regexp constants
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), in regexp constants
-@cindex @code{"} (double quote), in regexp constants
-@cindex double quote (@code{"}), in regexp constants
+@cindex regexp constants @subentry slashes vs.@: quotes
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry in regexp constants
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry in regexp constants
+@cindex @code{"} (double quote) @subentry in regexp constants
+@cindex double quote (@code{"}) @subentry in regexp constants
 What difference does it make if the string is
 scanned twice? The answer has to do with escape sequences, and particularly
 with backslashes.  To get a backslash into a regular expression inside a
@@ -5959,9 +5983,9 @@ you have to type @code{"\\*"}.  The first backslash 
escapes the
 second one so that the string actually contains the
 two characters @samp{\} and @samp{*}.
 
-@cindex troubleshooting, regexp constants vs.@: string constants
-@cindex regexp constants, vs.@: string constants
-@cindex string constants, vs.@: regexp constants
+@cindex troubleshooting @subentry regexp constants vs.@: string constants
+@cindex regexp constants @subentry vs.@: string constants
+@cindex string @subentry constants @subentry vs.@: regexp constants
 Given that you can use both regexp and string constants to describe
 regular expressions, which should you use?  The answer is ``regexp
 constants,'' for several reasons:
@@ -5986,8 +6010,8 @@ intend a regexp match.
 @end itemize
 
 @sidebar Using @code{\n} in Bracket Expressions of Dynamic Regexps
-@cindex regular expressions, dynamic, with embedded newlines
-@cindex newlines, in dynamic regexps
+@cindex regular expressions @subentry dynamic @subentry with embedded newlines
+@cindex newlines @subentry in dynamic regexps
 
 Some older versions of @command{awk} do not allow the newline
 character to be used inside a bracket expression for a dynamic regexp:
@@ -6001,7 +6025,7 @@ $ @kbd{awk '$0 ~ "[ \t\n]"'}
 @error{}        $0 ~ "[ >>>  \t\n]" <<<
 @end example
 
-@cindex newlines, in regexp constants
+@cindex newlines @subentry in regexp constants
 But a newline in a regexp constant works with no problem:
 
 @example
@@ -6020,10 +6044,10 @@ occur often in practice, but it's worth noting for 
future reference.
 
 @c This section adapted (long ago) from the regex-0.12 manual
 
-@cindex regular expressions, operators, @command{gawk}
-@cindex @command{gawk}, regular expressions, operators
-@cindex operators, GNU-specific
-@cindex regular expressions, operators, for words
+@cindex regular expressions @subentry operators @subentry @command{gawk}
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry regular expressions @subentry operators
+@cindex operators @subentry GNU-specific
+@cindex regular expressions @subentry operators @subentry for words
 @cindex word, regexp definition of
 GNU software that deals with regular expressions provides a number of
 additional regexp operators.  These operators are described in this
@@ -6035,64 +6059,64 @@ or underscores (@samp{_}):
 
 @table @code
 @c @cindex operators, @code{\s} (@command{gawk})
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), @code{\s} operator (@command{gawk})
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), @code{\s} operator (@command{gawk})
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry @code{\s} operator (@command{gawk})
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry @code{\s} operator (@command{gawk})
 @item \s
 Matches any whitespace character.
 Think of it as shorthand for
 @w{@samp{[[:space:]]}}.
 
 @c @cindex operators, @code{\S} (@command{gawk})
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), @code{\S} operator (@command{gawk})
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), @code{\S} operator (@command{gawk})
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry @code{\S} operator (@command{gawk})
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry @code{\S} operator (@command{gawk})
 @item \S
 Matches any character that is not whitespace.
 Think of it as shorthand for
 @w{@samp{[^[:space:]]}}.
 
 @c @cindex operators, @code{\w} (@command{gawk})
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), @code{\w} operator (@command{gawk})
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), @code{\w} operator (@command{gawk})
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry @code{\w} operator (@command{gawk})
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry @code{\w} operator (@command{gawk})
 @item \w
 Matches any word-constituent character---that is, it matches any
 letter, digit, or underscore. Think of it as shorthand for
 @w{@samp{[[:alnum:]_]}}.
 
 @c @cindex operators, @code{\W} (@command{gawk})
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), @code{\W} operator (@command{gawk})
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), @code{\W} operator (@command{gawk})
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry @code{\W} operator (@command{gawk})
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry @code{\W} operator (@command{gawk})
 @item \W
 Matches any character that is not word-constituent.
 Think of it as shorthand for
 @w{@samp{[^[:alnum:]_]}}.
 
 @c @cindex operators, @code{\<} (@command{gawk})
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), @code{\<} operator (@command{gawk})
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), @code{\<} operator (@command{gawk})
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry @code{\<} operator (@command{gawk})
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry @code{\<} operator (@command{gawk})
 @item \<
 Matches the empty string at the beginning of a word.
 For example, @code{/\<away/} matches @samp{away} but not
 @samp{stowaway}.
 
 @c @cindex operators, @code{\>} (@command{gawk})
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), @code{\>} operator (@command{gawk})
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), @code{\>} operator (@command{gawk})
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry @code{\>} operator (@command{gawk})
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry @code{\>} operator (@command{gawk})
 @item \>
 Matches the empty string at the end of a word.
 For example, @code{/stow\>/} matches @samp{stow} but not @samp{stowaway}.
 
 @c @cindex operators, @code{\y} (@command{gawk})
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), @code{\y} operator (@command{gawk})
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), @code{\y} operator (@command{gawk})
-@cindex word boundaries@comma{} matching
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry @code{\y} operator (@command{gawk})
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry @code{\y} operator (@command{gawk})
+@cindex word boundaries, matching
 @item \y
 Matches the empty string at either the beginning or the
 end of a word (i.e., the word boundar@strong{y}).  For example, 
@samp{\yballs?\y}
 matches either @samp{ball} or @samp{balls}, as a separate word.
 
 @c @cindex operators, @code{\B} (@command{gawk})
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), @code{\B} operator (@command{gawk})
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), @code{\B} operator (@command{gawk})
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry @code{\B} operator (@command{gawk})
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry @code{\B} operator (@command{gawk})
 @item \B
 Matches the empty string that occurs between two
 word-constituent characters. For example,
@@ -6100,9 +6124,9 @@ word-constituent characters. For example,
 @samp{\B} is essentially the opposite of @samp{\y}.
 @end table
 
-@cindex buffers, operators for
-@cindex regular expressions, operators, for buffers
-@cindex operators, string-matching, for buffers
+@cindex buffers @subentry operators for
+@cindex regular expressions @subentry operators @subentry for buffers
+@cindex operators @subentry string-matching @subentry for buffers
 There are two other operators that work on buffers.  In Emacs, a
 @dfn{buffer} is, naturally, an Emacs buffer.
 Other GNU programs, including @command{gawk},
@@ -6112,31 +6136,31 @@ The operators are:
 @table @code
 @item \`
 @c @cindex operators, @code{\`} (@command{gawk})
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), @code{\`} operator (@command{gawk})
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), @code{\`} operator (@command{gawk})
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry @code{\`} operator (@command{gawk})
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry @code{\`} operator (@command{gawk})
 Matches the empty string at the
 beginning of a buffer (string)
 
 @c @cindex operators, @code{\'} (@command{gawk})
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), @code{\'} operator (@command{gawk})
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), @code{\'} operator (@command{gawk})
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry @code{\'} operator (@command{gawk})
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry @code{\'} operator (@command{gawk})
 @item \'
 Matches the empty string at the
 end of a buffer (string)
 @end table
 
-@cindex @code{^} (caret), regexp operator
-@cindex caret (@code{^}), regexp operator
-@cindex @code{?} (question mark), regexp operator
-@cindex question mark (@code{?}), regexp operator
+@cindex @code{^} (caret) @subentry regexp operator
+@cindex caret (@code{^}) @subentry regexp operator
+@cindex @code{?} (question mark) @subentry regexp operator
+@cindex question mark (@code{?}) @subentry regexp operator
 Because @samp{^} and @samp{$} always work in terms of the beginning
 and end of strings, these operators don't add any new capabilities
 for @command{awk}.  They are provided for compatibility with other
 GNU software.
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, word-boundary operator
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry word-boundary operator
 @cindex word-boundary operator (@command{gawk})
-@cindex operators, word-boundary (@command{gawk})
+@cindex operators @subentry word-boundary (@command{gawk})
 In other GNU software, the word-boundary operator is @samp{\b}. However,
 that conflicts with the @command{awk} language's definition of @samp{\b}
 as backspace, so @command{gawk} uses a different letter.
@@ -6145,8 +6169,8 @@ GNU operators, but this was deemed too confusing. The 
current
 method of using @samp{\y} for the GNU @samp{\b} appears to be the
 lesser of two evils.
 
-@cindex regular expressions, @command{gawk}, command-line options
-@cindex @command{gawk}, command-line options, and regular expressions
+@cindex regular expressions @subentry @command{gawk}, command-line options
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry command-line options, regular expressions and
 The various command-line options
 (@pxref{Options})
 control how @command{gawk} interprets characters in regexps:
@@ -6189,8 +6213,8 @@ Otherwise, interval expressions are available by default.
 @node Case-sensitivity
 @section Case Sensitivity in Matching
 
-@cindex regular expressions, case sensitivity
-@cindex case sensitivity, regexps and
+@cindex regular expressions @subentry case sensitivity
+@cindex case sensitivity @subentry regexps and
 Case is normally significant in regular expressions, both when matching
 ordinary characters (i.e., not metacharacters) and inside bracket
 expressions.  Thus, a @samp{w} in a regular expression matches only a lowercase
@@ -6216,15 +6240,15 @@ tolower($1) ~ /foo/  @{ @dots{} @}
 converts the first field to lowercase before matching against it.
 This works in any POSIX-compliant @command{awk}.
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, regular expressions, case sensitivity
-@cindex case sensitivity, @command{gawk}
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, regular expressions
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry regular expressions @subentry case sensitivity
+@cindex case sensitivity @subentry @command{gawk}
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry regular 
expressions
 @cindex @code{~} (tilde), @code{~} operator
 @cindex tilde (@code{~}), @code{~} operator
-@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point), @code{!~} operator
-@cindex exclamation point (@code{!}), @code{!~} operator
-@cindex @code{IGNORECASE} variable, with @code{~} and @code{!~} operators
-@cindex @command{gawk}, @code{IGNORECASE} variable in
+@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point) @subentry @code{!~} operator
+@cindex exclamation point (@code{!}) @subentry @code{!~} operator
+@cindex @code{IGNORECASE} variable @subentry with @code{~} and @code{!~} 
operators
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry @code{IGNORECASE} variable in
 @c @cindex variables, @code{IGNORECASE}
 Another method, specific to @command{gawk}, is to set the variable
 @code{IGNORECASE} to a nonzero value (@pxref{Built-in Variables}).
@@ -6329,7 +6353,7 @@ versions, use @code{tolower()} or @code{toupper()}.
 @chapter Reading Input Files
 
 @cindex reading input files
-@cindex input files, reading
+@cindex input files @subentry reading
 @cindex input files
 @cindex @code{FILENAME} variable
 In the typical @command{awk} program,
@@ -6381,8 +6405,8 @@ used with it do not have to be named on the @command{awk} 
command line
 @node Records
 @section How Input Is Split into Records
 
-@cindex input, splitting into records
-@cindex records, splitting input into
+@cindex input @subentry splitting into records
+@cindex records @subentry splitting input into
 @cindex @code{NR} variable
 @cindex @code{FNR} variable
 @command{awk} divides the input for your program into records and fields.
@@ -6407,7 +6431,7 @@ This mechanism is explained in greater detail shortly.
 @node awk split records
 @subsection Record Splitting with Standard @command{awk}
 
-@cindex separators, for records
+@cindex separators @subentry for records
 @cindex record separators
 Records are separated by a character called the @dfn{record separator}.
 By default, the record separator is the newline character.
@@ -6415,8 +6439,8 @@ This is why records are, by default, single lines.
 To use a different character for the record separator,
 simply assign that character to the predefined variable @code{RS}.
 
-@cindex record separators, newlines as
-@cindex newlines, as record separators
+@cindex record separators @subentry newlines as
+@cindex newlines @subentry as record separators
 @cindex @code{RS} variable
 Like any other variable,
 the value of @code{RS} can be changed in the @command{awk} program
@@ -6508,8 +6532,8 @@ the newline separating them in the output
 is the original newline in the @value{DF}, not the one added by
 @command{awk} when it printed the record!
 
-@cindex record separators, changing
-@cindex separators, for records
+@cindex record separators @subentry changing
+@cindex separators @subentry for records
 Another way to change the record separator is on the command line,
 using the variable-assignment feature
 (@pxref{Other Arguments}):
@@ -6550,14 +6574,14 @@ variable @code{NF} is the number of fields in the 
current record.
 printing @samp{0} as the result. Most other versions of @command{awk}
 also act this way.)
 
-@cindex dark corner, input files
+@cindex dark corner @subentry input files
 Reaching the end of an input file terminates the current input record,
 even if the last character in the file is not the character in @code{RS}.
 @value{DARKCORNER}
 
-@cindex empty strings
+@cindex empty strings @seeentry{null strings}
 @cindex null strings
-@cindex strings, empty, See null strings
+@cindex strings @subentry empty @seeentry{null strings}
 The empty string @code{""} (a string without any characters)
 has a special meaning
 as the value of @code{RS}. It means that records are separated
@@ -6569,15 +6593,15 @@ the new value is used to delimit subsequent records, 
but the record
 currently being processed, as well as records already processed, are not
 affected.
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, @code{RT} variable in
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry @code{RT} variable in
 @cindex @code{RT} variable
-@cindex records, terminating
+@cindex records @subentry terminating
 @cindex terminating records
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, record separators
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, @code{RS}/@code{RT} 
variables
-@cindex regular expressions, as record separators
-@cindex record separators, regular expressions as
-@cindex separators, for records, regular expressions as
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry record 
separators
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry 
@code{RS}/@code{RT} variables
+@cindex regular expressions @subentry as record separators
+@cindex record separators @subentry regular expressions as
+@cindex separators @subentry for records @subentry regular expressions as
 After the end of the record has been determined, @command{gawk}
 sets the variable @code{RT} to the text in the input that matched
 @code{RS}.
@@ -6585,8 +6609,8 @@ sets the variable @code{RT} to the text in the input that 
matched
 @node gawk split records
 @subsection Record Splitting with @command{gawk}
 
-@cindex common extensions, @code{RS} as a regexp
-@cindex extensions, common@comma{} @code{RS} as a regexp
+@cindex common extensions @subentry @code{RS} as a regexp
+@cindex extensions @subentry common @subentry @code{RS} as a regexp
 When using @command{gawk}, the value of @code{RS} is not limited to a
 one-character string.  If it contains more than one character, it is
 treated as a regular expression
@@ -6650,9 +6674,9 @@ that happens to contain newline characters.
 It is thus best to avoid anchor metacharacters in the value of @code{RS}.
 @end quotation
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, @code{RT} variable in
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry @code{RT} variable in
 @cindex @code{RT} variable
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, @code{RS}/@code{RT} 
variables
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry 
@code{RS}/@code{RT} variables
 The use of @code{RS} as a regular expression and the @code{RT}
 variable are @command{gawk} extensions; they are not available in
 compatibility mode
@@ -6661,7 +6685,7 @@ In compatibility mode, only the first character of the 
value of
 @code{RS} determines the end of the record.
 
 @sidebar @code{RS = "\0"} Is Not Portable
-@cindex portability, data files as single record
+@cindex portability @subentry data files as single record
 There are times when you might want to treat an entire @value{DF} as a
 single record.  The only way to make this happen is to give @code{RS}
 a value that you know doesn't occur in the input file.  This is hard
@@ -6676,7 +6700,7 @@ value to use for @code{RS} in this case:
 BEGIN @{ RS = "\0" @}  # whole file becomes one record?
 @end example
 
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, strings, storing
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry strings 
@subentry storing
 @command{gawk} in fact accepts this, and uses the @sc{nul}
 character for the record separator.
 This works for certain special files, such as @file{/proc/environ} on
@@ -6684,7 +6708,7 @@ GNU/Linux systems, where the @sc{nul} character is in 
fact the record separator.
 However, this usage is @emph{not} portable
 to most other @command{awk} implementations.
 
-@cindex dark corner, strings, storing
+@cindex dark corner @subentry strings, storing
 Almost all other @command{awk} implementations@footnote{At least that we know
 about.} store strings internally as C-style strings.  C strings use the
 @sc{nul} character as the string terminator.  In effect, this means that
@@ -6696,7 +6720,7 @@ character as a record separator. However, this is a 
special case:
 @command{mawk} does not allow embedded @sc{nul} characters in strings.
 (This may change in a future version of @command{mawk}.)
 
-@cindex records, treating files as
+@cindex records @subentry treating files as
 @cindex treating files, as single records
 @cindex single records, treating files as
 @xref{Readfile Function} for an interesting way to read
@@ -6710,7 +6734,7 @@ Readfile} for another option.
 @cindex examining fields
 @cindex fields
 @cindex accessing fields
-@cindex fields, examining
+@cindex fields @subentry examining
 When @command{awk} reads an input record, the record is
 automatically @dfn{parsed} or separated by the @command{awk} utility into 
chunks
 called @dfn{fields}.  By default, fields are separated by @dfn{whitespace},
@@ -6727,9 +6751,9 @@ operate on the whole record if you want---but fields are 
what make
 simple @command{awk} programs so powerful.
 
 @cindex field operator @code{$}
-@cindex @code{$} (dollar sign), @code{$} field operator
-@cindex dollar sign (@code{$}), @code{$} field operator
-@cindex field operators@comma{} dollar sign as
+@cindex @code{$} (dollar sign) @subentry @code{$} field operator
+@cindex dollar sign (@code{$}) @subentry @code{$} field operator
+@cindex field operators, dollar sign as
 You use a dollar sign (@samp{$})
 to refer to a field in an @command{awk} program,
 followed by the number of the field you want.  Thus, @code{$1}
@@ -6750,7 +6774,7 @@ Here the first field, or @code{$1}, is @samp{This}, the 
second field, or
 field.
 
 @cindex @code{NF} variable
-@cindex fields, number of
+@cindex fields @subentry number of
 @code{NF} is a predefined variable whose value is the number of fields
 in the current record.  @command{awk} automatically updates the value
 of @code{NF} each time it reads a record.  No matter how many fields
@@ -6789,7 +6813,7 @@ $ @kbd{awk '/li/ @{ print $1, $NF @}' mail-list}
 
 @node Nonconstant Fields
 @section Nonconstant Field Numbers
-@cindex fields, numbers
+@cindex fields @subentry numbers
 @cindex field numbers
 
 A field number need not be a constant.  Any expression in
@@ -6846,7 +6870,7 @@ evaluating @code{NF} and using its value as a field 
number.
 @node Changing Fields
 @section Changing the Contents of a Field
 
-@cindex fields, changing contents of
+@cindex fields @subentry changing contents of
 The contents of a field, as seen by @command{awk}, can be changed within an
 @command{awk} program; this changes what @command{awk} perceives as the
 current input record.  (The actual input is untouched; @command{awk} 
@emph{never}
@@ -6906,8 +6930,8 @@ $ @kbd{awk '@{ $6 = ($5 + $4 + $3 + $2)}
 @dots{}
 @end example
 
-@cindex adding, fields
-@cindex fields, adding
+@cindex adding @subentry fields
+@cindex fields @subentry adding
 @noindent
 We've just created @code{$6}, whose value is the sum of fields
 @code{$2}, @code{$3}, @code{$4}, and @code{$5}.  The @samp{+} sign
@@ -6921,8 +6945,8 @@ the appropriate number of field separators between it and 
the previously
 existing fields.
 
 @cindex @code{OFS} variable
-@cindex output field separator, See @code{OFS} variable
-@cindex field separators, See Also @code{OFS}
+@cindex output field separator @seeentry{@code{OFS} variable}
+@cindex field separator @seealso{@code{OFS}}
 This recomputation affects and is affected by
 @code{NF} (the number of fields; @pxref{Fields}).
 For example, the value of @code{NF} is set to the number of the highest
@@ -6979,8 +7003,8 @@ The intervening field, @code{$5}, is created with an 
empty value
 (indicated by the second pair of adjacent colons),
 and @code{NF} is updated with the value six.
 
-@cindex dark corner, @code{NF} variable, decrementing
-@cindex @code{NF} variable, decrementing
+@cindex dark corner @subentry @code{NF} variable, decrementing
+@cindex @code{NF} variable @subentry decrementing
 Decrementing @code{NF} throws away the values of the fields
 after the new value of @code{NF} and recomputes @code{$0}.
 @value{DARKCORNER}
@@ -6993,7 +7017,7 @@ $ @kbd{echo a b c d e f | awk '@{ print "NF =", NF;}
 @print{} a b c
 @end example
 
-@cindex portability, @code{NF} variable@comma{} decrementing
+@cindex portability @subentry @code{NF} variable, decrementing
 @quotation CAUTION
 Some versions of @command{awk} don't
 rebuild @code{$0} when @code{NF} is decremented.
@@ -7055,9 +7079,9 @@ with a statement such as @samp{$1 = $1}, as described 
earlier.
 @end menu
 
 @cindex @code{FS} variable
-@cindex fields, separating
-@cindex field separators
-@cindex fields, separating
+@cindex fields @subentry separating
+@cindex field separator
+@cindex fields @subentry separating
 The @dfn{field separator}, which is either a single character or a regular
 expression, controls the way @command{awk} splits an input record into fields.
 @command{awk} scans the input record for character sequences that
@@ -7076,13 +7100,13 @@ is split into three fields: @samp{m}, 
@samp{@bullet{}g}, and
 @samp{@bullet{}gai@bullet{}pan}.
 Note the leading spaces in the values of the second and third fields.
 
-@cindex troubleshooting, @command{awk} uses @code{FS} not @code{IFS}
+@cindex troubleshooting @subentry @command{awk} uses @code{FS} not @code{IFS}
 The field separator is represented by the predefined variable @code{FS}.
 Shell programmers take note:  @command{awk} does @emph{not} use the
 name @code{IFS} that is used by the POSIX-compliant shells (such as
 the Unix Bourne shell, @command{sh}, or Bash).
 
-@cindex @code{FS} variable, changing value of
+@cindex @code{FS} variable @subentry changing value of
 The value of @code{FS} can be changed in the @command{awk} program with the
 assignment operator, @samp{=} (@pxref{Assignment Ops}).
 Often, the right time to do this is at the beginning of execution
@@ -7109,9 +7133,9 @@ John Q. Smith, 29 Oak St., Walamazoo, MI 42139
 this @command{awk} program extracts and prints the string
 @samp{@bullet{}29@bullet{}Oak@bullet{}St.}.
 
-@cindex field separators, choice of
-@cindex regular expressions, as field separators
-@cindex field separators, regular expressions as
+@cindex field separator @subentry choice of
+@cindex regular expressions @subentry as field separators
+@cindex field separator @subentry regular expression as
 Sometimes the input data contains separator characters that don't
 separate fields the way you thought they would.  For instance, the
 person's name in the example we just used might have a title or
@@ -7134,8 +7158,10 @@ can massage it first with a separate @command{awk} 
program.)
 @node Default Field Splitting
 @subsection Whitespace Normally Separates Fields
 
-@cindex field separators, whitespace as
-@cindex whitespace, as field separators
+@cindex field separator @subentry whitespace as
+@cindex whitespace @subentry as field separators
+@cindex field separator @subentry @code{FS} variable and
+@cindex separators @subentry field @subentry @code{FS} variable and
 Fields are normally separated by whitespace sequences
 (spaces, TABs, and newlines), not by single spaces.  Two spaces in a row do not
 delimit an empty field.  The default value of the field separator @code{FS}
@@ -7156,8 +7182,8 @@ rules.
 @node Regexp Field Splitting
 @subsection Using Regular Expressions to Separate Fields
 
-@cindex regular expressions, as field separators
-@cindex field separators, regular expressions as
+@cindex regular expressions @subentry as field separators
+@cindex field separator @subentry regular expression as
 The previous @value{SUBSECTION}
 discussed the use of single characters or simple strings as the
 value of @code{FS}.
@@ -7212,8 +7238,7 @@ $ @kbd{echo ' a  b  c  d ' | awk 'BEGIN @{ FS = "[ 
\t\n]+" @}}
 
 @noindent
 @cindex null strings
-@cindex strings, null
-@cindex empty strings, See null strings
+@cindex strings @subentry null
 In this case, the first field is null, or empty.
 
 The stripping of leading and trailing whitespace also comes into
@@ -7234,9 +7259,9 @@ Because the leading whitespace was ignored when finding 
@code{$1},
 it is not part of the new @code{$0}.  Finally, the last @code{print}
 statement prints the new @code{$0}.
 
-@cindex @code{FS}, containing @code{^}
-@cindex @code{^} (caret), in @code{FS}
-@cindex dark corner, @code{^}, in @code{FS}
+@cindex @code{FS} variable @subentry containing @code{^}
+@cindex @code{^} (caret) @subentry in @code{FS}
+@cindex dark corner @subentry @code{^}, in @code{FS}
 There is an additional subtlety to be aware of when using regular expressions
 for field splitting.
 It is not well specified in the POSIX standard, or anywhere else, what @samp{^}
@@ -7264,11 +7289,11 @@ $ @kbd{echo 'xxAA  xxBxx  C' |}
 @node Single Character Fields
 @subsection Making Each Character a Separate Field
 
-@cindex common extensions, single character fields
-@cindex extensions, common@comma{} single character fields
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, single-character 
fields
+@cindex common extensions @subentry single character fields
+@cindex extensions @subentry common @subentry single character fields
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry 
single-character fields
 @cindex single-character fields
-@cindex fields, single-character
+@cindex fields @subentry single-character
 There are times when you may want to examine each character
 of a record separately.  This can be done in @command{gawk} by
 simply assigning the null string (@code{""}) to @code{FS}. @value{COMMONEXT}
@@ -7287,8 +7312,8 @@ $ @kbd{echo a b | gawk 'BEGIN @{ FS = "" @}}
 @print{} Field 3 is b
 @end example
 
-@cindex dark corner, @code{FS} as null string
-@cindex @code{FS} variable, as null string
+@cindex dark corner @subentry @code{FS} as null string
+@cindex @code{FS} variable @subentry null string as
 Traditionally, the behavior of @code{FS} equal to @code{""} was not defined.
 In this case, most versions of Unix @command{awk} simply treat the entire 
record
 as only having one field.
@@ -7300,10 +7325,10 @@ behaves this way.
 
 @node Command Line Field Separator
 @subsection Setting @code{FS} from the Command Line
-@cindex @option{-F} option, command-line
-@cindex field separator, on command line
-@cindex command line, @code{FS} on@comma{} setting
-@cindex @code{FS} variable, setting from command line
+@cindex @option{-F} option @subentry command-line
+@cindex field separator @subentry on command line
+@cindex command line @subentry @code{FS} on, setting
+@cindex @code{FS} variable @subentry setting from command line
 
 @code{FS} can be set on the command line.  Use the @option{-F} option to
 do so.  For example:
@@ -7329,9 +7354,9 @@ awk -F\\\\ '@dots{}' files @dots{}
 @end example
 
 @noindent
-@cindex field separator, backslash (@code{\}) as
-@cindex @code{\} (backslash), as field separator
-@cindex backslash (@code{\}), as field separator
+@cindex field separator @subentry backslash (@code{\}) as
+@cindex @code{\} (backslash) @subentry as field separator
+@cindex backslash (@code{\}) @subentry as field separator
 Because @samp{\} is used for quoting in the shell, @command{awk} sees
 @samp{-F\\}.  Then @command{awk} processes the @samp{\\} for escape
 characters (@pxref{Escape Sequences}), finally yielding
@@ -7381,7 +7406,7 @@ separator, instead of the @samp{-} in the phone number 
that was
 originally intended.  This demonstrates why you have to be careful in
 choosing your field and record separators.
 
-@cindex Unix @command{awk}, password files@comma{} field separators and
+@cindex Unix @command{awk} @subentry password files, field separators and
 Perhaps the most common use of a single character as the field separator
 occurs when processing the Unix system password file.  On many Unix
 systems, each user has a separate entry in the system password file, with one
@@ -7391,7 +7416,7 @@ encrypted or shadow password.  (A shadow password is 
indicated by the
 presence of a single @samp{x} in the second field.)  A password file
 entry might look like this:
 
-@cindex Robbins, Arnold
+@cindex Robbins @subentry Arnold
 @example
 arnold:x:2076:10:Arnold Robbins:/home/arnold:/bin/bash
 @end example
@@ -7420,15 +7445,15 @@ When you do this, @code{$1} is the same as @code{$0}.
 
 @sidebar Changing @code{FS} Does Not Affect the Fields
 
-@cindex POSIX @command{awk}, field separators and
-@cindex field separator, POSIX and
+@cindex POSIX @command{awk} @subentry field separators and
+@cindex field separator @subentry POSIX and
 According to the POSIX standard, @command{awk} is supposed to behave
 as if each record is split into fields at the time it is read.
 In particular, this means that if you change the value of @code{FS}
 after a record is read, the values of the fields (i.e., how they were split)
 should reflect the old value of @code{FS}, not the new one.
 
-@cindex dark corner, field separators
+@cindex dark corner @subentry field separators
 @cindex @command{sed} utility
 @cindex stream editors
 However, many older implementations of @command{awk} do not work this way.  
Instead,
@@ -7528,7 +7553,7 @@ will take effect.
 
 @cindex data, fixed-width
 @cindex fixed-width data
-@cindex advanced features, fixed-width data
+@cindex advanced features @subentry fixed-width data
 
 @c O'Reilly doesn't like it as a note the first thing in the section.
 This @value{SECTION} discusses an advanced
@@ -7561,10 +7586,10 @@ on @code{FS} does not work well in this case.  Although 
a portable
 @code{$0} (@pxref{String Functions}), this is awkward and inefficient
 for a large number of fields.
 
-@cindex troubleshooting, fatal errors, field widths@comma{} specifying
+@cindex troubleshooting @subentry fatal errors @subentry field widths, 
specifying
 @cindex @command{w} utility
 @cindex @code{FIELDWIDTHS} variable
-@cindex @command{gawk}, @code{FIELDWIDTHS} variable in
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry @code{FIELDWIDTHS} variable in
 The splitting of an input record into fixed-width fields is specified by
 assigning a string containing space-separated numbers to the built-in
 variable @code{FIELDWIDTHS}.  Each number specifies the width of the
@@ -7734,7 +7759,7 @@ This @value{SECTION} discusses an advanced
 feature of @command{gawk}.  If you are a novice @command{awk} user,
 you might want to skip it on the first reading.
 
-@cindex advanced features, specifying field content
+@cindex advanced features @subentry specifying field content
 Normally, when using @code{FS}, @command{gawk} defines the fields as the
 parts of the record that occur in between each field separator. In other
 words, @code{FS} defines what a field @emph{is not}, instead of what a field
@@ -7760,7 +7785,7 @@ Robbins,Arnold,"1234 A Pretty Street, 
NE",MyTown,MyState,12345-6789,USA
 @c endfile
 @end example
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, @code{FPAT} variable in
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry @code{FPAT} variable in
 @cindex @code{FPAT} variable
 The @code{FPAT} variable offers a solution for cases like this.
 The value of @code{FPAT} should be a string that provides a regular expression.
@@ -7858,7 +7883,7 @@ available for splitting regular strings (@pxref{String 
Functions}).
 @node Testing field creation
 @section Checking How @command{gawk} Is Splitting Records
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, splitting fields and
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry splitting fields and
 As we've seen, @command{gawk} provides three independent methods to split
 input records into fields.  The mechanism used is based on which of the
 three variables---@code{FS}, @code{FIELDWIDTHS}, or @code{FPAT}---was
@@ -7897,15 +7922,15 @@ example of such a function).
 @section Multiple-Line Records
 
 @cindex multiple-line records
-@cindex records, multiline
-@cindex input, multiline records
-@cindex files, reading, multiline records
-@cindex input, files, See input files
+@cindex records @subentry multiline
+@cindex input @subentry multiline records
+@cindex files @subentry reading @subentry multiline records
+@cindex input, files @seeentry{input files}
 In some databases, a single line cannot conveniently hold all the
 information in one entry.  In such cases, you can use multiline
 records.  The first step in doing this is to choose your data format.
 
-@cindex record separators, with multiline records
+@cindex record separators @subentry with multiline records
 One technique is to use an unusual character or string to separate
 records.  For example, you could use the formfeed character (written
 @samp{\f} in @command{awk}, as in C) to separate them, making each record
@@ -7914,7 +7939,7 @@ a page of the file.  To do this, just set the variable 
@code{RS} to
 other character could equally well be used, as long as it won't be part
 of the data in a record.
 
-@cindex @code{RS} variable, multiline records and
+@cindex @code{RS} variable @subentry multiline records and
 Another technique is to have blank lines separate records.  By a special
 dispensation, an empty string as the value of @code{RS} indicates that
 records are separated by one or more blank lines.  When @code{RS} is set
@@ -7926,7 +7951,7 @@ all act as one record separator.
 whitespace do not count.)
 
 @cindex leftmost longest match
-@cindex matching, leftmost longest
+@cindex matching @subentry leftmost longest
 You can achieve the same effect as @samp{RS = ""} by assigning the
 string @code{"\n\n+"} to @code{RS}. This regexp matches the newline
 at the end of the record and one or more blank lines after the record.
@@ -7937,7 +7962,7 @@ So, the next record doesn't start until
 the first nonblank line that follows---no matter how many blank lines
 appear in a row, they are considered one record separator.
 
-@cindex dark corner, multiline records
+@cindex dark corner @subentry multiline records
 However, there is an important difference between @samp{RS = ""} and
 @samp{RS = "\n\n+"}. In the first case, leading newlines in the input
 @value{DF} are ignored, and if a file ends without extra blank lines
@@ -7945,8 +7970,8 @@ after the last record, the final newline is removed from 
the record.
 In the second case, this special processing is not done.
 @value{DARKCORNER}
 
-@cindex field separator, in multiline records
-@cindex @code{FS}, in multiline records
+@cindex field separator @subentry in multiline records
+@cindex @code{FS} variable @subentry in multiline records
 Now that the input is separated into records, the second step is to
 separate the fields in the records.  One way to do this is to divide each
 of the lines into fields in the normal manner.  This happens by default
@@ -8069,9 +8094,9 @@ Leading and trailing matches of @var{regexp} delimit 
empty records.
 POSIX standard.)
 @end table
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, @code{RT} variable in
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry @code{RT} variable in
 @cindex @code{RT} variable
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, @code{RS}/@code{RT} 
variables
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry 
@code{RS}/@code{RT} variables
 If not in compatibility mode (@pxref{Options}), @command{gawk} sets
 @code{RT} to the input text that matched the value specified by @code{RS}.
 But if the input file ended without any text that matches @code{RS},
@@ -8080,8 +8105,8 @@ then @command{gawk} sets @code{RT} to the null string.
 @node Getline
 @section Explicit Input with @code{getline}
 
-@cindex @code{getline} command, explicit input with
-@cindex input, explicit
+@cindex @code{getline} command @subentry explicit input with
+@cindex input @subentry explicit
 So far we have been getting our input data from @command{awk}'s main
 input stream---either the standard input (usually your keyboard, sometimes
 the output from another program) or the
@@ -8108,11 +8133,11 @@ Parts I and II
 @end ifnotinfo
 and have a good knowledge of how @command{awk} works.
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, @code{ERRNO} variable in
-@cindex @code{ERRNO} variable, with @command{getline} command
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, @code{getline} command
-@cindex @code{getline} command, return values
-@cindex @option{--sandbox} option, input redirection with @code{getline}
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry @code{ERRNO} variable in
+@cindex @code{ERRNO} variable @subentry with @command{getline} command
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry 
@code{getline} command
+@cindex @code{getline} command @subentry return values
+@cindex @option{--sandbox} option @subentry input redirection with 
@code{getline}
 
 The @code{getline} command returns 1 if it finds a record and 0 if
 it encounters the end of the file.  If there is some error in getting
@@ -8235,8 +8260,8 @@ rule in the program.  @xref{Next Statement}.
 
 @node Getline/Variable
 @subsection Using @code{getline} into a Variable
-@cindex @code{getline} into a variable
-@cindex variables, @code{getline} command into@comma{} using
+@cindex @code{getline} command @subentry into a variable
+@cindex variables @subentry @code{getline} command into, using
 
 You can use @samp{getline @var{var}} to read the next record from
 @command{awk}'s input into the variable @var{var}.  No other processing is
@@ -8289,12 +8314,12 @@ the value of @code{NF} do not change.
 @node Getline/File
 @subsection Using @code{getline} from a File
 
-@cindex @code{getline} from a file
+@cindex @code{getline} command @subentry from a file
 @cindex input redirection
-@cindex redirection of input
-@cindex @code{<} (left angle bracket), @code{<} operator (I/O)
-@cindex left angle bracket (@code{<}), @code{<} operator (I/O)
-@cindex operators, input/output
+@cindex redirection @subentry of input
+@cindex @code{<} (left angle bracket) @subentry @code{<} operator (I/O)
+@cindex left angle bracket (@code{<}) @subentry @code{<} operator (I/O)
+@cindex operators @subentry input/output
 Use @samp{getline < @var{file}} to read the next record from @var{file}.
 Here, @var{file} is a string-valued expression that
 specifies the @value{FN}.  @samp{< @var{file}} is called a @dfn{redirection}
@@ -8320,7 +8345,7 @@ the normal manner, so the values of @code{$0} and the 
other fields are
 changed, resulting in a new value of @code{NF}.
 @code{RT} is also set.
 
-@cindex POSIX @command{awk}, @code{<} operator and
+@cindex POSIX @command{awk} @subentry @code{<} operator and
 @c Thanks to Paul Eggert for initial wording here
 According to POSIX, @samp{getline < @var{expression}} is ambiguous if
 @var{expression} contains unparenthesized operators other than
@@ -8331,7 +8356,7 @@ you want your program to be portable to all @command{awk} 
implementations.
 
 @node Getline/Variable/File
 @subsection Using @code{getline} into a Variable from a File
-@cindex variables, @code{getline} command into@comma{} using
+@cindex variables @subentry @code{getline} command into, using
 
 Use @samp{getline @var{var} < @var{file}} to read input
 from the file
@@ -8385,11 +8410,11 @@ Failing that, attention to details would be useful.}
 @author Brian Kernighan
 @end quotation
 
-@cindex @code{|} (vertical bar), @code{|} operator (I/O)
-@cindex vertical bar (@code{|}), @code{|} operator (I/O)
+@cindex @code{|} (vertical bar) @subentry @code{|} operator (I/O)
+@cindex vertical bar (@code{|}) @subentry @code{|} operator (I/O)
 @cindex input pipeline
-@cindex pipe, input
-@cindex operators, input/output
+@cindex pipe @subentry input
+@cindex operators @subentry input/output
 The output of a command can also be piped into @code{getline}, using
 @samp{@var{command} | getline}.  In
 this case, the string @var{command} is run as a shell command and its output
@@ -8436,9 +8461,9 @@ bletch
 @noindent
 the program might produce:
 
-@cindex Robbins, Bill
-@cindex Robbins, Miriam
-@cindex Robbins, Arnold
+@cindex Robbins @subentry Bill
+@cindex Robbins @subentry Miriam
+@cindex Robbins @subentry Arnold
 @example
 foo
 bar
@@ -8459,7 +8484,7 @@ value of @code{NF}, and recomputes the value of 
@code{$0}.  The values of
 @code{NR} and @code{FNR} are not changed.
 @code{RT} is set.
 
-@cindex POSIX @command{awk}, @code{|} I/O operator and
+@cindex POSIX @command{awk} @subentry @code{|} I/O operator and
 @c Thanks to Paul Eggert for initial wording here
 According to POSIX, @samp{@var{expression} | getline} is ambiguous if
 @var{expression} contains unparenthesized operators other than
@@ -8485,7 +8510,7 @@ have to worry.
 
 @node Getline/Variable/Pipe
 @subsection Using @code{getline} into a Variable from a Pipe
-@cindex variables, @code{getline} command into@comma{} using
+@cindex variables @subentry @code{getline} command into, using
 
 When you use @samp{@var{command} | getline @var{var}}, the
 output of @var{command} is sent through a pipe to
@@ -8517,12 +8542,12 @@ program to be portable to other @command{awk} 
implementations.
 
 @node Getline/Coprocess
 @subsection Using @code{getline} from a Coprocess
-@cindex coprocesses, @code{getline} from
-@cindex @code{getline} command, coprocesses@comma{} using from
-@cindex @code{|} (vertical bar), @code{|&} operator (I/O)
-@cindex vertical bar (@code{|}), @code{|&} operator (I/O)
-@cindex operators, input/output
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, input/output operators
+@cindex coprocesses @subentry @code{getline} from
+@cindex @code{getline} command @subentry coprocesses, using from
+@cindex @code{|} (vertical bar) @subentry @code{|&} operator (I/O)
+@cindex vertical bar (@code{|}) @subentry @code{|&} operator (I/O)
+@cindex operators @subentry input/output
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry input/output 
operators
 
 Reading input into @code{getline} from a pipe is a one-way operation.
 The command that is started with @samp{@var{command} | getline} only
@@ -8558,7 +8583,7 @@ where coprocesses are discussed in more detail.
 
 @node Getline/Variable/Coprocess
 @subsection Using @code{getline} into a Variable from a Coprocess
-@cindex variables, @code{getline} command into@comma{} using
+@cindex variables @subentry @code{getline} command into, using
 
 When you use @samp{@var{command} |& getline @var{var}}, the output from
 the coprocess @var{command} is sent through a two-way pipe to @code{getline}
@@ -8588,21 +8613,21 @@ When @code{getline} changes the value of @code{$0} and 
@code{NF},
 program and start testing the new record against every pattern.
 However, the new record is tested against any subsequent rules.
 
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, implementation 
limitations
-@cindex implementation issues, @command{gawk}, limits
-@cindex @command{awk}, implementations, limits
-@cindex @command{gawk}, implementation issues, limits
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry 
implementation limitations
+@cindex implementation issues, @command{gawk} @subentry limits
+@cindex @command{awk} @subentry implementations @subentry limits
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry implementation issues @subentry limits
 @item
 Some very old @command{awk} implementations limit the number of pipelines that 
an @command{awk}
 program may have open to just one.  In @command{gawk}, there is no such limit.
 You can open as many pipelines (and coprocesses) as the underlying operating
 system permits.
 
-@cindex side effects, @code{FILENAME} variable
-@cindex @code{FILENAME} variable, @code{getline}@comma{} setting with
-@cindex dark corner, @code{FILENAME} variable
-@cindex @code{getline} command, @code{FILENAME} variable and
-@cindex @code{BEGIN} pattern, @code{getline} and
+@cindex side effects @subentry @code{FILENAME} variable
+@cindex @code{FILENAME} variable @subentry @code{getline}, setting with
+@cindex dark corner @subentry @code{FILENAME} variable
+@cindex @code{getline} command @subentry @code{FILENAME} variable and
+@cindex @code{BEGIN} pattern @subentry @code{getline} and
 @item
 An interesting side effect occurs if you use @code{getline} without a
 redirection inside a @code{BEGIN} rule. Because an unredirected @code{getline}
@@ -8669,7 +8694,7 @@ know that there is a string value to be assigned.
 
 @node Getline Summary
 @subsection Summary of @code{getline} Variants
-@cindex @code{getline} command, variants
+@cindex @code{getline} command @subentry variants
 
 @ref{table-getline-variants}
 summarizes the eight variants of @code{getline},
@@ -8696,7 +8721,7 @@ Note: for each variant, @command{gawk} sets the @code{RT} 
predefined variable.
 @section Reading Input with a Timeout
 @cindex timeout, reading input
 
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, read timeouts
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry read timeouts
 This @value{SECTION} describes a feature that is specific to @command{gawk}.
 
 You may specify a timeout in milliseconds for reading input from the keyboard,
@@ -8780,6 +8805,8 @@ worth of data the first time. Because of this, changing 
the value
 of timeout like in the preceding example is not very useful.
 @end quotation
 
+@cindex @env{GAWK_READ_TIMEOUT} environment variable
+@cindex environment variables @subentry @env{GAWK_READ_TIMEOUT}
 If the @code{PROCINFO} element is not present and the
 @env{GAWK_READ_TIMEOUT} environment variable exists,
 @command{gawk} uses its value to initialize the timeout value.
@@ -8806,7 +8833,7 @@ indefinitely until some other process opens it for 
writing.
 @section Retrying Reads After Certain Input Errors
 @cindex retrying input
 
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, retrying input
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry retrying 
input
 This @value{SECTION} describes a feature that is specific to @command{gawk}.
 
 When @command{gawk} encounters an error while reading input, by
@@ -8834,9 +8861,9 @@ descriptor has been configured to behave in a 
non-blocking fashion.
 
 @node Command-line directories
 @section Directories on the Command Line
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, command-line 
directories
-@cindex directories, command-line
-@cindex command line, directories on
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry command-line 
directories
+@cindex directories @subentry command-line
+@cindex command line @subentry directories on
 
 According to the POSIX standard, files named on the @command{awk}
 command line must be text files; it is a fatal error if they are not.
@@ -8927,6 +8954,7 @@ from the default input stream, from a file, or from a 
pipe or coprocess.
 Use @code{PROCINFO[@var{file}, "READ_TIMEOUT"]} to cause reads to time out
 for @var{file}.
 
+@cindex POSIX mode
 @item
 Directories on the command line are fatal for standard @command{awk};
 @command{gawk} ignores them if not in POSIX mode.
@@ -8952,7 +8980,7 @@ including abstentions, for each item.
 @chapter Printing Output
 
 @cindex printing
-@cindex output, printing, See printing
+@cindex output, printing @seeentry{printing}
 One of the most common programming actions is to @dfn{print}, or output,
 some or all of the input.  Use the @code{print} statement
 for simple output, and the @code{printf} statement
@@ -9013,8 +9041,8 @@ The items to print can be constant strings or numbers, 
fields of the
 current record (such as @code{$1}), variables, or any @command{awk}
 expression.  Numeric values are converted to strings and then printed.
 
-@cindex records, printing
-@cindex lines, blank, printing
+@cindex records @subentry printing
+@cindex lines @subentry blank, printing
 @cindex text, printing
 The simple statement @samp{print} with no items is equivalent to
 @samp{print $0}: it prints the entire current record.  To print a blank
@@ -9037,7 +9065,7 @@ isn't limited to only one line.  If an item value is a 
string containing a
 newline, the newline is output along with the rest of the string.  A
 single @code{print} statement can make any number of lines this way.
 
-@cindex newlines, printing
+@cindex newlines @subentry printing
 The following is an example of printing a string that contains embedded
 @ifinfo
 newlines
@@ -9064,7 +9092,7 @@ $ @kbd{awk 'BEGIN @{ print "line one\nline two\nline 
three" @}'}
 @end group
 @end example
 
-@cindex fields, printing
+@cindex fields @subentry printing
 The next example, which is run on the @file{inventory-shipped} file,
 prints the first two fields of each input record, with a space between
 them:
@@ -9077,8 +9105,8 @@ $ @kbd{awk '@{ print $1, $2 @}' inventory-shipped}
 @dots{}
 @end example
 
-@cindex @code{print} statement, commas, omitting
-@cindex troubleshooting, @code{print} statement@comma{} omitting commas
+@cindex @code{print} statement @subentry commas, omitting
+@cindex troubleshooting @subentry @code{print} statement, omitting commas
 A common mistake in using the @code{print} statement is to omit the comma
 between two items.  This often has the effect of making the items run
 together in the output, with no space.  The reason for this is that
@@ -9093,7 +9121,7 @@ $ @kbd{awk '@{ print $1 $2 @}' inventory-shipped}
 @dots{}
 @end example
 
-@cindex @code{BEGIN} pattern, headings@comma{} adding
+@cindex @code{BEGIN} pattern @subentry headings, adding
 To someone unfamiliar with the @file{inventory-shipped} file, neither
 example's output makes much sense.  A heading line at the beginning
 would make it clearer.  Let's add some headings to our table of months
@@ -9132,8 +9160,8 @@ awk 'BEGIN @{ print "Month Crates"
 @end group
 @end example
 
-@cindex @code{printf} statement, columns@comma{} aligning
-@cindex columns, aligning
+@cindex @code{printf} statement @subentry columns, aligning
+@cindex columns @subentry aligning
 Lining up columns this way can get pretty
 complicated when there are many columns to fix.  Counting spaces for two
 or three columns is simple, but any more than this can take up
@@ -9141,8 +9169,8 @@ a lot of time. This is why the @code{printf} statement was
 created (@pxref{Printf});
 one of its specialties is lining up columns of data.
 
-@cindex line continuations, in @code{print} statement
-@cindex @code{print} statement, line continuations and
+@cindex line continuations @subentry in @code{print} statement
+@cindex @code{print} statement @subentry line continuations and
 @quotation NOTE
 You can continue either a @code{print} or
 @code{printf} statement simply by putting a newline after any comma
@@ -9168,10 +9196,10 @@ then outputs a string called the @dfn{output record 
separator} (or
 (i.e., a newline character).  Thus, each @code{print} statement normally
 makes a separate line.
 
-@cindex output, records
-@cindex output record separator, See @code{ORS} variable
+@cindex output @subentry records
+@cindex output record separator @seeentry{@code{ORS} variable}
 @cindex @code{ORS} variable
-@cindex @code{BEGIN} pattern, @code{OFS}/@code{ORS} variables, assigning 
values to
+@cindex @code{BEGIN} pattern @subentry @code{OFS}/@code{ORS} variables, 
assigning values to
 In order to change how output fields and records are separated, assign
 new values to the variables @code{OFS} and @code{ORS}.  The usual
 place to do this is in the @code{BEGIN} rule
@@ -9217,8 +9245,8 @@ runs together on a single line.
 
 @node OFMT
 @section Controlling Numeric Output with @code{print}
-@cindex numeric, output format
-@cindex formats@comma{} numeric output
+@cindex numeric @subentry output format
+@cindex formats, numeric output
 When printing numeric values with the @code{print} statement,
 @command{awk} internally converts each number to a string of characters
 and prints that string.  @command{awk} uses the @code{sprintf()} function
@@ -9233,7 +9261,7 @@ more fully in
 
 @cindexawkfunc{sprintf}
 @cindex @code{OFMT} variable
-@cindex output, format specifier@comma{} @code{OFMT}
+@cindex output @subentry format specifier, @code{OFMT}
 The predefined variable @code{OFMT} contains the format specification
 that @code{print} uses with @code{sprintf()} when it wants to convert a
 number to a string for printing.
@@ -9250,9 +9278,9 @@ $ @kbd{awk 'BEGIN @{}
 @end example
 
 @noindent
-@cindex dark corner, @code{OFMT} variable
-@cindex POSIX @command{awk}, @code{OFMT} variable and
-@cindex @code{OFMT} variable, POSIX @command{awk} and
+@cindex dark corner @subentry @code{OFMT} variable
+@cindex POSIX @command{awk} @subentry @code{OFMT} variable and
+@cindex @code{OFMT} variable @subentry POSIX @command{awk} and
 According to the POSIX standard, @command{awk}'s behavior is undefined
 if @code{OFMT} contains anything but a floating-point conversion specification.
 @value{DARKCORNER}
@@ -9261,8 +9289,8 @@ if @code{OFMT} contains anything but a floating-point 
conversion specification.
 @section Using @code{printf} Statements for Fancier Printing
 
 @cindex @code{printf} statement
-@cindex output, formatted
-@cindex formatting output
+@cindex output @subentry formatted
+@cindex formatting @subentry output
 For more precise control over the output format than what is
 provided by @code{print}, use @code{printf}.
 With @code{printf} you can
@@ -9281,7 +9309,7 @@ after the decimal point).
 @node Basic Printf
 @subsection Introduction to the @code{printf} Statement
 
-@cindex @code{printf} statement, syntax of
+@cindex @code{printf} statement @subentry syntax of
 A simple @code{printf} statement looks like this:
 
 @example
@@ -9329,8 +9357,8 @@ the output message.
 
 @node Control Letters
 @subsection Format-Control Letters
-@cindex @code{printf} statement, format-control characters
-@cindex format specifiers, @code{printf} statement
+@cindex @code{printf} statement @subentry format-control characters
+@cindex format specifiers @subentry @code{printf} statement
 
 A format specifier starts with the character @samp{%} and ends with
 a @dfn{format-control letter}---it tells the @code{printf} statement
@@ -9365,8 +9393,8 @@ Print a number as a character; thus, @samp{printf "%c",
 65} outputs the letter @samp{A}. The output for a string value is
 the first character of the string.
 
-@cindex dark corner, format-control characters
-@cindex @command{gawk}, format-control characters
+@cindex dark corner @subentry format-control characters
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry format-control characters
 @quotation NOTE
 The POSIX standard says the first character of a string is printed.
 In locales with multibyte characters, @command{gawk} attempts to
@@ -9464,8 +9492,8 @@ This does not consume an
 argument and it ignores any modifiers.
 @end table
 
-@cindex dark corner, format-control characters
-@cindex @command{gawk}, format-control characters
+@cindex dark corner @subentry format-control characters
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry format-control characters
 @quotation NOTE
 When using the integer format-control letters for values that are
 outside the range of the widest C integer type, @command{gawk} switches to
@@ -9490,8 +9518,8 @@ the IEEE standard.  Further details are provided in
 @node Format Modifiers
 @subsection Modifiers for @code{printf} Formats
 
-@cindex @code{printf} statement, modifiers
-@cindex modifiers@comma{} in format specifiers
+@cindex @code{printf} statement @subentry modifiers
+@cindex modifiers, in format specifiers
 A format specification can also include @dfn{modifiers} that can control
 how much of the item's value is printed, as well as how much space it gets.
 The modifiers come between the @samp{%} and the format-control letter.
@@ -9501,8 +9529,8 @@ spaces in the output. Here are the possible modifiers, in 
the order in
 which they may appear:
 
 @table @asis
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, 
@code{print}/@code{printf} statements
-@cindex @code{printf} statement, positional specifiers
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry 
@code{print}/@code{printf} statements
+@cindex @code{printf} statement @subentry positional specifiers
 @c the code{} does NOT start a secondary
 @cindex positional specifiers, @code{printf} statement
 @item @code{@var{N}$}
@@ -9687,8 +9715,8 @@ printf "%" w "." p "s\n", s
 This is not particularly easy to read, but it does work.
 
 @c @cindex lint checks
-@cindex troubleshooting, fatal errors, @code{printf} format strings
-@cindex POSIX @command{awk}, @code{printf} format strings and
+@cindex troubleshooting @subentry fatal errors @subentry @code{printf} format 
strings
+@cindex POSIX @command{awk} @subentry @code{printf} format strings and
 C programmers may be used to supplying additional modifiers (@samp{h},
 @samp{j}, @samp{l}, @samp{L}, @samp{t}, and @samp{z}) in @code{printf}
 format strings. These are not valid in @command{awk}.  Most @command{awk}
@@ -9780,8 +9808,8 @@ awk 'BEGIN @{ format = "%-10s %s\n"
 @section Redirecting Output of @code{print} and @code{printf}
 
 @cindex output redirection
-@cindex redirection of output
-@cindex @option{--sandbox} option, output redirection with @code{print}, 
@code{printf}
+@cindex redirection @subentry of output
+@cindex @option{--sandbox} option @subentry output redirection with 
@code{print} @subentry @code{printf}
 So far, the output from @code{print} and @code{printf} has gone
 to the standard
 output, usually the screen.  Both @code{print} and @code{printf} can
@@ -9798,17 +9826,17 @@ Redirections in @command{awk} are written just like 
redirections in shell
 commands, except that they are written inside the @command{awk} program.
 
 @c the commas here are part of the see also
-@cindex @code{print} statement, See Also redirection@comma{} of output
-@cindex @code{printf} statement, See Also redirection@comma{} of output
+@cindex @code{print} statement @seealso{redirection of output}
+@cindex @code{printf} statement @seealso{redirection of output}
 There are four forms of output redirection: output to a file, output
 appended to a file, output through a pipe to another command, and output
 to a coprocess.  We show them all for the @code{print} statement,
 but they work identically for @code{printf}:
 
 @table @code
-@cindex @code{>} (right angle bracket), @code{>} operator (I/O)
-@cindex right angle bracket (@code{>}), @code{>} operator (I/O)
-@cindex operators, input/output
+@cindex @code{>} (right angle bracket) @subentry @code{>} operator (I/O)
+@cindex right angle bracket (@code{>}) @subentry @code{>} operator (I/O)
+@cindex operators @subentry input/output
 @item print @var{items} > @var{output-file}
 This redirection prints the items into the output file named
 @var{output-file}.  The @value{FN} @var{output-file} can be any
@@ -9840,8 +9868,8 @@ $ @kbd{cat name-list}
 @noindent
 Each output file contains one name or number per line.
 
-@cindex @code{>} (right angle bracket), @code{>>} operator (I/O)
-@cindex right angle bracket (@code{>}), @code{>>} operator (I/O)
+@cindex @code{>} (right angle bracket) @subentry @code{>>} operator (I/O)
+@cindex right angle bracket (@code{>}) @subentry @code{>>} operator (I/O)
 @item print @var{items} >> @var{output-file}
 This redirection prints the items into the preexisting output file
 named @var{output-file}.  The difference between this and the
@@ -9850,9 +9878,9 @@ single-@samp{>} redirection is that the old contents (if 
any) of
 appended to the file.
 If @var{output-file} does not exist, then it is created.
 
-@cindex @code{|} (vertical bar), @code{|} operator (I/O)
-@cindex pipe, output
-@cindex output, pipes
+@cindex @code{|} (vertical bar) @subentry @code{|} operator (I/O)
+@cindex pipe @subentry output
+@cindex output @subentry pipes
 @item print @var{items} | @var{command}
 It is possible to send output to another program through a pipe
 instead of into a file.   This redirection opens a pipe to
@@ -9907,9 +9935,9 @@ because (if you mean to refer to that same file or 
command)
 every time.
 
 @cindex coprocesses
-@cindex @code{|} (vertical bar), @code{|&} operator (I/O)
-@cindex operators, input/output
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, input/output operators
+@cindex @code{|} (vertical bar) @subentry @code{|&} operator (I/O)
+@cindex operators @subentry input/output
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry input/output 
operators
 @item print @var{items} |& @var{command}
 This redirection prints the items to the input of @var{command}.
 The difference between this and the
@@ -9939,7 +9967,7 @@ asks the system to open a file, pipe, or coprocess only 
if the particular
 @var{file} or @var{command} you specify has not already been written
 to by your program or if it has been closed since it was last written to.
 
-@cindex troubleshooting, printing
+@cindex troubleshooting @subentry printing
 It is a common error to use @samp{>} redirection for the first @code{print}
 to a file, and then to use @samp{>>} for subsequent output:
 
@@ -9960,10 +9988,10 @@ output is produced in the expected order. However, 
mixing the operators
 for the same file is definitely poor style, and is confusing to readers
 of your program.)
 
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, implementation 
limitations
-@cindex implementation issues, @command{gawk}, limits
-@cindex @command{awk}, implementation issues, pipes
-@cindex @command{gawk}, implementation issues, pipes
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry 
implementation limitations
+@cindex implementation issues, @command{gawk} @subentry limits
+@cindex @command{awk} @subentry implementation issues @subentry pipes
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry implementation issues @subentry pipes
 @ifnotinfo
 As mentioned earlier
 (@pxref{Getline Notes}),
@@ -9981,7 +10009,7 @@ program may have open to just one!  In @command{gawk}, 
there is no such limit.
 open as many pipelines as the underlying operating system permits.
 
 @sidebar Piping into @command{sh}
-@cindex shells, piping commands into
+@cindex shells @subentry piping commands into
 
 A particularly powerful way to use redirection is to build command lines
 and pipe them into the shell, @command{sh}.  For example, suppose you
@@ -10010,13 +10038,13 @@ command lines to be fed to the shell.
 @node Special FD
 @section Special Files for Standard Preopened Data Streams
 @cindex standard input
-@cindex input, standard
+@cindex input @subentry standard
 @cindex standard output
-@cindex output, standard
+@cindex output @subentry standard
 @cindex error output
 @cindex standard error
 @cindex file descriptors
-@cindex files, descriptors, See file descriptors
+@cindex files @subentry descriptors @seeentry{file descriptors}
 
 Running programs conventionally have three input and output streams
 already available to them for reading and writing.  These are known
@@ -10031,7 +10059,7 @@ is typically used for writing error messages; the 
reason there are two separate
 streams, standard output and standard error, is so that they can be
 redirected separately.
 
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, error messages
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry error 
messages
 @cindex error handling
 In traditional implementations of @command{awk}, the only way to write an error
 message to standard error in an @command{awk} program is as follows:
@@ -10074,15 +10102,15 @@ the descriptor that the @value{FN} stands for.  These 
special
 @value{FN}s work for all operating systems that @command{gawk}
 has been ported to, not just those that are POSIX-compliant:
 
-@cindex common extensions, @code{/dev/stdin} special file
-@cindex common extensions, @code{/dev/stdout} special file
-@cindex common extensions, @code{/dev/stderr} special file
-@cindex extensions, common@comma{} @code{/dev/stdin} special file
-@cindex extensions, common@comma{} @code{/dev/stdout} special file
-@cindex extensions, common@comma{} @code{/dev/stderr} special file
-@cindex file names, standard streams in @command{gawk}
+@cindex common extensions @subentry @code{/dev/stdin} special file
+@cindex common extensions @subentry @code{/dev/stdout} special file
+@cindex common extensions @subentry @code{/dev/stderr} special file
+@cindex extensions @subentry common @subentry @code{/dev/stdin} special file
+@cindex extensions @subentry common @subentry @code{/dev/stdout} special file
+@cindex extensions @subentry common @subentry @code{/dev/stderr} special file
+@cindex file names @subentry standard streams in @command{gawk}
 @cindex @code{/dev/@dots{}} special files
-@cindex files, @code{/dev/@dots{}} special files
+@cindex files @subentry @code{/dev/@dots{}} special files
 @cindex @code{/dev/fd/@var{N}} special files (@command{gawk})
 @table @file
 @item /dev/stdin
@@ -10102,7 +10130,7 @@ the proper way to write an error message then becomes:
 print "Serious error detected!" > "/dev/stderr"
 @end example
 
-@cindex troubleshooting, quotes with file names
+@cindex troubleshooting @subentry quotes with file names
 Note the use of quotes around the @value{FN}.
 Like with any other redirection, the value must be a string.
 It is a common error to omit the quotes, which leads
@@ -10115,7 +10143,7 @@ invoked with the @option{--traditional} option 
(@pxref{Options}).
 
 @node Special Files
 @section Special @value{FFN}s in @command{gawk}
-@cindex @command{gawk}, file names in
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry file names in
 
 Besides access to standard input, standard output, and standard error,
 @command{gawk} provides access to any open file descriptor.
@@ -10154,8 +10182,8 @@ above two, does actually close the given file 
descriptor.
 
 @node Special Network
 @subsection Special Files for Network Communications
-@cindex networks, support for
-@cindex TCP/IP, support for
+@cindex networks @subentry support for
+@cindex TCP/IP @subentry support for
 
 @command{gawk} programs
 can open a two-way
@@ -10184,8 +10212,9 @@ Here are some things to bear in mind when using the
 special @value{FN}s that @command{gawk} provides:
 
 @itemize @value{BULLET}
-@cindex compatibility mode (@command{gawk}), file names
-@cindex file names, in compatibility mode
+@cindex compatibility mode (@command{gawk}) @subentry file names
+@cindex file names @subentry in compatibility mode
+@cindex POSIX mode
 @item
 Recognition of the @value{FN}s for the three standard preopened
 files is disabled only in POSIX mode.
@@ -10208,12 +10237,12 @@ Doing so results in unpredictable behavior.
 
 @node Close Files And Pipes
 @section Closing Input and Output Redirections
-@cindex files, output, See output files
-@cindex input files, closing
-@cindex output, files@comma{} closing
-@cindex pipe, closing
-@cindex coprocesses, closing
-@cindex @code{getline} command, coprocesses@comma{} using from
+@cindex files @subentry output @seeentry{output files}
+@cindex input files @subentry closing
+@cindex output @subentry files, closing
+@cindex pipe @subentry closing
+@cindex coprocesses @subentry closing
+@cindex @code{getline} command @subentry coprocesses, using from
 
 If the same @value{FN} or the same shell command is used with @code{getline}
 more than once during the execution of an @command{awk} program
@@ -10315,9 +10344,9 @@ program closes the pipe after each line of output, then 
each line makes
 a separate message.
 @end itemize
 
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, @code{close()} 
function
-@cindex portability, @code{close()} function and
-@cindex @code{close()} function, portability
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry 
@code{close()} function
+@cindex portability @subentry @code{close()} function and
+@cindex @code{close()} function @subentry portability
 If you use more files than the system allows you to have open,
 @command{gawk} attempts to multiplex the available open files among
 your @value{DF}s.  @command{gawk}'s ability to do this depends upon the
@@ -10365,7 +10394,7 @@ It is, more likely, a close of a file that was never 
opened with a
 redirection, so @command{awk} silently does nothing, except return
 a negative value.
 
-@cindex @code{|} (vertical bar), @code{|&} operator (I/O), pipes@comma{} 
closing
+@cindex @code{|} (vertical bar) @subentry @code{|&} operator (I/O) @subentry 
pipes, closing
 When using the @samp{|&} operator to communicate with a coprocess,
 it is occasionally useful to be able to close one end of the two-way
 pipe without closing the other.
@@ -10381,11 +10410,11 @@ delayed until
 which describes it in more detail and gives an example.
 
 @sidebar Using @code{close()}'s Return Value
-@cindex dark corner, @code{close()} function
-@cindex @code{close()} function, return value
-@cindex return value@comma{} @code{close()} function
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, @code{close()} 
function
-@cindex Unix @command{awk}, @code{close()} function and
+@cindex dark corner @subentry @code{close()} function
+@cindex @code{close()} function @subentry return value
+@cindex return value, @code{close()} function
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry 
@code{close()} function
+@cindex Unix @command{awk} @subentry @code{close()} function and
 
 In many older versions of Unix @command{awk}, the @code{close()} function
 is actually a statement.
@@ -10399,8 +10428,8 @@ command | getline info
 retval = close(command)  # syntax error in many Unix awks
 @end example
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, @code{ERRNO} variable in
-@cindex @code{ERRNO} variable, with @command{close()} function
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry @code{ERRNO} variable in
+@cindex @code{ERRNO} variable @subentry with @command{close()} function
 @command{gawk} treats @code{close()} as a function.
 The return value is @minus{}1 if the argument names something
 that was never opened with a redirection, or if there is
@@ -10429,6 +10458,7 @@ if it fails.
 @end multitable
 @end float
 
+@cindex POSIX mode
 The POSIX standard is very vague; it says that @code{close()}
 returns zero on success and a nonzero value otherwise.  In general,
 different implementations vary in what they report when closing
@@ -10496,6 +10526,8 @@ For standard output, you may use @code{PROCINFO["-", 
"NONFATAL"]}
 or @code{PROCINFO["/dev/stdout", "NONFATAL"]}.  For standard error, use
 @code{PROCINFO["/dev/stderr", "NONFATAL"]}.
 
+@cindex @env{GAWK_SOCK_RETRIES} environment variable
+@cindex environment variables @subentry @env{GAWK_SOCK_RETRIES}
 When attempting to open a TCP/IP socket (@pxref{TCP/IP Networking}),
 @command{gawk} tries multiple times. The @env{GAWK_SOCK_RETRIES}
 environment variable (@pxref{Other Environment Variables}) allows you to
@@ -10617,7 +10649,7 @@ that provide the values used in expressions.
 @node Constants
 @subsection Constant Expressions
 
-@cindex constants, types of
+@cindex constants @subentry types of
 
 The simplest type of expression is the @dfn{constant}, which always has
 the same value.  There are three types of constants: numeric,
@@ -10636,8 +10668,8 @@ have different forms, but are internally stored in an 
identical manner.
 @node Scalar Constants
 @subsubsection Numeric and String Constants
 
-@cindex constants, numeric
-@cindex numeric constants
+@cindex constants @subentry numeric
+@cindex numeric @subentry constants
 A @dfn{numeric constant} stands for a number.  This number can be an
 integer, a decimal fraction, or a number in scientific (exponential)
 notation.@footnote{The internal representation of all numbers,
@@ -10653,7 +10685,8 @@ have the same value:
 1050e-1
 @end example
 
-@cindex string constants
+@cindex string @subentry constants
+@cindex constants @subentry string
 A @dfn{string constant} consists of a sequence of characters enclosed in
 double quotation marks.  For example:
 
@@ -10662,8 +10695,9 @@ double quotation marks.  For example:
 @end example
 
 @noindent
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, strings
-@cindex strings, length limitations
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry strings
+@cindex strings @subentry length limitations
+@cindex ASCII
 represents the string whose contents are @samp{parrot}.  Strings in
 @command{gawk} can be of any length, and they can contain any of the possible
 eight-bit ASCII characters, including ASCII @sc{nul} (character code zero).
@@ -10702,9 +10736,9 @@ $ @kbd{gawk 'BEGIN @{ print "hello, }
 @print{} gawk: cmd. line:1:               ^ syntax error
 @end example
 
-@cindex dark corner, string continuation
-@cindex strings, continuation across lines
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, strings
+@cindex dark corner @subentry string continuation
+@cindex strings @subentry continuation across lines
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry strings
 Although POSIX doesn't define what happens if you use an escaped
 newline, as in the previous C example, all known versions of
 @command{awk} allow you to do so.  Unfortunately, what each one
@@ -10718,6 +10752,7 @@ $ @kbd{gawk 'BEGIN @{ print "hello, \}
 @print{} hello, world
 @end example
 
+@cindex POSIX mode
 In POSIX mode (@pxref{Options}), @command{gawk} does not
 allow escaped newlines.  Otherwise, it behaves as just described.
 
@@ -10736,8 +10771,8 @@ $ @kbd{nawk 'BEGIN @{ print "hello, \}
 @subsubsection Octal and Hexadecimal Numbers
 @cindex octal numbers
 @cindex hexadecimal numbers
-@cindex numbers, octal
-@cindex numbers, hexadecimal
+@cindex numbers @subentry octal
+@cindex numbers @subentry hexadecimal
 
 In @command{awk}, all numbers are in decimal (i.e., base 10).  Many other
 programming languages allow you to specify numbers in other bases, often
@@ -10782,8 +10817,8 @@ Being able to use octal and hexadecimal constants in 
your programs is most
 useful when working with data that cannot be represented conveniently as
 characters or as regular numbers, such as binary data of various sorts.
 
-@cindex @command{gawk}, octal numbers and
-@cindex @command{gawk}, hexadecimal numbers and
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry octal numbers and
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry hexadecimal numbers and
 @command{gawk} allows the use of octal and hexadecimal
 constants in your program text.  However, such numbers in the input data
 are not treated differently; doing so by default would break old
@@ -10810,8 +10845,8 @@ $ @kbd{gawk 'BEGIN @{ print "021 is", 021 ; print 018 
@}'}
 @print{} 18
 @end example
 
-@cindex compatibility mode (@command{gawk}), octal numbers
-@cindex compatibility mode (@command{gawk}), hexadecimal numbers
+@cindex compatibility mode (@command{gawk}) @subentry octal numbers
+@cindex compatibility mode (@command{gawk}) @subentry hexadecimal numbers
 Octal and hexadecimal source code constants are a @command{gawk} extension.
 If @command{gawk} is in compatibility mode
 (@pxref{Options}),
@@ -10838,8 +10873,8 @@ $ @kbd{gawk 'BEGIN @{ printf "0x11 is <%s>\n", 0x11 @}'}
 @cindex regexp constants
 @cindex @code{~} (tilde), @code{~} operator
 @cindex tilde (@code{~}), @code{~} operator
-@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point), @code{!~} operator
-@cindex exclamation point (@code{!}), @code{!~} operator
+@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point) @subentry @code{!~} operator
+@cindex exclamation point (@code{!}) @subentry @code{!~} operator
 A @dfn{regexp constant} is a regular expression description enclosed in
 slashes, such as @code{@w{/^beginning and end$/}}.  Most regexps used in
 @command{awk} programs are constant, but the @samp{~} and @samp{!~}
@@ -10864,7 +10899,7 @@ POSIX @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, and then goes 
on to describe
 @node Standard Regexp Constants
 @subsubsection Standard Regular Expression Constants
 
-@cindex dark corner, regexp constants
+@cindex dark corner @subentry regexp constants
 When used on the righthand side of the @samp{~} or @samp{!~}
 operators, a regexp constant merely stands for the regexp that is to be
 matched.
@@ -10902,8 +10937,8 @@ if (/foo/ ~ $1) print "found foo"
 
 @c @cindex automatic warnings
 @c @cindex warnings, automatic
-@cindex @command{gawk}, regexp constants and
-@cindex regexp constants, in @command{gawk}
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry regexp constants and
+@cindex regexp constants @subentry in @command{gawk}
 @noindent
 This code is ``obviously'' testing @code{$1} for a match against the regexp
 @code{/foo/}.  But in fact, the expression @samp{/foo/ ~ $1} really means
@@ -10924,8 +10959,8 @@ matches = /foo/
 assigns either zero or one to the variable @code{matches}, depending
 upon the contents of the current input record.
 
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, regexp constants
-@cindex dark corner, regexp constants, as arguments to user-defined functions
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry regexp 
constants
+@cindex dark corner @subentry regexp constants @subentry as arguments to 
user-defined functions
 @cindexgawkfunc{gensub}
 @cindexawkfunc{sub}
 @cindexawkfunc{gsub}
@@ -11000,7 +11035,7 @@ it would be nice to have regexp constants that
 are @dfn{strongly typed}; in other words, that denote a regexp useful
 for matching, and not an expression.
 
-@cindex values, regexp
+@cindex values @subentry regexp
 @command{gawk} provides this feature.  A strongly typed regexp constant
 looks almost like a regular regexp constant, except that it is preceded
 by an @samp{@@} sign:
@@ -11063,8 +11098,8 @@ value of the original regexp text.
 @node Variables
 @subsection Variables
 
-@cindex variables, user-defined
-@cindex user-defined, variables
+@cindex variables @subentry user-defined
+@cindex user-defined @subentry variables
 @dfn{Variables} are ways of storing values at one point in your program for
 use later in another part of your program.  They can be manipulated
 entirely within the program text, and they can also be assigned values
@@ -11100,8 +11135,8 @@ change a variable's value, and the @code{match()}, 
@code{split()},
 and @code{patsplit()} functions can change the contents of their
 array parameters (@pxref{String Functions}).
 
-@cindex variables, built-in
-@cindex variables, initializing
+@cindex variables @subentry built-in
+@cindex variables @subentry initializing
 A few variables have special built-in meanings, such as @code{FS} (the
 field separator) and @code{NF} (the number of fields in the current input
 record).  @xref{Built-in Variables} for a list of the predefined variables.
@@ -11118,8 +11153,8 @@ which is what you would do in C and in most other 
traditional languages.
 
 @node Assignment Options
 @subsubsection Assigning Variables on the Command Line
-@cindex variables, assigning on command line
-@cindex command line, variables@comma{} assigning on
+@cindex variables @subentry assigning on command line
+@cindex command line @subentry variables, assigning on
 
 Any @command{awk} variable can be set by including a @dfn{variable assignment}
 among the arguments on the command line when @command{awk} is invoked
@@ -11173,7 +11208,7 @@ $ @kbd{awk '@{ print $n @}' n=4 inventory-shipped n=2 
mail-list}
 @dots{}
 @end example
 
-@cindex dark corner, command-line arguments
+@cindex dark corner @subentry command-line arguments
 Command-line arguments are made available for explicit examination by
 the @command{awk} program in the @code{ARGV} array
 (@pxref{ARGC and ARGV}).
@@ -11214,10 +11249,10 @@ this @value{SECTION} discusses this important facet 
of @command{awk}.
 @node Strings And Numbers
 @subsubsection How @command{awk} Converts Between Strings and Numbers
 
-@cindex converting, strings to numbers
-@cindex strings, converting
-@cindex numbers, converting
-@cindex converting, numbers to strings
+@cindex converting @subentry string to numbers
+@cindex strings @subentry converting
+@cindex numbers @subentry converting
+@cindex converting @subentry numbers to strings
 Strings are converted to numbers and numbers are converted to strings, if the 
context
 of the @command{awk} program demands it.  For example, if the value of
 either @code{foo} or @code{bar} in the expression @samp{foo + bar}
@@ -11238,8 +11273,8 @@ the variables @code{two} and @code{three} are converted 
to strings and
 concatenated together.  The resulting string is converted back to the
 number 23, to which 4 is then added.
 
-@cindex null strings, converting numbers to strings
-@cindex type conversion
+@cindex null strings @subentry converting numbers to strings
+@cindex type @subentry conversion
 If, for some reason, you need to force a number to be converted to a
 string, concatenate that number with the empty string, @code{""}.
 To force a string to be converted to a number, add zero to that string.
@@ -11265,7 +11300,7 @@ On most modern machines,
 value exactly.@footnote{Pathological cases can require up to
 752 digits (!), but we doubt that you need to worry about this.}
 
-@cindex dark corner, @code{CONVFMT} variable
+@cindex dark corner @subentry @code{CONVFMT} variable
 Strange results can occur if you set @code{CONVFMT} to a string that doesn't
 tell @code{sprintf()} how to format floating-point numbers in a useful way.
 For example, if you forget the @samp{%} in the format, @command{awk} converts
@@ -11286,10 +11321,10 @@ b = a ""
 @value{DARKCORNER}
 
 @sidebar Pre-POSIX @command{awk} Used @code{OFMT} for String Conversion
-@cindex POSIX @command{awk}, @code{OFMT} variable and
+@cindex POSIX @command{awk} @subentry @code{OFMT} variable and
 @cindex @code{OFMT} variable
-@cindex portability, new @command{awk} vs.@: old @command{awk}
-@cindex @command{awk}, new vs.@: old, @code{OFMT} variable
+@cindex portability @subentry new @command{awk} vs.@: old @command{awk}
+@cindex @command{awk} @subentry new vs.@: old @subentry @code{OFMT} variable
 Prior to the POSIX standard, @command{awk} used the value
 of @code{OFMT} for converting numbers to strings.  @code{OFMT}
 specifies the output format to use when printing numbers with @code{print}.
@@ -11314,7 +11349,7 @@ non-English locales use the comma (@samp{,}) as the 
decimal point
 character. European locales often use either a space or a period as
 the thousands separator, if they have one.
 
-@cindex dark corner, locale's decimal point character
+@cindex dark corner @subentry locale's decimal point character
 The POSIX standard says that @command{awk} always uses the period as the 
decimal
 point when reading the @command{awk} program source code, and for
 command-line variable assignments (@pxref{Other Arguments}).  However,
@@ -11342,6 +11377,7 @@ the decimal point separator.  In the normal @code{"C"} 
locale, @command{gawk}
 treats @samp{4,321} as 4, while in the Danish locale, it's treated
 as the full number including the fractional part, 4.321.
 
+@cindex POSIX mode
 Some earlier versions of @command{gawk} fully complied with this aspect
 of the standard.  However, many users in non-English locales complained
 about this behavior, because their data used a period as the decimal
@@ -11389,7 +11425,7 @@ of the values provided by constants and variables.
 @node Arithmetic Ops
 @subsection Arithmetic Operators
 @cindex arithmetic operators
-@cindex operators, arithmetic
+@cindex operators @subentry arithmetic
 @c @cindex addition
 @c @cindex subtraction
 @c @cindex multiplication
@@ -11428,9 +11464,9 @@ The following list provides the arithmetic operators in 
@command{awk},
 in order from the highest precedence to the lowest:
 
 @table @code
-@cindex common extensions, @code{**} operator
-@cindex extensions, common@comma{} @code{**} operator
-@cindex POSIX @command{awk}, arithmetic operators and
+@cindex common extensions @subentry @code{**} operator
+@cindex extensions @subentry common @subentry @code{**} operator
+@cindex POSIX @command{awk} @subentry arithmetic operators and
 @item @var{x} ^ @var{y}
 @itemx @var{x} ** @var{y}
 Exponentiation; @var{x} raised to the @var{y} power.  @samp{2 ^ 3} has
@@ -11446,7 +11482,7 @@ Unary plus; the expression is converted to a number.
 @item @var{x} * @var{y}
 Multiplication.
 
-@cindex troubleshooting, division
+@cindex troubleshooting @subentry division
 @cindex division
 @item @var{x} / @var{y}
 Division;  because all numbers in @command{awk} are floating-point
@@ -11471,7 +11507,7 @@ Unary plus and minus have the same precedence,
 the multiplication operators all have the same precedence, and
 addition and subtraction have the same precedence.
 
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, trunc-mod operation
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry trunc-mod 
operation
 @cindex trunc-mod operation
 When computing the remainder of @samp{@var{x} % @var{y}},
 the quotient is rounded toward zero to an integer and
@@ -11494,9 +11530,9 @@ In other @command{awk} implementations, the signedness 
of the remainder
 may be machine-dependent.
 @c FIXME !!! what does posix say?
 
-@cindex portability, @code{**} operator and
-@cindex @code{*} (asterisk), @code{**} operator
-@cindex asterisk (@code{*}), @code{**} operator
+@cindex portability @subentry @code{**} operator and
+@cindex @code{*} (asterisk) @subentry @code{**} operator
+@cindex asterisk (@code{*}) @subentry @code{**} operator
 @quotation NOTE
 The POSIX standard only specifies the use of @samp{^}
 for exponentiation.
@@ -11511,8 +11547,8 @@ For maximum portability, do not use the @samp{**} 
operator.
 @author Brian Kernighan
 @end quotation
 
-@cindex string operators
-@cindex operators, string
+@cindex string @subentry operators
+@cindex operators @subentry string
 @cindex concatenating
 There is only one string operation: concatenation.  It does not have a
 specific operator to represent it.  Instead, concatenation is performed by
@@ -11535,7 +11571,7 @@ $ @kbd{awk '@{ print "Field number one:" $1 @}' 
mail-list}
 @dots{}
 @end example
 
-@cindex troubleshooting, string concatenation
+@cindex troubleshooting @subentry string concatenation
 Because string concatenation does not have an explicit operator, it is
 often necessary to ensure that it happens at the right time by using
 parentheses to enclose the items to concatenate.  For example,
@@ -11562,7 +11598,7 @@ print "something meaningful" > (file name)
 @end example
 
 @cindex order of evaluation, concatenation
-@cindex evaluation order, concatenation
+@cindex evaluation order @subentry concatenation
 @cindex side effects
 Parentheses should be used around concatenation in all but the
 most common contexts, such as on the righthand side of @samp{=}.
@@ -11643,10 +11679,10 @@ you're never quite sure what you'll get.
 @node Assignment Ops
 @subsection Assignment Expressions
 @cindex assignment operators
-@cindex operators, assignment
-@cindex expressions, assignment
-@cindex @code{=} (equals sign), @code{=} operator
-@cindex equals sign (@code{=}), @code{=} operator
+@cindex operators @subentry assignment
+@cindex expressions @subentry assignment
+@cindex @code{=} (equals sign) @subentry @code{=} operator
+@cindex equals sign (@code{=}) @subentry @code{=} operator
 An @dfn{assignment} is an expression that stores a (usually different)
 value into a variable.  For example, let's assign the value one to the variable
 @code{z}:
@@ -11669,7 +11705,7 @@ message = "this " thing " is " predicate
 @end example
 
 @noindent
-@cindex side effects, assignment expressions
+@cindex side effects @subentry assignment expressions
 This also illustrates string concatenation.
 The @samp{=} sign is called an @dfn{assignment operator}.  It is the
 simplest assignment operator because the value of the righthand
@@ -11683,8 +11719,8 @@ a @dfn{side effect}.
 
 @cindex lvalues/rvalues
 @cindex rvalues/lvalues
-@cindex assignment operators, lvalues/rvalues
-@cindex operators, assignment
+@cindex assignment operators @subentry lvalues/rvalues
+@cindex operators @subentry assignment
 The lefthand operand of an assignment need not be a variable
 (@pxref{Variables}); it can also be a field
 (@pxref{Changing Fields}) or
@@ -11695,7 +11731,7 @@ The righthand operand may be any expression; it 
produces the new value
 that the assignment stores in the specified variable, field, or array
 element. (Such values are called @dfn{rvalues}.)
 
-@cindex variables, types of
+@cindex variables @subentry types of
 It is important to note that variables do @emph{not} have permanent types.
 A variable's type is simply the type of whatever value was last assigned
 to it.  In the following program fragment, the variable
@@ -11753,8 +11789,8 @@ and then test whether @code{x} equals one.  But this 
style tends to make
 programs hard to read; such nesting of assignments should be avoided,
 except perhaps in a one-shot program.
 
-@cindex @code{+} (plus sign), @code{+=} operator
-@cindex plus sign (@code{+}), @code{+=} operator
+@cindex @code{+} (plus sign) @subentry @code{+=} operator
+@cindex plus sign (@code{+}) @subentry @code{+=} operator
 Aside from @samp{=}, there are several other assignment operators that
 do arithmetic with the old value of the variable.  For example, the
 operator @samp{+=} computes a new value by adding the righthand value
@@ -11797,8 +11833,8 @@ BEGIN  @{
 @end group
 @end example
 
-@cindex operators, assignment, evaluation order
-@cindex assignment operators, evaluation order
+@cindex operators @subentry assignment @subentry evaluation order
+@cindex assignment operators @subentry evaluation order
 @noindent
 The indices of @code{bar} are practically guaranteed to be different, because
 @code{rand()} returns different values each time it is called.
@@ -11831,18 +11867,18 @@ The value of @code{a[3]} could be either two or four.
 case, the righthand operand is an expression whose value is converted
 to a number.
 
-@cindex @code{-} (hyphen), @code{-=} operator
-@cindex hyphen (@code{-}), @code{-=} operator
-@cindex @code{*} (asterisk), @code{*=} operator
-@cindex asterisk (@code{*}), @code{*=} operator
-@cindex @code{/} (forward slash), @code{/=} operator
-@cindex forward slash (@code{/}), @code{/=} operator
-@cindex @code{%} (percent sign), @code{%=} operator
-@cindex percent sign (@code{%}), @code{%=} operator
-@cindex @code{^} (caret), @code{^=} operator
-@cindex caret (@code{^}), @code{^=} operator
-@cindex @code{*} (asterisk), @code{**=} operator
-@cindex asterisk (@code{*}), @code{**=} operator
+@cindex @code{-} (hyphen) @subentry @code{-=} operator
+@cindex hyphen (@code{-}) @subentry @code{-=} operator
+@cindex @code{*} (asterisk) @subentry @code{*=} operator
+@cindex asterisk (@code{*}) @subentry @code{*=} operator
+@cindex @code{/} (forward slash) @subentry @code{/=} operator
+@cindex forward slash (@code{/}) @subentry @code{/=} operator
+@cindex @code{%} (percent sign) @subentry @code{%=} operator
+@cindex percent sign (@code{%}) @subentry @code{%=} operator
+@cindex @code{^} (caret) @subentry @code{^=} operator
+@cindex caret (@code{^}) @subentry @code{^=} operator
+@cindex @code{*} (asterisk) @subentry @code{**=} operator
+@cindex asterisk (@code{*}) @subentry @code{**=} operator
 @float Table,table-assign-ops
 @caption{Arithmetic assignment operators}
 @multitable @columnfractions .30 .70
@@ -11852,32 +11888,32 @@ to a number.
 @item @var{lvalue} @code{*=} @var{coefficient} @tab Multiply the value of 
@var{lvalue} by @var{coefficient}.
 @item @var{lvalue} @code{/=} @var{divisor} @tab Divide the value of 
@var{lvalue} by @var{divisor}.
 @item @var{lvalue} @code{%=} @var{modulus} @tab Set @var{lvalue} to its 
remainder by @var{modulus}.
-@cindex common extensions, @code{**=} operator
-@cindex extensions, common@comma{} @code{**=} operator
-@cindex @command{awk} language, POSIX version
+@cindex common extensions @subentry @code{**=} operator
+@cindex extensions @subentry common @subentry @code{**=} operator
+@cindex @command{awk} @subentry language, POSIX version
 @cindex POSIX @command{awk}
 @item @var{lvalue} @code{^=} @var{power} @tab Raise @var{lvalue} to the power 
@var{power}.
 @item @var{lvalue} @code{**=} @var{power} @tab Raise @var{lvalue} to the power 
@var{power}. @value{COMMONEXT}
 @end multitable
 @end float
 
-@cindex POSIX @command{awk}, @code{**=} operator and
-@cindex portability, @code{**=} operator and
+@cindex POSIX @command{awk} @subentry @code{**=} operator and
+@cindex portability @subentry @code{**=} operator and
 @quotation NOTE
 Only the @samp{^=} operator is specified by POSIX.
 For maximum portability, do not use the @samp{**=} operator.
 @end quotation
 
 @sidebar Syntactic Ambiguities Between @samp{/=} and Regular Expressions
-@cindex dark corner, regexp constants, @code{/=} operator and
-@cindex @code{/} (forward slash), @code{/=} operator, vs. @code{/=@dots{}/} 
regexp constant
-@cindex forward slash (@code{/}), @code{/=} operator, vs. @code{/=@dots{}/} 
regexp constant
-@cindex regexp constants, @code{/=@dots{}/}, @code{/=} operator and
+@cindex dark corner @subentry regexp constants @subentry @code{/=} operator and
+@cindex @code{/} (forward slash) @subentry @code{/=} operator @subentry vs. 
@code{/=@dots{}/} regexp constant
+@cindex forward slash (@code{/}) @subentry @code{/=} operator @subentry vs. 
@code{/=@dots{}/} regexp constant
+@cindex regexp constants @subentry @code{/=@dots{}/} @subentry @code{/=} 
operator and
 
 @c derived from email from  "Nelson H. F. Beebe" <address@hidden>
 @c Date: Mon, 1 Sep 1997 13:38:35 -0600 (MDT)
 
-@cindex dark corner, @code{/=} operator vs. @code{/=@dots{}/} regexp constant
+@cindex dark corner @subentry @code{/=} operator vs. @code{/=@dots{}/} regexp 
constant
 @cindex ambiguity, syntactic: @code{/=} operator vs. @code{/=@dots{}/} regexp 
constant
 @cindex syntactic ambiguity: @code{/=} operator vs. @code{/=@dots{}/} regexp 
constant
 @cindex @code{/=} operator vs. @code{/=@dots{}/} regexp constant
@@ -11910,16 +11946,16 @@ and @command{mawk} also do not.
 @subsection Increment and Decrement Operators
 
 @cindex increment operators
-@cindex operators, decrement/increment
+@cindex operators @subentry decrement/increment
 @dfn{Increment} and @dfn{decrement operators} increase or decrease the value of
 a variable by one.  An assignment operator can do the same thing, so
 the increment operators add no power to the @command{awk} language; however, 
they
 are convenient abbreviations for very common operations.
 
 @cindex side effects
-@cindex @code{+} (plus sign), @code{++} operator
-@cindex plus sign (@code{+}), @code{++} operator
-@cindex side effects, decrement/increment operators
+@cindex @code{+} (plus sign) @subentry @code{++} operator
+@cindex plus sign (@code{+}) @subentry @code{++} operator
+@cindex side effects @subentry decrement/increment operators
 The operator used for adding one is written @samp{++}.  It can be used to 
increment
 a variable either before or after taking its value.
 To @dfn{pre-increment} a variable @code{v}, write @samp{++v}.  This adds
@@ -11950,8 +11986,8 @@ long as you stick to numbers that are fairly small 
(less than
 @end ifnotinfo
 @end ifnottex
 
-@cindex @code{$} (dollar sign), incrementing fields and arrays
-@cindex dollar sign (@code{$}), incrementing fields and arrays
+@cindex @code{$} (dollar sign) @subentry incrementing fields and arrays
+@cindex dollar sign (@code{$}) @subentry incrementing fields and arrays
 Fields and array elements are incremented
 just like variables.  (Use @samp{$(i++)} when you want to do a field reference
 and a variable increment at the same time.  The parentheses are necessary
@@ -11964,8 +12000,8 @@ the lvalue to pre-decrement or after it to 
post-decrement.
 Following is a summary of increment and decrement expressions:
 
 @table @code
-@cindex @code{+} (plus sign), @code{++} operator
-@cindex plus sign (@code{+}), @code{++} operator
+@cindex @code{+} (plus sign) @subentry @code{++} operator
+@cindex plus sign (@code{+}) @subentry @code{++} operator
 @item ++@var{lvalue}
 Increment @var{lvalue}, returning the new value as the
 value of the expression.
@@ -11974,8 +12010,8 @@ value of the expression.
 Increment @var{lvalue}, returning the @emph{old} value of @var{lvalue}
 as the value of the expression.
 
-@cindex @code{-} (hyphen), @code{--} operator
-@cindex hyphen (@code{-}), @code{--} operator
+@cindex @code{-} (hyphen) @subentry @code{--} operator
+@cindex hyphen (@code{-}) @subentry @code{--} operator
 @item --@var{lvalue}
 Decrement @var{lvalue}, returning the new value as the
 value of the expression.
@@ -11991,8 +12027,8 @@ like @samp{@var{lvalue}++}, but instead of adding, it 
subtracts.)
 
 @sidebar Operator Evaluation Order
 @cindex precedence
-@cindex operators, precedence of
-@cindex portability, operators
+@cindex operators @subentry precedence of
+@cindex portability @subentry operators
 @cindex evaluation order
 @cindex Marx, Groucho
 @quotation
@@ -12084,7 +12120,7 @@ BEGIN @{
 @}
 @end example
 
-@cindex dark corner, @code{"0"} is actually true
+@cindex dark corner @subentry @code{"0"} is actually true
 There is a surprising consequence of the ``nonzero or non-null'' rule:
 the string constant @code{"0"} is actually true, because it is non-null.
 @value{DARKCORNER}
@@ -12100,13 +12136,12 @@ the string constant @code{"0"} is actually true, 
because it is non-null.
 @c leave it alone.
 
 @cindex comparison expressions
-@cindex expressions, comparison
-@cindex expressions, matching, See comparison expressions
-@cindex matching, expressions, See comparison expressions
-@cindex relational operators, See comparison operators
-@cindex operators, relational, See operators@comma{} comparison
-@cindex variable typing
-@cindex variables, types of, comparison expressions and
+@cindex expressions @subentry comparison
+@cindex expressions, matching @seeentry{comparison expressions}
+@cindex matching @subentry expressions @seeentry{comparison expressions}
+@cindex relational operators @seeentry{comparison operators}
+@cindex operators, relational @seeentry{operators, comparison}
+@cindex variables @subentry types of @subentry comparison expressions and
 Unlike in other programming languages, in @command{awk} variables do not have a
 fixed type. Instead, they can be either a number or a string, depending
 upon the value that is assigned to them.
@@ -12200,9 +12235,9 @@ $ @kbd{echo 37 | awk '@{ printf("%s %s < 42\n", $1,}
 Here are the rules for when @command{awk}
 treats data as a number, and for when it treats data as a string.
 
-@cindex numeric, strings
-@cindex strings, numeric
-@cindex POSIX @command{awk}, numeric strings and
+@cindex numeric @subentry strings
+@cindex strings @subentry numeric
+@cindex POSIX @command{awk} @subentry numeric strings and
 The POSIX standard uses the term @dfn{numeric string} for input data that
 looks numeric.  The @samp{37} in the previous example is a numeric string.
 So what is the type of a numeric string? Answer: numeric.
@@ -12414,28 +12449,29 @@ $ @kbd{echo hello 37 | gawk '@{ print typeof($1), 
typeof($2) @}'}
 
 @node Comparison Operators
 @subsubsection Comparison Operators
+@cindex operators @subentry comparison
 
 @dfn{Comparison expressions} compare strings or numbers for
 relationships such as equality.  They are written using @dfn{relational
 operators}, which are a superset of those in C.
 @ref{table-relational-ops} describes them.
 
-@cindex @code{<} (left angle bracket), @code{<} operator
-@cindex left angle bracket (@code{<}), @code{<} operator
-@cindex @code{<} (left angle bracket), @code{<=} operator
-@cindex left angle bracket (@code{<}), @code{<=} operator
-@cindex @code{>} (right angle bracket), @code{>=} operator
-@cindex right angle bracket (@code{>}), @code{>=} operator
-@cindex @code{>} (right angle bracket), @code{>} operator
-@cindex right angle bracket (@code{>}), @code{>} operator
-@cindex @code{=} (equals sign), @code{==} operator
-@cindex equals sign (@code{=}), @code{==} operator
-@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point), @code{!=} operator
-@cindex exclamation point (@code{!}), @code{!=} operator
+@cindex @code{<} (left angle bracket) @subentry @code{<} operator
+@cindex left angle bracket (@code{<}) @subentry @code{<} operator
+@cindex @code{<} (left angle bracket) @subentry @code{<=} operator
+@cindex left angle bracket (@code{<}) @subentry @code{<=} operator
+@cindex @code{>} (right angle bracket) @subentry @code{>=} operator
+@cindex right angle bracket (@code{>}) @subentry @code{>=} operator
+@cindex @code{>} (right angle bracket) @subentry @code{>} operator
+@cindex right angle bracket (@code{>}) @subentry @code{>} operator
+@cindex @code{=} (equals sign) @subentry @code{==} operator
+@cindex equals sign (@code{=}) @subentry @code{==} operator
+@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point) @subentry @code{!=} operator
+@cindex exclamation point (@code{!}) @subentry @code{!=} operator
 @cindex @code{~} (tilde), @code{~} operator
 @cindex tilde (@code{~}), @code{~} operator
-@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point), @code{!~} operator
-@cindex exclamation point (@code{!}), @code{!~} operator
+@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point) @subentry @code{!~} operator
+@cindex exclamation point (@code{!}) @subentry @code{!~} operator
 @cindex @code{in} operator
 @float Table,table-relational-ops
 @caption{Relational operators}
@@ -12464,7 +12500,7 @@ and so on.  Thus, @code{"10"} is less than @code{"9"}.  
If there are two
 strings where one is a prefix of the other, the shorter string is less than
 the longer one.  Thus, @code{"abc"} is less than @code{"abcd"}.
 
-@cindex troubleshooting, @code{==} operator
+@cindex troubleshooting @subentry @code{==} operator
 It is very easy to accidentally mistype the @samp{==} operator and
 leave off one of the @samp{=} characters.  The result is still valid
 @command{awk} code, but the program does not do what is intended:
@@ -12516,7 +12552,7 @@ $ @kbd{echo 1e2 3 | awk '@{ print ($1 < $2) ? "true" : 
"false" @}'}
 @print{} false
 @end example
 
-@cindex comparison expressions, string vs.@: regexp
+@cindex comparison expressions @subentry string vs.@: regexp
 @c @cindex string comparison vs.@: regexp comparison
 @c @cindex regexp comparison vs.@: string comparison
 @noindent
@@ -12548,15 +12584,15 @@ has the value one if @code{x} contains @samp{foo}, 
such as
 
 @cindex @code{~} (tilde), @code{~} operator
 @cindex tilde (@code{~}), @code{~} operator
-@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point), @code{!~} operator
-@cindex exclamation point (@code{!}), @code{!~} operator
+@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point) @subentry @code{!~} operator
+@cindex exclamation point (@code{!}) @subentry @code{!~} operator
 The righthand operand of the @samp{~} and @samp{!~} operators may be
 either a regexp constant (@code{/}@dots{}@code{/}) or an ordinary
 expression. In the latter case, the value of the expression as a string is 
used as a
 dynamic regexp (@pxref{Regexp Usage}; also
 @pxref{Computed Regexps}).
 
-@cindex @command{awk}, regexp constants and
+@cindex @command{awk} @subentry regexp constants and
 @cindex regexp constants
 A constant regular
 expression in slashes by itself is also an expression.
@@ -12584,6 +12620,7 @@ comparison.@footnote{Technically, string comparison is 
supposed to behave
 the same way as if the strings were compared with the C @code{strcoll()}
 function.}
 
+@cindex POSIX mode
 Because this behavior differs considerably from existing practice,
 @command{gawk} only implemented it when in POSIX mode (@pxref{Options}).
 Here is an example to illustrate the difference, in an @code{en_US.UTF-8}
@@ -12615,6 +12652,7 @@ a <= b && a >= b
 @end example
 @end quotation
 
+@cindex POSIX mode
 As of @value{PVERSION} 4.2, @command{gawk} continues to use locale
 collating order for @code{<}, @code{<=}, @code{>}, and @code{>=} only
 in POSIX mode.
@@ -12629,12 +12667,12 @@ and http://austingroupbugs.net/view.php?id=1070.
 @cindex and Boolean-logic operator
 @cindex or Boolean-logic operator
 @cindex not Boolean-logic operator
-@cindex expressions, Boolean
+@cindex expressions @subentry Boolean
 @cindex Boolean expressions
-@cindex operators, Boolean, See Boolean expressions
-@cindex Boolean operators, See Boolean expressions
-@cindex logical operators, See Boolean expressions
-@cindex operators, logical, See Boolean expressions
+@cindex operators, Boolean @seeentry{Boolean expressions}
+@cindex Boolean operators @seeentry{Boolean expressions}
+@cindex logical operators @seeentry{Boolean expressions}
+@cindex operators, logical @seeentry{Boolean expressions}
 
 A @dfn{Boolean expression} is a combination of comparison expressions or
 matching expressions, using the Boolean operators ``or''
@@ -12666,7 +12704,7 @@ both @samp{edu} and @samp{li}:
 if ($0 ~ /edu/ && $0 ~ /li/) print
 @end example
 
-@cindex side effects, Boolean operators
+@cindex side effects @subentry Boolean operators
 The subexpression @var{boolean2} is evaluated only if @var{boolean1}
 is true.  This can make a difference when @var{boolean2} contains
 expressions that have side effects. In the case of @samp{$0 ~ /foo/ &&
@@ -12706,11 +12744,11 @@ BEGIN @{ if (! ("HOME" in ENVIRON))
 @end table
 
 @cindex short-circuit operators
-@cindex operators, short-circuit
-@cindex @code{&} (ampersand), @code{&&} operator
-@cindex ampersand (@code{&}), @code{&&} operator
-@cindex @code{|} (vertical bar), @code{||} operator
-@cindex vertical bar (@code{|}), @code{||} operator
+@cindex operators @subentry short-circuit
+@cindex @code{&} (ampersand) @subentry @code{&&} operator
+@cindex ampersand (@code{&}) @subentry @code{&&} operator
+@cindex @code{|} (vertical bar) @subentry @code{||} operator
+@cindex vertical bar (@code{|}) @subentry @code{||} operator
 The @samp{&&} and @samp{||} operators are called @dfn{short-circuit}
 operators because of the way they work.  Evaluation of the full expression
 is ``short-circuited'' if the result can be determined partway through
@@ -12722,10 +12760,10 @@ by putting a newline after them.  But you cannot put 
a newline in front
 of either of these operators without using backslash continuation
 (@pxref{Statements/Lines}).
 
-@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point), @code{!}  operator
-@cindex exclamation point (@code{!}), @code{!} operator
+@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point) @subentry @code{!}  operator
+@cindex exclamation point (@code{!}) @subentry @code{!} operator
 @cindex newlines
-@cindex variables, flag
+@cindex variables @subentry flag
 @cindex flag variables
 The actual value of an expression using the @samp{!} operator is
 either one or zero, depending upon the truth value of the expression it
@@ -12779,8 +12817,8 @@ The reason it's there is to avoid printing the 
bracketing
 @node Conditional Exp
 @subsection Conditional Expressions
 @cindex conditional expressions
-@cindex expressions, conditional
-@cindex expressions, selecting
+@cindex expressions @subentry conditional
+@cindex expressions @subentry selecting
 
 A @dfn{conditional expression} is a special kind of expression that has
 three operands.  It allows you to use one expression's value to select
@@ -12804,7 +12842,7 @@ For example, the following expression produces the 
absolute value of @code{x}:
 x >= 0 ? x : -x
 @end example
 
-@cindex side effects, conditional expressions
+@cindex side effects @subentry conditional expressions
 Each time the conditional expression is computed, only one of
 @var{if-true-exp} and @var{if-false-exp} is used; the other is ignored.
 This is important when the expressions have side effects.  For example,
@@ -12822,9 +12860,9 @@ and the other is not.
 @xref{Arrays},
 for more information about arrays.
 
-@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk}, line continuations
-@cindex line continuations, @command{gawk}
-@cindex @command{gawk}, line continuation in
+@cindex differences in @command{awk} and @command{gawk} @subentry line 
continuations
+@cindex line continuations @subentry @command{gawk}
+@cindex @command{gawk} @subentry line continuation in
 As a minor @command{gawk} extension,
 a statement that uses @samp{?:} can be continued simply
 by putting a newline after either character.
@@ -12843,7 +12881,7 @@ This enables you to
 ask for it by name at any point in the program.  For
 example, the function @code{sqrt()} computes the square root of a number.
 
-@cindex functions, built-in
+@cindex functions @subentry built-in
 A fixed set of functions are @dfn{built in}, which means they are
 available in every @command{awk} program.  The @code{sqrt()} function is one
 of these.  @xref{Built-in} for a list of built-in
@@ -12854,7 +12892,7 @@ for instructions on how to do this.
 Finally, @command{gawk} lets you write functions in C or C++
 that may be called from your program (@pxref{Dynamic Extensions}).
 
-@cindex arguments, in function calls
+@cindex arguments @subentry in function calls
 The way to use a function is with a @dfn{function call} expression,
 which consists of the function name followed immediately by a list of
 @dfn{arguments} in parentheses.  The arguments are expressions that
@@ -12869,7 +12907,7 @@ atan2(y, x)            @ii{two arguments}
 rand()                 @ii{no arguments}
 @end example
 
-@cindex troubleshooting, function call syntax
+@cindex troubleshooting @subentry function call syntax
 @quotation CAUTION
 Do not put any space between the function name and the opening parenthesis!
 A user-defined function name looks just like the name of a
@@ -12904,7 +12942,7 @@ which is a way to choose the function to call at 
runtime, instead of
 when you write the source code to your program. We defer discussion of
 this feature until later; see @ref{Indirect Calls}.
 
-@cindex side effects, function calls
+@cindex side effects @subentry function calls
 Like every other expression, the function call has a value, often
 called the @dfn{return value}, which is computed by the function
 based on the arguments you give it.  In this example, the return value
@@ -12954,7 +12992,7 @@ $ @kbd{awk -f matchit.awk}
 @node Precedence
 @section Operator Precedence (How Operators Nest)
 @cindex precedence
-@cindex operators, precedence
+@cindex operators @subentry precedence of
 
 @dfn{Operator precedence} determines how operators are grouped when
 different operators appear close by in one expression.  For example,
@@ -13001,47 +13039,47 @@ to lowest precedence:
 @item @code{(}@dots{}@code{)}
 Grouping.
 
-@cindex @code{$} (dollar sign), @code{$} field operator
-@cindex dollar sign (@code{$}), @code{$} field operator
+@cindex @code{$} (dollar sign) @subentry @code{$} field operator
+@cindex dollar sign (@code{$}) @subentry @code{$} field operator
 @item @code{$}
 Field reference.
 
-@cindex @code{+} (plus sign), @code{++} operator
-@cindex plus sign (@code{+}), @code{++} operator
-@cindex @code{-} (hyphen), @code{--} operator
-@cindex hyphen (@code{-}), @code{--} operator
+@cindex @code{+} (plus sign) @subentry @code{++} operator
+@cindex plus sign (@code{+}) @subentry @code{++} operator
+@cindex @code{-} (hyphen) @subentry @code{--} operator
+@cindex hyphen (@code{-}) @subentry @code{--} operator
 @item @code{++ --}
 Increment, decrement.
 
-@cindex @code{^} (caret), @code{^} operator
-@cindex caret (@code{^}), @code{^} operator
-@cindex @code{*} (asterisk), @code{**} operator
-@cindex asterisk (@code{*}), @code{**} operator
+@cindex @code{^} (caret) @subentry @code{^} operator
+@cindex caret (@code{^}) @subentry @code{^} operator
+@cindex @code{*} (asterisk) @subentry @code{**} operator
+@cindex asterisk (@code{*}) @subentry @code{**} operator
 @item @code{^ **}
 Exponentiation.  These operators group right to left.
 
-@cindex @code{+} (plus sign), @code{+} operator
-@cindex plus sign (@code{+}), @code{+} operator
-@cindex @code{-} (hyphen), @code{-} operator
-@cindex hyphen (@code{-}), @code{-} operator
-@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point), @code{!} operator
-@cindex exclamation point (@code{!}), @code{!} operator
+@cindex @code{+} (plus sign) @subentry @code{+} operator
+@cindex plus sign (@code{+}) @subentry @code{+} operator
+@cindex @code{-} (hyphen) @subentry @code{-} operator
+@cindex hyphen (@code{-}) @subentry @code{-} operator
+@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point) @subentry @code{!} operator
+@cindex exclamation point (@code{!}) @subentry @code{!} operator
 @item @code{+ - !}
 Unary plus, minus, logical ``not.''
 
-@cindex @code{*} (asterisk), @code{*} operator, as multiplication operator
-@cindex asterisk (@code{*}), @code{*} operator, as multiplication operator
-@cindex @code{/} (forward slash), @code{/} operator
-@cindex forward slash (@code{/}), @code{/} operator
-@cindex @code{%} (percent sign), @code{%} operator
-@cindex percent sign (@code{%}), @code{%} operator
+@cindex @code{*} (asterisk) @subentry @code{*} operator @subentry as 
multiplication operator
+@cindex asterisk (@code{*}) @subentry @code{*} operator @subentry as 
multiplication operator
+@cindex @code{/} (forward slash) @subentry @code{/} operator
+@cindex forward slash (@code{/}) @subentry @code{/} operator
+@cindex @code{%} (percent sign) @subentry @code{%} operator
+@cindex percent sign (@code{%}) @subentry @code{%} operator
 @item @code{* / %}
 Multiplication, division, remainder.
 
-@cindex @code{+} (plus sign), @code{+} operator
-@cindex plus sign (@code{+}), @code{+} operator
-@cindex @code{-} (hyphen), @code{-} operator
-@cindex hyphen (@code{-}), @code{-} operator
+@cindex @code{+} (plus sign) @subentry @code{+} operator
+@cindex plus sign (@code{+}) @subentry @code{+} operator
+@cindex @code{-} (hyphen) @subentry @code{-} operator
+@cindex hyphen (@code{-}) @subentry @code{-} operator
 @item @code{+ -}
 Addition, subtraction.
 
@@ -13050,35 +13088,35 @@ There is no special symbol for concatenation.
 The operands are simply written side by side
 (@pxref{Concatenation}).
 
-@cindex @code{<} (left angle bracket), @code{<} operator
-@cindex left angle bracket (@code{<}), @code{<} operator
-@cindex @code{<} (left angle bracket), @code{<=} operator
-@cindex left angle bracket (@code{<}), @code{<=} operator
-@cindex @code{>} (right angle bracket), @code{>=} operator
-@cindex right angle bracket (@code{>}), @code{>=} operator
-@cindex @code{>} (right angle bracket), @code{>} operator
-@cindex right angle bracket (@code{>}), @code{>} operator
-@cindex @code{=} (equals sign), @code{==} operator
-@cindex equals sign (@code{=}), @code{==} operator
-@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point), @code{!=} operator
-@cindex exclamation point (@code{!}), @code{!=} operator
-@cindex @code{>} (right angle bracket), @code{>>} operator (I/O)
-@cindex right angle bracket (@code{>}), @code{>>} operator (I/O)
-@cindex operators, input/output
-@cindex @code{|} (vertical bar), @code{|} operator (I/O)
-@cindex vertical bar (@code{|}), @code{|} operator (I/O)
-@cindex operators, input/output
-@cindex @code{|} (vertical bar), @code{|&} operator (I/O)
-@cindex vertical bar (@code{|}), @code{|&} operator (I/O)
-@cindex operators, input/output
+@cindex @code{<} (left angle bracket) @subentry @code{<} operator
+@cindex left angle bracket (@code{<}) @subentry @code{<} operator
+@cindex @code{<} (left angle bracket) @subentry @code{<=} operator
+@cindex left angle bracket (@code{<}) @subentry @code{<=} operator
+@cindex @code{>} (right angle bracket) @subentry @code{>=} operator
+@cindex right angle bracket (@code{>}) @subentry @code{>=} operator
+@cindex @code{>} (right angle bracket) @subentry @code{>} operator
+@cindex right angle bracket (@code{>}) @subentry @code{>} operator
+@cindex @code{=} (equals sign) @subentry @code{==} operator
+@cindex equals sign (@code{=}) @subentry @code{==} operator
+@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point) @subentry @code{!=} operator
+@cindex exclamation point (@code{!}) @subentry @code{!=} operator
+@cindex @code{>} (right angle bracket) @subentry @code{>>} operator (I/O)
+@cindex right angle bracket (@code{>}) @subentry @code{>>} operator (I/O)
+@cindex operators @subentry input/output
+@cindex @code{|} (vertical bar) @subentry @code{|} operator (I/O)
+@cindex vertical bar (@code{|}) @subentry @code{|} operator (I/O)
+@cindex operators @subentry input/output
+@cindex @code{|} (vertical bar) @subentry @code{|&} operator (I/O)
+@cindex vertical bar (@code{|}) @subentry @code{|&} operator (I/O)
+@cindex operators @subentry input/output
 @item @code{< <= == != > >= >> | |&}
 Relational and redirection.
 The relational operators and the redirections have the same precedence
 level.  Characters such as @samp{>} serve both as relationals and as
 redirections; the context distinguishes between the two meanings.
 
-@cindex @code{print} statement, I/O operators in
-@cindex @code{printf} statement, I/O operators in
+@cindex @code{print} statement @subentry I/O operators in
+@cindex @code{printf} statement @subentry I/O operators in
 Note that the I/O redirection operators in @code{print} and @code{printf}
 statements belong to the statement level, not to expressions.  The
 redirection does not produce an expression that could be the operand of
@@ -13090,8 +13128,8 @@ The correct way to write this statement is @samp{print 
foo > (a ? b : c)}.
 
 @cindex @code{~} (tilde), @code{~} operator
 @cindex tilde (@code{~}), @code{~} operator
-@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point), @code{!~} operator
-@cindex exclamation point (@code{!}), @code{!~} operator
+@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point) @subentry @code{!~} operator
+@cindex exclamation point (@code{!}) @subentry @code{!~} operator
 @item @code{~ !~}
 Matching, nonmatching.
 
@@ -13099,43 +13137,43 @@ Matching, nonmatching.
 @item @code{in}
 Array membership.
 
-@cindex @code{&} (ampersand), @code{&&} operator
-@cindex ampersand (@code{&}), @code{&&} operator
+@cindex @code{&} (ampersand) @subentry @code{&&} operator
+@cindex ampersand (@code{&}) @subentry @code{&&} operator
 @item @code{&&}
 Logical ``and.''
 
-@cindex @code{|} (vertical bar), @code{||} operator
-@cindex vertical bar (@code{|}), @code{||} operator
+@cindex @code{|} (vertical bar) @subentry @code{||} operator
+@cindex vertical bar (@code{|}) @subentry @code{||} operator
 @item @code{||}
 Logical ``or.''
 
-@cindex @code{?} (question mark), @code{?:} operator
-@cindex question mark (@code{?}), @code{?:} operator
-@cindex @code{:} (colon), @code{?:} operator
-@cindex colon (@code{:}), @code{?:} operator
+@cindex @code{?} (question mark) @subentry @code{?:} operator
+@cindex question mark (@code{?}) @subentry @code{?:} operator
+@cindex @code{:} (colon) @subentry @code{?:} operator
+@cindex colon (@code{:}) @subentry @code{?:} operator
 @item @code{?:}
 Conditional.  This operator groups right to left.
 
-@cindex @code{+} (plus sign), @code{+=} operator
-@cindex plus sign (@code{+}), @code{+=} operator
-@cindex @code{-} (hyphen), @code{-=} operator
-@cindex hyphen (@code{-}), @code{-=} operator
-@cindex @code{*} (asterisk), @code{*=} operator
-@cindex asterisk (@code{*}), @code{*=} operator
-@cindex @code{*} (asterisk), @code{**=} operator
-@cindex asterisk (@code{*}), @code{**=} operator
-@cindex @code{/} (forward slash), @code{/=} operator
-@cindex forward slash (@code{/}), @code{/=} operator
-@cindex @code{%} (percent sign), @code{%=} operator
-@cindex percent sign (@code{%}), @code{%=} operator
-@cindex @code{^} (caret), @code{^=} operator
-@cindex caret (@code{^}), @code{^=} operator
+@cindex @code{+} (plus sign) @subentry @code{+=} operator
+@cindex plus sign (@code{+}) @subentry @code{+=} operator
+@cindex @code{-} (hyphen) @subentry @code{-=} operator
+@cindex hyphen (@code{-}) @subentry @code{-=} operator
+@cindex @code{*} (asterisk) @subentry @code{*=} operator
+@cindex asterisk (@code{*}) @subentry @code{*=} operator
+@cindex @code{*} (asterisk) @subentry @code{**=} operator
+@cindex asterisk (@code{*}) @subentry @code{**=} operator
+@cindex @code{/} (forward slash) @subentry @code{/=} operator
+@cindex forward slash (@code{/}) @subentry @code{/=} operator
+@cindex @code{%} (percent sign) @subentry @code{%=} operator
+@cindex percent sign (@code{%}) @subentry @code{%=} operator
+@cindex @code{^} (caret) @subentry @code{^=} operator
+@cindex caret (@code{^}) @subentry @code{^=} operator
 @item @code{= += -= *= /= %= ^= **=}
 Assignment.  These operators group right to left.
 @end table
 
-@cindex POSIX @command{awk}, @code{**} operator and
-@cindex portability, operators, not in POSIX @command{awk}
+@cindex POSIX @command{awk} @subentry @code{**} operator and
+@cindex portability @subentry operators @subentry not in POSIX @command{awk}
 @quotation NOTE
 The @samp{|&}, @samp{**}, and @samp{**=} operators are not specified by POSIX.
 For maximum portability, do not use them.
@@ -13282,7 +13320,7 @@ building something useful.
 * Empty::                       The empty pattern, which matches every record.
 @end menu
 
-@cindex patterns, types of
+@cindex patterns @subentry types of
 Patterns in @command{awk} control the execution of rules---a rule is
 executed when its pattern matches the current input record.
 The following is a summary of the types of @command{awk} patterns:
@@ -13323,8 +13361,8 @@ The empty pattern matches every input record.
 
 @node Regexp Patterns
 @subsection Regular Expressions as Patterns
-@cindex patterns, regular expressions as
-@cindex regular expressions, as patterns
+@cindex patterns @subentry regexp constants as
+@cindex regular expressions @subentry as patterns
 
 Regular expressions are one of the first kinds of patterns presented
 in this book.
@@ -13340,8 +13378,8 @@ END            @{ print buzzwords, "buzzwords seen" @}
 
 @node Expression Patterns
 @subsection Expressions as Patterns
-@cindex expressions, as patterns
-@cindex patterns, expressions as
+@cindex expressions @subentry as patterns
+@cindex patterns @subentry expressions as
 
 Any @command{awk} expression is valid as an @command{awk} pattern.
 The pattern matches if the expression's value is nonzero (if a
@@ -13352,8 +13390,8 @@ value depends directly on the new input record's text; 
otherwise, it
 depends on only what has happened so far in the execution of the
 @command{awk} program.
 
-@cindex comparison expressions, as patterns
-@cindex patterns, comparison expressions as
+@cindex comparison expressions @subentry as patterns
+@cindex patterns @subentry comparison expressions as
 Comparison expressions, using the comparison operators described in
 @ref{Typing and Comparison},
 are a very common kind of pattern.
@@ -13366,12 +13404,12 @@ is used as a dynamic regular expression
 The following example prints the second field of each input record
 whose first field is precisely @samp{li}:
 
-@cindex @code{/} (forward slash), patterns and
-@cindex forward slash (@code{/}), patterns and
+@cindex @code{/} (forward slash) @subentry patterns and
+@cindex forward slash (@code{/}) @subentry patterns and
 @cindex @code{~} (tilde), @code{~} operator
 @cindex tilde (@code{~}), @code{~} operator
-@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point), @code{!~} operator
-@cindex exclamation point (@code{!}), @code{!~} operator
+@cindex @code{!} (exclamation point) @subentry @code{!~} operator
+@cindex exclamation poi